NADAC, signing up for

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by AdrianneIsabel, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    8,893
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 Pit bulls and 2 Malinois, We like to stay busy.
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Home Page:
    I need a little help understanding my form being filed for the NADAC. Under "Skilled" (which I would like to run her since this is her first trial) it only has jump heights up to 16" and then the next box is **. She's a 23" dog, is Skilled @ 16" the correct setting for her?

    Also, how many runs do you do a day? How many for a first time dog?
     
  2. MandyPug

    MandyPug Sport Model Pug

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,332
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    1
    Location:
    Southern Alberta
    Izzie's first trial was local (as in 15 minutes from my driveway to the trial site) and I did only one jumpers run each day. If I had to travel for it I'd probably have done more to make it worthwhile to go.

    We worked up to 3 runs per day (out of a possible 4) now and I don't think I'll ever run her in 4 a day.

    ETA: keep in mind this is for AAC not NADAC. Not sure how those ones run and the difficulty of their novice stuff.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2012
  3. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    Messages:
    2,270
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    several
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Home Page:
    I usually run my dogs in the Novice level first (AKC Novice, CPE Level 3, UAG1) and run them in whatever is available the days I'm going. I generally jump them full height from the start of trialing too. Whim's first trial she did four runs in two days then the same for her second trial. She would have had no issues running more than that though, that's just all that was offered :) In her first three trials she jumped 20" twice and 24" once (we had some issues in AKC because she is right on the cut off between heights).

    It depends on the dog and the person though. I don't enter my dogs until I'm sure they are ready but many, many people tend to want to enter their dogs ASAP. Or some dogs for whatever reason just need a slower start to trialing. Or some people do! I have suggested to some newbie handlers start in CPE level 1 because it's a nice introductory level for a first timer. Most of the hard stuff with agility is the person getting confidence and handling ability, so a level like that is a great starting point. I'm not familiar with NADAC's system but I'm guessing Skilled is similar in that it's meant to be an easy, straight forward beginner level?

    So I guess the number of classes you should enter depends on if you're confident that Sloan is really ready to trial. If you are just entering to see how she does and you're not totally sure she's ready, I'd probably do just one run and in whatever you think she's most likely to succeed in. If she turns out not to be ready, you don't want her repeatedly practicing bad behaviors in a trial setting. If you're pretty confident that she is ready and will not have issues with anything you ask her to do - enter whatever sounds fun :)
     
  4. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    3,415
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    fiver
    Location:
    B-ville
    Home Page:
    16" is what she'd jump in skilled. I like to enter the classes I feel confident in handling. A lot of people say "do tunnelers because it's fun" and while it IS fun, it's definitely a different handling style than if you've only run "standard/regular" type sequences before.

    I personally started my dogs in jumpers and regular. I started with 1-2 runs/day and worked up to 4/day from there.

    NADAC courses are designed to be short and fast... :) I think you and Sloan'll have fun!
     
  5. CaliTerp07

    CaliTerp07 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,652
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Just Miss Lucy-fur, my wondermutt!
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Yup, 16" is the highest for skilled. I copied the parts of the premium from 2 local NADAC trials here that make that pretty clear.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I signed Lucy up for everything to start with, because the closest trials are almost 2 hours away, and I wasn't going to drive 2 hours for a 30 second run and then come back. If you don't mind doing that, or if the trial is closer to home, my trainer suggests just entering in Tunnelers, since that's a really reinforcing, fun game. Touch N Go is fun too, if you have a "termite" (wood sucker!) Or do chances, and totally ignore the distance line. That's usually a pretty easy course once you take out the distance piece.
     
  6. MandyPug

    MandyPug Sport Model Pug

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,332
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    1
    Location:
    Southern Alberta
    The main reason I advocate for not jumping in both feet and entering a full trial from the get go is it's a much different environment from practise and it's a very long day. I don't expect my dog to be used to that from the get go and I want to gradually work them up to it and not just expect them to be okay with a super long and taxing day. I want to set my dog up to be successful and not overwhelm them.

    And for the record i'd do that with ANY breed i had, not just Izzie.
     
  7. elegy

    elegy overdogged

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2006
    Messages:
    7,720
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Home Page:
    What is the difference between skilled and proficient?
     
  8. CaliTerp07

    CaliTerp07 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,652
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Just Miss Lucy-fur, my wondermutt!
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Skilled jumps a lower height and gets a few extra seconds of course time. The dogs I know who run it are a mastiff who needs the extra time and a mix who isn't built very well for jumping.
     
  9. elegy

    elegy overdogged

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2006
    Messages:
    7,720
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Home Page:
    Ah, so then I should go ahead and enter Steve in Proficient when we get there. I'm hoping for June. We'll see. NADAC seems pretty beginner-friendly, so I'm planning to start there. (NOT with tunnellers! Maybe Jumpers, Standard, and Weavers since he's a weave sucker.)
     
  10. CaliTerp07

    CaliTerp07 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,652
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Just Miss Lucy-fur, my wondermutt!
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Yes! So beginner friendly! Everyone has always been so kind and so helpful, which was not my experience being green in usdaa or akc :(
     
  11. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    Messages:
    2,270
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    several
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Home Page:
    It could be because of all the other stuff I do with my dogs but they don't find trials or shows to be all that stressful. Of course, they are socialized at them as young puppies having to hang out at them all day and we go to conformation shows, overnight trips, more conformation shows, more agility trials, multiple training venues, adventures in strange places, etc. Going to dog shows/trials is part of life from the very start.

    Whimsy was trained almost entirely in my backyard and is extremely reliable at trials and has been since her first trial. I took her to one workshop, a few run-thrus at the two local training places and one outdoor run thru then starting trialing her. I just don't see trials as that big of a deal for most well socialized, well trained dogs providing they enjoy the game and have been trained well enough. I'm not sure Whim has ever even noticed people in the ring or anything going on outside of the ring at a trial, which many people would say would be a drawback of backyard only training. She knows her job is to run and she is very focused on that task :)

    IME Many cases of trial stress seem to stem from training issues or not being fit enough for the task. People around here always seem so eager to start trialing without thinking about the fact that they can't reliably keep their dog's attention for short sequences in training or the dog isn't confident on all equipment or doesn't jump real well. They enter their dogs and hope they don't make too many mistakes to Q. They repeated allow the dog to run around the ring, visit judges and ring crew and do everything but focus on running with them. Those dogs, I agree shouldn't be entered in multiple classes. Those things quickly turn into hard to break habits. I'd argue they shouldn't be entered at all until they're ready though.

    Of course, some dogs have different individual needs that make it more ideal to get into trialing slowly and carefully. I know a few seasoned agility dogs who still struggle with more than a couple runs day. And some people too LOL

    In this case, I don't imagine Adrianne is entering a dog who she doesn't feel is ready and Sloan seems like a well socialized dog that does lots of stuff. I don't think I'd worry that she will be overwhelmed by the trialing environment but I don't know her and could be wrong. But I think this is Adrianne's first ever agility trial? If so, I think she should enter the class or classes that she feels most comfortable running. The first trials can be quite stressful for humans ;)
     

Share This Page