Ok, I need help!

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Cheza, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. Cheza

    Cheza New Member

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    I went to see Lyra last night again, and it's becoming painfully obvious that something's wrong with her hearing. My guess is she is congenitally deaf. It was mostly obvious when it was just me and all of the litter in the box, no one else in the room. Every single puppy was sound asleep.

    The door opened, and every single puppy immediately woke and clambered toward the door, except for Lyra, who remained in a sound sleep until I nudged her awake a good 10 seconds or so later.

    Aside from that she seems very healthy, she eats like a pig, loves to play and is very fond of people.

    I've been doing a lot of reading, and am building on the knowledge I prepped myself with before Cheza came home but that was almost 2 years ago. The website deafdogs.org is REALLY helpful, but I would welcome any and all advice about training and living with a dog that can't hear; books, websites, personal experience. From what I gather it's a great experience and I'm looking forward to it, but I want to be prepared as well.

    Here's a couple of up to date pictures of her:
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    Thanks so much everyone,
    -L
     
  2. dr2little

    dr2little Moderator

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    That puppy is just stunning!!!

    I have trained a number of deaf dogs over the years and I can tell you honestly that if you start when they're puppies, it's really not so different from training a hearing dog.

    What I've found works well is to have them fitted very early with a vibration collar. You can use hand signals (thumbs up is my marker) or a flashlight the exact same way as a clicker so shaping and luring is very similar.
    The vibration collar, while others use it differently, I use it only for attention. The earlier that you start them (8 weeks is great) the better.

    Deafdog.org I believe even has directions on how to make your own Vib. collar (no shock option of course), and like you've said they have some great info.

    This little dolly knows more and is more reliable than her hearing brother.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    She's as cute as a button !!! Are you still taking her if she is deaf ??? What does the breeder say ?? I sure hope she doesn't charge you if she is deaf .
     
  4. Cheza

    Cheza New Member

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    Thanks Dr2, and that dog looks like such a sweetheart.

    I ams looking into vibrating collars, hoping I can find one that isn't too heavy. I was also planning to use it just as an attention getter. I would like it to have a tone (no shock) as well so if I can't find her I can at least hear the beep.

    Grammy, she is mine and I wouldn't have it any other way, I'm still just as excited about bringing her home. If you want more details about the breeder PM me :)
     
  5. dr2little

    dr2little Moderator

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    I'm sure that with all of your preparation and determination to make her life wonderful, she'll do great. Yes, the tone is very important too. Also, your other girl will be a tremendous help with training....Great Dane see...Great Dane doooo!;)

    I'm so excited to watch your blue eyed beauty grow...

    If there's anything I can help you with, let me know.
     
  6. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    No need for me to ! Bless you and good luck ! You'll do fine !
     
  7. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    Other than stuff you probably already know, make sure to use your hand signals for everyday things too, not just training. A signal for a greeting perhaps, maybe a signal you use before petting so you can show her when you want some loving, a signal you use before play etc. just like people say certain things or talk in certain ways to rile the dog up for a game or invite him for a cuddle, you can and should do that too. Also be sure to use facial expressions when using hand signals so she still learns to read you and your body/facial language.

    She is growing into a beautiful pup, I can't wait to see her all grown up! I'll need a picture of you walking your two white Danes down the street. It must be soooo great to live close to the breeder and be a real part of her life so early, she looks like she already loves you!
     
  8. dr2little

    dr2little Moderator

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  9. Its one of my faves. :)
     
  10. arklady

    arklady Ark Lady

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    You can use signals and vibration to communicate. I did an evaluation on a dog who could not hear and he picked up signals quickly with the reinforcement. It just requires that you be a bit more attentive and teach others to use the same tools.

    Here is a great site for tips and hints: http://www.deafdogs.org/training/
     

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