Powerful New Ways To Stop Your Dog From Barking Now!

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by ShopieCha, May 1, 2010.

  1. ShopieCha

    ShopieCha Training Pro =)

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    Dogs love to bark. It's a perfectly natural thing in your canine to do, simply because it's normal for us people to speak.

    The problem is when it gets out of hand. So the goal isn't to stop barking as much as it is to control excessive barking.

    Why does your dog bark?

    They are claiming their territory or are excited or even alerting you of danger. There are countless reasons why, including the fact that some seem to do it just for fun, so here is how you stop the dog from excessive barking.

    Do not reward your dog for barking

    1. Do not give attention by yelling or screaming when they bark. In case your dog is barking his head off outdoors, then you definitely let him in, this simply rewards and due to this fact reinforces the barking.

    The Most Common Reason Dogs Bark Is For Attention Or To Demand Something

    If you set up your self as your canine's chief in the owner-dog relationship you share, the sort of barking drawback will not occur. Within the process of training you may also form a strong bond collectively based on trust and mutual respect.

    You can also train your dog the "Stop" or "Quiet" command to assist stop this annoying kind of drawback barking. When your canine is barking simply say "QUIET!" simultaneously you wave a tasty treat in front of your canine's nose. After you dog is quiet for a number of seconds you can then give him/her the treat. Finally you will solely have to say "QUIET!", with out the necessity for a treat.

    One other proven method to assist cease your dog from barking for consideration is to simply ignore your dog. Your canine will little question turn into frustrated and bark a whole lot initially, however as soon as he realizes that it's not getting him anyplace, he will stop. Warning - this coaching method can be hard on the ears for some time! Do not forget that a dog's conduct that's not rewarded and reinforced will turn into less prevalent.

    I know if you apply these tips you will get better results than you ever knew possible.
     
  2. Whisper

    Whisper Kaleidoscopic Eye

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    LOL, to a very vocal dog, ignoring is not going to do anything to stop them barking.

    I find the easiest way is to first teach the dog to bark on command. Then teach them an "enough" command to go along with it. It works very well for me.
     
  3. ShopieCha

    ShopieCha Training Pro =)

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    Yup, the truth is one technique does not work for every dog. I am glad you have found the "enough" command to be useful. That is very similar to what I am trying to describe in the post.
     
  4. colliewog

    colliewog Collies&Terriers, Oh My!

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    So if my dogs bark at me while we are in the ring, they are lacking in training and don't trust or respect me? I always thought it was because she was a high drive herding dog ....
     
  5. Maura

    Maura New Member

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    Instead of yelling at my dog, I hold a treat up to his nose. He has to stop barking in order to sniff the treat. I say "hush" and give him the treat.
     
  6. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    No, but if your dog is demand-barking or barking for attention, it would work. It all depends on what he's barking at.

    Isn't that pretty much exactly what the OP said?
     
  7. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    I wish that worked with Charlie. Barking and sniffing are two activities he can do simultaneously with almost everything else (including eat his dinner).

    The only thing I have seen him do where barking is incompatible is drinking. And that's because he plunges his head totally underwater. But then I can't reinforce it because his ears are underwater too. :rofl1:

    He's one of those dogs where barking is a rewarding activity by itself. I don't think there is a way to control it with him, aside from crating him when he gets too wound up until he settles down again.
     
  8. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    So...you present a treat while he's barking? And this teaches him what exactly?
     
  9. puppydog

    puppydog Tru evil has no pantyline

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    I generally find that sticking my head out the back door and bellowing "Shuddup" works well. LOL!
     
  10. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    With four herding dogs...living on 16 acres so we're out of earshot for the neighbors works well. They can bark all they want. :D
     
  11. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    That's how I taught my dogs to quiet on cue. I promted the barking, (knock on the door) let them bark a few barks, then distracted them by holding a treat near their nose, saying, "enough." The treat is not given while the dog is barking. (no way) :eek:

    What happens is, the treat prompts them to be quiet, as they're distracted and their mind is not on the stimuli that got them barking, but instead, the super yummy treat. (start with milder stimuli and work up) I held the treat in front of their nose for about 3-5 seconds and then furnished the treat after the quiet period. Gradually, I increased the duration the dog had to be quiet before getting the treat. Soon, the treat was not used to elicit the quiet, just the cue word was. The treat was still given, but retrieved from somewhere else, not held in my hand. Then eventually, it was put on a variable reinforcement schedule. "Enough" (or whatever cue one uses) comes to have "great" meaning. To stop whatever it is the dog is doing = a big pay off.

