Neutering

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by Blondie, Mar 15, 2004.

  1. Blondie

    Blondie New Member

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    My puppy's almost 3 months old and I've considered neutering him. I really want to know if it's NECESSARY. I know it's convenient. People have told me that, but I'd like to hear your opinions. What if I don't want to have him neutered? What kind of consequences may we have? Thanks people for your patience and guidance! :cool:
     
  2. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Okay, the first question is always, do you want to him to breed? The next thing to consider is are you equipped to keep him from escaping and running after any nearby females in season? You're not just concerned about unwanted puppy populations, but about the dangers to your own dog following a female. He will get into fights with larger dogs. He may get hit by a car crossing a road because he will be following his instincts and he won't be using his brain at all. Or he could cause someone to wreck, and if it's discovered he's your dog, you're legally responsible for damages. He may get picked up by the pound, and even if you find him and retrieve him, he could easily pick up any number of illnesses while he's there. He may even get shot or poisoned by some idiot for being a nuisance.

    Okay, those are the worst-case scenarios.

    On the practical side, he'll be less prone to try to be domineering and less likely to want to wander in search of adventure if he's neutered.

    I've had male dogs who were neutered at an early age, after adulthood and a couple who remained intact. People will try to scare you and tell you that if you neuter a male dog he won't be a good watchdog, or he'll get lazy and fat or other dogs will pick on him. I've never found any of those things to be true. Your dog is who he is. Granted, less testosterone in his system will mean he is less aggressive - to other dogs, not to someone or something that threatens you. If he's a brave little fellow, he'll be brave no matter what.
    You might want to discuss this with your vet just to get an educated opinion from another source. But, in the long run, it's your decision. The only thing you are obligated to do is be responsible for his health and well-being, which is obviously something you're very conscientious about.
     
  3. chazhound

    chazhound Alpha Dog Staff Member

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    I used to never neuter my dogs when I was growing up. We lived in
    a rual area so we didn't have to worry much about the dangers of
    following the scent. But now that I am a city boy, I neuter them because
    as Renee noted, there is just too many things that could go wrong in a
    dense population with dogs and cats everywhere. My dogs don't seem
    to mind at all. I can't tell any difference in personality.

    Chazhound
     
  4. Blondie

    Blondie New Member

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    Okay people,thank you very much for your kind advice! You're really helpful.

    No,I wasn't considering breeding. Actually, I'd much prefer him NOT to breed, because all of the problems that you mentioned plus others of my own concern. But like you all know, I never had a puppy before so I don't know much about this kind of things, and I was worrying about the anesthesia part, and the drugs he might get if he gets the surgery done, and the wound and pain he might feel... I might not be able to control him 24/7 as not to jump,or run because I work and I'm not at home with him all day. That's what truly concerns me, but I guess you've got the best points! Thanks again for your help. :)
     
  5. Jerseygirl

    Jerseygirl New Member

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    I have to agree neutering is the best way to go. When you have no intentions of breeding that is. It also prevents any type of cancer forming from the testorone problems that occur. I use to think only females had the problems with cancerous tumors when not spayed. My vet advises me that the male also has the same problem with not spaying. For health reasons alone that convinced me to have them spayed/neutered. Gail
     
  6. dee_9125

    dee_9125 New Member

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    get him done as soon as they drop it is much better for the dog because he doesnt know what they are there for and wont miss them,but if you have any concernes then talk to your vet. im sure they will be happy that you asked rather than just assumed.
     
  7. Sorgoth

    Sorgoth New Member

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    To the person who suggested homeopathic medicines:

    There is very little evidence that they work at all on animals (They work on humans with placebo-like effects).

    Also, I recommend doing a bit of research on homeopathy... while it doesn't HURT your dog, as it's just water or a sugar pill, but it doesn't help all that much either (Anecdotal evidence doesn't count).

    Homeopathy is the theory that the more you dilute something, the more strong it becomes. This set me off right away, so I did some more research.

    For example, one homeopathic 'remedy' that uses an extract from a duck's liver dilutes it SO MUCH that one duck is good for the entire year's (million dollar) sales.

    In fact, there is a fairly good chance that none of the acting agent is even in that medicine.

    Not trying to attack you or anything, just suggesting you do a bit of research into how (And why) it would work.
     
  8. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Homeopathy, in its properly used sense, is not a theory of something becoming stronger through dilution. Vaccinations are a form of homeopathy. A diluted or otherwise weakened form of the irritant is used to stimulate the body to build its own natural defenses in response to the stimulus. Thus, a weakened substance makes the body's ability to defend against it stronger.

    No, homeopathy does not work in every situation. Yes, it most emphatically DOES work for humans and other mammals when used appropriately.

    Homeopathy does not mask symptoms that might alert you to a potential problem, as do many chemically compounded conventional treatments, nor does it cause the horrendous side effects (when used properly) that some of our medical "miracle drugs" leave us with.

    Yes, quackery has crept into homeopathy and other forms of alternative and natural medicine, but it is not representative of the principles behind those practices. One should always perform due diligence before undertaking any kind of treatment, especially when it involves an animal that can't tell you specifically when something is not right. The same due diligence is required, perhaps even more strongly, when dealing with "modern" medicine. Medicine, both veterinary and human, is rife with horrendous mistakes and malfeasance. That's one reason a forum like this is so helpful; it's a place where anyone can come if they are unsure or uncomfortable and have a sounding board and possibly find new information.

    Incidentally, and I know you're new to the forum and will appreciate this more as you read more of her posts, Serena is quite knowledgeable and is an extremely reliable and valuable source of accurate information.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2004

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