Puppy Teeth Question Again

Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by ladyhannibal, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. ladyhannibal

    ladyhannibal Lady Hannibal

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    Marty, the puppy I posted a thread regarding his teeth http://www.chazhound.com/forums/showthread.php?t=149785 (and thank you to all who have commented :)). But after seeing his teeth brittle away more and more over a matter of days I followed my gut and took him to a new vet. After help from a canine dentist, Marty has now been diagnosed with enamel hypocalcification.

    Unfortunately I cannot keep him. I love the poor dog very much but I cannot afford the immense medical care I know Marty will need (and deserve. He is such a sweet little angel) - I am looking for someone who can take over his care, knowing what's in his future. :(

    We have a vet who wants him and will take over his medical care if I cannot find a new owner who has a lot of financial flexibility and time to give him.

    The questions we are searching for help with is how did a puppy develop a fever (even a low grade fever for a short while) and not show any signs of sickness? And what could have given it to the puppy?

    My breeder keeps the whelping puppies in her home and watches them carefully. We are just trying to find out why and how to make sure this never happens again and find out how it did.

    So far, I've discovered this issue is rare and I've heard from several vets that this could be caused by something as small as a scratch on the puppy from another pup during the weaning stage. That the puppy developed a mild fever, even for a short while, and this destroyed his developing enamel during this fragile time of development (between five and six weeks of age).

    Anybody got any ideas? I am so lost. This vet even told me that corgis are prone to several 'weird' diseases (I've had another bad case with corgis. My last, a male corgi named Ducky, died of lymphoma within weeks - and he was only EIGHTEEN WEEKS OLD! :(). I've always heard they are a sturdy, healthy breed...
     
  2. thehoundgirl

    thehoundgirl Active Member

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    I'm sorry but if you can't afford extensive medical care for him, how is anyone else going to afford that? This economy is not good any more and people don't have that kind of money either.

    The vet sounds like a good option if you cannot afford his medical care. I know dentals can be expensive but maybe you can work something out with your vet so you can keep him. :)
     
  3. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    Couldn't you also rehome him back to the breeder?

    If I were you, and the vet was a good option, I'd either give the dog to the vet or give him back to the breeder. There aren't a lot of other people who would be able to financially take care of him. :(
     
  4. Beanie

    Beanie Clicker Cult Coordinator

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    From the other post:
    So somebody who doesn't already have a major medical expense to deal with would probably be in a better situation to afford it, for starters.
    It would make sense if you were asking, I dunno, Donald Trump "Well if YOU can't afford it, who could?" But this is presumably an average person here with an average income. There are plenty of people just on this forum who take multiple vacations every year, go on cruises, go overseas... so, uh, that's how other people could afford that. They make more money. I don't understand this question... :confused:



    From the other post it sounds like the vet who is willing to take him is the breeder's vet... honestly I think that might be the best way to go. This guy has already met Marty, and it would likely be pretty easy for him to give him the professional teeth cleanings he's going to need from here on out, probably at not much cost out of pocket if it's his own practice. If the breeder is happy with that arrangement, I think it's probably the best option.
    Is it possible that he damaged his teeth just from too much crazy chomping as a puppy rather than a prolonged feever?? I know in the original post you thought that was a possibility...
     
  5. thehoundgirl

    thehoundgirl Active Member

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    For crying out loud. It was a simple question. I wasn't trying to be snarky as you are taking it and you're being a bit snarky with me about it and there's no need to be. What's so hard to understand? If you can't afford the dog, you can't. I'm not trying to come down on her about it... maybe work with the vet on the cost with your situation. I'm pretty sure you are bonded with the little guy and I am sorry he has this. :(
     
  6. ladyhannibal

    ladyhannibal Lady Hannibal

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    If it were only a few teeth I could manage but it's the fact he has this condition is with every tooth he cuts. :( Poor guy just has major problems that not many today can afford, especially us. That's why I'm looking to rehome him and find out why/how this happened.

    So far the vet is the best option, I agree. Most likely I will be sending Marty to him within the week. He loves corgis and has already kept Marty before so I know Marty likes him and will be well cared for.

    The breeder will have to put him to sleep if I return him to her, which is a horrible thing to have to have done but the medical complications are so expensive and one has very few options of what to do...That's why the vet has agreed to take ownership of the dog - to prevent THAT from happening.


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  7. ladyhannibal

    ladyhannibal Lady Hannibal

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    Unfortunatly that does set us apart from others even though we have loved every dog we've had like children, more so really. It's just too much of a expense, and one which is not a 'one time expense' but something the dog will suffer with for the rest of his life...and we haven't had him very long.

    Fact is we just can't handle the expense or the mental stress of it. We just lost out beloved Ducky to lymphoma, a horrific disease, in last November.

    Sending Marty somewhere where he can be loved but medically cared for is the best we can give him


    He does and that's who is going to take him it seems. He is the best caregiver for Marty, he knows best how to deal with this cituation and has contacts and equiptment to perform the procedures at a lower cost.

    The cause of this just really scares us, the lot of us, it seems like a condition a puppy could so easily get but talking to four vets and three other breeders it's something no one has ever personally experienced.

    Just like Ducky contracting cancer at only eighteen months. :( Rare, very rare, but yet we've been hit back to back by 'rare' three times. One case being with my fiancee in the last year and all the medival conditions which have hit him, we lost Ducky about the same time.


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