Young Puppy w/ Pneumonia - future problems?

Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by ashlyne, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. ashlyne

    ashlyne New Member

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    My husband and I had reserved an english bulldog pup for us a couple of weeks ago. Since then, the breeder has told us she has had some problems. She was small to begin with, 2nd smallest in a litter of 11. Her soft pallet has a small "V" opening and has caused her to get aspiration pneumonia a couple of times. Amazingly, she's pulled through. Her owner is tube feeding her (she's now 4 weeks old) and the vet has said the pallet issue is something she'll grown out of in time. They do have a fully healthy (and big) female pup that we've reserved as our backup puppy in case this one didn't make it or had lasting problems, but we just had our hearts set on this little one.

    My question is, with the pallet issue and having pretty serious pneumonia when she was so young, is she more prone to having problems later on? I've only found a couple of references online about it. One said there's no reason to assume there'd be problems. Another said the lungs can be damaged and the only thing is that she won't be able to be as active as an adult (not all that serious a problem since this breed isn't very active to begin with). The breeder will give us a Health Certificate and guarantee no matter what but I'd rather avoid having to return a puppy.

    Any experienced advice would be VERY welcome!
    Thanks!!
     
  2. MomOf7

    MomOf7 Evil Kitty taco eater

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    Its really up to you. I have never had a sick puppy with palet problems. Sounds like the pup has a minor cleft palet. Could grow out of it but may always suffer from it too. The breeder should reduce the price on that pup for a good pet home.
    You have to look at the risks and determine whether or not your willing to deal with bad news later on.
    I would lean towards the healthy pup. Thats just me

    Good luck and I hope you get a happy healthy pup that will grow into a healthy loving family companion.
     
  3. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    I agree with Mom .....you may be in for some big vet bills and should get a huge discount if you want this pup . With health and eating issues at this age , I don't think I'd be strong enough to take this pup on except as an adoption . Could your own vet valuate the issues ??
     
  4. showpug

    showpug New Member

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    As an english bulldog owner myself, all I can tell you is that this breed is HIGH maintenance even when they are perfectly healthy! I know your heart goes out to this pup, but why start out behind? There will be plenty of challenges with your new puppy. Don't you think it would be best to start off with the healthiest puppy possible?
     
  5. ashlyne

    ashlyne New Member

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    Thanks for the advice -- I am getting a couple of vets opinions on this, one a trusted (and very honest) friend. I am leaning towards the healthier of the two and the only way the breeder would sell us the other pup is if she got a clean bill of health long before purchase time (ie, the palate issue resolved and a full recovery from pneumonia). Not sure if they'll cut us a deal considering they've spent so much on her to make her healthy, but it's worth asking. I definitely won't buy a sick pup...a recovered one, yes, but my concern is if having this early sickness makes the pup more prone to be sick later on or causes them some lung damage. I just don't know enough about it ....thus the posting, internet research and calling vets for opinions ;) I'd hate to turn down our first pick if this isn't a big deal; and I'd hate to take on the financial responsibility of a sick-prone pup, even though we have the resources and time if it came to that (otherwise I wouldn't risk it).

    Still waiting to hear back from the messages I've left a couple of vets and I'll update you on what that turns out to be in case others come across this situation. Thanks!
     

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