    Teaching the dog to bark on cue as well, is also part of this method. Making it less rewardable, but still...mild praise is used. 1) Cue to bark, 2) prompt bark, (quickly/immediately after cue) 3) mild, "good dog." The cueing quiet, prompting quiet, rewarding with high value treat for being quiet. Getting the dog to volley back and forth between cued barking and cued stopping is the game. The contrast assists in the dog's learning.

    It's important not to let the dog practice the behavior of incessant barking. And that any underlying causes be dealt with besides the training. For example: If a dog is upset or reacting to a neighbor's dog behind a fence. There is then some additional conditioning to be done by changing the dog's mind about the dog behind the fence....marking and rewarding the dog when he first orients to the stimuli but BEFORE he barks....starting at milder levels of stimulation and working up.
     
  12. Maura

    Maura New Member

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    Thank you Doberluv. The OP yells at her dog to stop barking.

    The dog isn't rewarded for barking. He is rewarded after his attention is diverted (sniff the treat). To expound, you would use the training at the first or second bark, certainly before your dog is past the threshold of pure focus on whatever he is barking at.
     
  13. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    Really? That's not what I read. :confused:
     
  14. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    this ^

    or my personal favorite

    "It is 7 oclock in the **** MORNING, next dog who barks is going to the VET AND THE GROOMERS JUST FOR THE HELL OF IT! I SWEAR TO GOD!!"

    ..they usually get the point.
     
  15. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    I love positive reinforcement methods for many reasons. With this bark training example, you're getting the dog to stop, but you're not punishing. There's no threat, no hollering, no confusion. You're giving an alternative which is highly rewardable.

    By teaching "enough" in this context, my dogs have been able to generalize that to other behaviors...where I want them to stop something and do something else instead...for example: incessant licking or sometimes when they're finished with their meal, they'll keep on licking the bowls for way too long. It looks like they're trying to lick off the design etched into the metal. LOL. That stainless steel crashing around gets annoying. So, I'll say, "enough" and they and walk away from their bowls. Then I'll praise and maybe ask them to come see me for a scritch behind the ears. So, it seems they're able to generalize better, once they start the hang of learning that way. Like "leave it," I've found "enough" to be versatile and handy. I have experienced that dogs trained using PR type methods seem to learn how to generalize better than dogs trained more compulsively. They just learn HOW to learn better.

    The problem with punishment, even mild, is that barking is not a totally unwanted behavior. At least, for mosts dog owners. We generally like them to bark to alert us to intruders or something else that is wrong. Or we might like a little barking when they're playing with us...having fun. They're expressing themselves. So, since it's not a behavior that is a no no all the time, punishing it doesn't make sense and is confusing to a dog. This is why teaching a rewardable cue, associating that word with a big pay off works so beautifully. You can just say the word inoccuously, in a normal speaking voice. If you think of it like you're not so much stopping the barking, but instead, you're starting the quiet, it helps lower the frustration. You're giving a rewardable alternative.

    This ignoring only works to discourage barking when it is demand barking...to get your attention. If the dog is getting a real charge out of hearing himself bark or he's upset/anxious/excited about something, ignoring isn't going to make him stop because he's getting a comfort, outlet... some kind of reinforcement from the barking itself.
     
  16. BostonBanker

    BostonBanker Active Member

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    I've found that Meg's very strong "leave it" command carries over nicely to stopping her barking when she is focused on something. It gets her to turn away and look at me for a moment, so I have that quick break to keep her attention and reward it.
     
  17. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    That's so true BB. That's good. I use "leave it" too if they're focused on something that's making them bark. Sometimes they're just yapping about something non-descript. LOL. Then I tend to tell them, "enough." Both work because both get their attention off the barking and onto something else which has proven to be more reinforcing to them, more valuable to them.
     

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