Please READ! Parable of the last COYOTE....

Discussion in 'Buried Bones' started by Red_ACD_for_me, Aug 13, 2007.

  1. Red_ACD_for_me

    Red_ACD_for_me Ruled by a RED boy!

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    This just gave me the chills and brought a tear to my eye as I read......It is so true :( I thought I would share.

    Parable of the Last Coyote -- Meg Scott
    Tampa Tribune, August 10, 2007

    We moved to Florida five years ago with a great appreciation for its lush, natural beauty and abundance of wildlife, and I vowed, just before buying our pre-owned home nestled among immense trees, to leave as small a foot print on natural habitats as a size nine flip flop can possibly make. I understood too well and too late what happens when we human beings don't do that.

    I'm ashamed to admit that, once upon a time, in the name of progress, I inadvertently helped destroy one of the most beautiful Texas meadows ever created, an act that became tragic and real only after I'd lived each day watching animals struggle to survive then disappear, knowing that I was a part of the destruction chain.

    Our house was the first one built in the meadow that would quickly become a large gated subdivision with fenced yards. For two years as it built around us, we watched and learned what really happens when "civilization" arrives.

    In the beginning, hawks soared high over the meadow and coyotes sang us to sleep at night. During the day when I'd take my dogs down to the creek to sit amid wildflowers under giant oak trees, we'd see deer or rabbits peek out at us as well as other small critters. Every day we'd greet two old cow dogs that had once run cattle across that meadow. The two scruffy, confused, old wranglers still took morning walks down to the creek, no doubt wondering what had happened to their wide open home on the range. They'd lived rough and long, but they didn't know about dodging cars and construction trucks now lumbering across the meadow.

    One of the cow dogs was the first meadow casualty. We saw his old companion sad and alone at the creek bank one morning, then we found him lying close to the road. After that, his old friend came to the creek once or twice, then disappeared as well.

    Rabbits were increasingly forced to live out in the open as fences went up around their former habitats. One of them I named Mazie would stand at my fence gate and wait for carrots and lettuce each evening. There wasn't much else left for her to eat. Twice she came into my backyard to deliver her bunnies. One day, she too disappeared.

    Although most people wouldn't categorize me as a sentimentalist, the tragedy and irony of that meadow taught me what may have been the greatest lesson of my life.

    I noticed over time that the only things growing fatter around our meadow-in-transition were the hawks and the coyotes. Small animals didn't have a chance. One of the coyotes grew into a huge, magnificent, proud creature - King of the Meadow. While my neighbors and I mourned the loss of small creatures, we still thrilled in catching a glimpse of that wild creature stalking the neighborhood at night. His fur grew thick, his eyes bright. He became more wolf than coyote and the pride of the subdivision. Something wild had survived us - for a while.

    One day as we drove home to our completed subdivision, we noticed cars moving slowly around something lying in the road near the entrance. No one blew horns or resorted to road rage as they gazed down at the road where he lay - the last coyote, lying there still except for the wind blowing through his thick gray fur. Everyone gazed sadly, silently, even respectfully upon this last wild thing.

    And so the new school came to serve the people of the former meadow, and with that came the businesses to support those who now lived in the former meadow. Traffic increased, and one day not long after the last coyote died, the first human traffic fatality occurred at the intersection. And we, the people who had moved to the meadow for its natural beauty and its slower pace discovered that we had built the thing we'd fled.

    And with the coming of spring that year, on our evening walks, we noticed that the other walkers around us were no longer friendly strollers aware of and soothed by any beauty around them, but were instead speed-walkers timed to wrist watches, panting and sweating in the stifling heat rising from the concrete meadow.

    Until someone with the power and the will to be heard yells, "Stop! This is madness," development of what should be protected will continue, and when it does, no one wins. We all lose.
     
  2. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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  3. Red_ACD_for_me

    Red_ACD_for_me Ruled by a RED boy!

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    WOW! Renee....I didn't think it would be stickied :yikes: that's great! Thanks :)
     
  4. yoko

    yoko New Member

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    i know what you are talking about. i now live on 3 acres. and m friends around here all live on 30 or more acres. so i can always get away with going out and seeing the wildlife. i would NEVER give this place up. ever. when i was younger i only wanted to move to the city for an exciting life. but now i would rather die than leave my tiny little town.
     
  5. GipsyQueen

    GipsyQueen Active Member

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    Wow, that is really sad! But a "wonderful" story, because unfortunatly its true! I remember one morning while we were still living in the USA when at 6 in the morning there was a coyote just lying on our front lawn and sleeping. He slept in our front lawn for months, and never did anything to us because we had respect and held our distance. After all he was there first. Then our neighbors notices and asked us why we didn't do anything about him, he was dangerous! We just told her was there first, and that he didn't do anything. After about 4 months he didn't return and we saw him run over a few miles away. :(
     
  6. Aussie Red

    Aussie Red Rebel With Cause

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    I only wish more people would see this and hear the message. Population of our own and what we want must slow down. Makes me glad I am the age I am because I won't be here to see the destruction.
     
  7. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Well, it's important!
     
  8. emma3j

    emma3j New Member

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    Helo
    Thanks for sharing
     
  9. Boemy

    Boemy New Member

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    That is so beautiful, but so sad. And so true. :(

    I grew up in a suburban area, but two blocks away was a small, thin, long national park. The reason it was shaped like that was because it mostly encompassed a very steep hillside marking where the glaciers that had shaped the land had halted. If you climbed the hill, you were moving vertically more than you were moving forward, that's how steep it was. No one could ever have built anything there which I'm sure is why it became a national park to begin with.

    Anyway, I would go there often, walking or biking along the ridge or taking Ebony on a hike down the trails. Back then even the land below the park was wild too. Pine trees right to the horizon, except a bare strip where the big powerlines were set up. But gradually houses began growing as well as trees . . . Ten or twelve at a time, all with a disturbing sameness to them. More and more and more. Then the land below the park, where the river ran wild, was turned into a golf course. More houses appeared. More roads. A big box store. Fast food.

    The national park is still there. No one will ever be able to build anything on it, and thank God. But I don't walk along the ridge any more. It tears my heart, walking there at night and not being able to see the stars for the streetlights. It makes me so angry. They had a whole, huge city they could have built in, renovated (God knows parts of it need it!), lived in, but no, they had to go ruin that valley.
     
  10. Xerxes

    Xerxes Mr Poopy

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    Thank you for posting that. Powerful words, powerful deeds.
     

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