need advice

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by bookofshadow, Jul 25, 2012.

  1. bookofshadow

    bookofshadow New Member

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    I need advice on how to train my 7 month old pitador Inori. She is a hyper, playful, outside pup. I've tried using my step dad's advice but it's not working and have stopped.
     
  2. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    How to Choose a Dog Trainer: Click here.

    Dog Trainer Search: click here.
     
  3. bookofshadow

    bookofshadow New Member

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    I want to train my girl myself.
     
  4. Kilter

    Kilter New Member

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    Take classes! Most dog training classes teach YOU how to teach your dog - they don't take the leash and do it, they have you come into a group and work with other dogs and progress through training. Books and internet is fine for some things, but if you don't have a lot of experience it's worth it to have someone there going through it in person and making sure you have it right.

    There are a lot of different methods and ideas out there, some work, some not so much, and it also depends on the dog. There is no 'canned training' where the same methods work for every dog in the same way. I will tell one person in a class to do one thing then tell the next person something totally different because the dogs are different...

    And welcome to the forum!
     
  5. ihartgonzo

    ihartgonzo and Fozzie B!

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    Why is she an outside dog? How much time, REALLY, do you spend outside? How much and what kind of exercise does she get each day? How many times a day do you walk her?

    Most dog owners find that their outside dogs are wild and ill-mannered, simply because the dog isn't spending enough time around people to understand what is polite behavior. Dogs are not born knowing how we want them to behave. They are born bouncy, energetic, impulsive and hyper!!! It is your job to direct her energy into productive mental and physical exercise, to spend time to create an understanding, respectful bond, and to BE THERE to guide and teach your puppy what human beings see as right from wrong.

    Being outside in a yard, alone, for 23 hours a day, makes dogs go stir crazy. I raised a GSD puppy in my home for 6 months. He was a perfectly trained, well behaved, delightful puppy. Then I gave him to his owner, who kept him as an outside dog. Even with acres of property to run around on and his new owner spending a couple hours a day outside with him, the dog went nearly FERAL being left to his own devices all day/night during his adolescence. No one was there to tell him not to chew on something, and redirect him to an appropriate thing to chew on. No one was there to reward him for sitting and calming down, or teach him that controlling his impulses is the only way to get what he wants. When his owner did come out to play with him, he was overcome with excitement and would jump all over him and mouth him. He got to a point where it was DANGEROUS to meet him, not because he was aggressive, but because he was a rude, hyper, untrained 100 lb puppy who would throw himself on you and mouth you to the point of bruises and cuts. This puppy was never mouthy or jumpy when I had him!!! He was gentle, respectful and calm. I was always there with him, guiding him and rewarding him for good behavior, and redirecting him from poor behavior. Just interacting with him! He was in his crate chewing on a raw bone/napping if I wasn't home, so he couldn't destroy anything or develop bad habits. His new owner now keeps him inside, except when he's guarding the property outside, and his behavior has drastically improved.

    Raising a puppy into a wonderful, well adjusted, obedient adult is all about putting in time. No matter what training method you use, if you aren't THERE to be consistent and to teach your puppy what you want, they're going to revert to instincts... which to us means rude behavior. What I always try to remember in training a puppy is that it's much more effective to show and reward your dog for what you WANT them to do, rather than correct them for what you DON'T want.

    Why is she an outside dog? If you think about it... what is the point of having a dog if they aren't with you? I would highly recommend bringing your puppy inside, when you are home. Make sure she has gone potty and is tired from playing, then bring her inside and chill with her. During commercial breaks, get a handful of tiny cheese cubes and reward her for sitting, laying down, coming to you, etc. Keep it to several 10 minute training sessions a day, and she will learn commands in no time! The more time she spends around you, the less excitable she will be when she sees you, and the more time you have to train her and teach her manners. Give her plenty of exercise through out the day - both physical exercise and mental. Playing with other puppies and friendly dogs is great exercise, plus it will teach her manners and bite inhibition. Take her to the park on a long line (30-50' leash) and run around with her and explore. Call her back to you, run the other way, and give her lots of praise and treats to teach her to come when called and stay near you. Introduce her to as many people and other dogs as possible. If she jumps on people, tell them to turn around and ignore her. She needs to learn that jumping up on people is NOT rewarding. Dogs do what is rewarding... the idea is to prevent her from doing what you don't want, and setting her up for success and rewarding her for doing what you want her to. Bring a bag of tons of tiny treats (chicken, hotdog, cheese) on every walk and give her rewards for heeling... that's walking next to your left side. Practice sit, lay down, and eye contact and reward her often to keep her interest. Every time she pulls on the leash stop walking! Call her to you, then proceed. She needs to learn that taut leash = stop walking. My dogs believe that as a law of nature, so they always walk with a loose leash. It's frustrating at first, but it's awesome in the end to have a dog who never pulls on leash and stays right by you.

    This is a great e-book about the basics of training and raising a puppy! It's only $10! http://store.clickertraining.com/pu...ion-training-for-the-companion-dog-ebook.html You CAN train your puppy yourself, but you need to do your research to understand the scientific facts behind dog behavior and effective training. Don't just go by what whoever tells you... go by what professionals say, who have years of experience and PhDs to back them up.
     
  6. bookofshadow

    bookofshadow New Member

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    I spend a lot of time with her and take her for daily walks. I also lets her off her chain(don't like her being chained but we have no fence) and play with her or let her play with my brother's dog.
     
  7. crysania

    crysania New Member

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    I'd hate to come down hard on this but the dogs who are the #1 most aggressive dogs are dogs who are chained. The chain creates a barrier where the dog can see much but can't get to it and it creates serious frustration. That frustration often leads to aggression. Being chained for a dog is about the worst thing you can do to a dog.
     
  8. MafiaPrincess

    MafiaPrincess Obvious trollsare Obvious

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    Pitbull lab cross. Not designer mutt. People will take you more seriously sans the cutsey name.
     
  9. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    Use a trainer...you still train her yourself but a trainer teaches YOU how to do it.

    I dont know where in SC you are but this is a start:)
    http://www.thepuppynanny.net/
     
  10. yoko

    yoko New Member

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    It sounds like this might a kid. So the where the dog is kept may not be up to them.
     
  11. bookofshadow

    bookofshadow New Member

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    I'm 21 but at home with my folks, and she's outside mainly because she wouldn't give my brother's dog any rest. Also we don't like chaining her up but it's the only option right now. Also it doesn't matter what ppl think, pit/lab cross or pitador it's all the same. Chihuahua/dachshund mix is called a chiwennie.
     
  12. FidoFitness

    FidoFitness FidoFitness

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    Wow - I'm a dog trainer and I don't know what that is!? What place of orgin does this dog come from and what was the purpose of it's breeding?


    Well, the first question I have is what is your dad's advice and what is his experience training dogs?

    Dog training has evolved in the past 20 years and new science (or actually old science newly applied to dogs) has proven many of the old assumptions wrong.
    However, no matter what method of training you are using, if you are not being consistent, it will not work. I often catch my clients being unknowingly inconsistent with their dogs. Half the job of a dog trainer is to teach the owners the best way to teach their dogs. It is very helpful to take a dog training class. If you are tight on money, you may want to see if there is 4H, girl/boy scouts or even a petco or petsmart or community center class being offered near you. One or two classes just to go over the basics and shore up your consistency with your dog may be very helpful.

    I posted in another forum a wonderful resource I use to learn more about dog training - bowwowflix.com
     

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