How important is VR?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by xpaeanx, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. xpaeanx

    xpaeanx Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    Messages:
    8,387
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
  2. AndrewF

    AndrewF MIiA

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Messages:
    4,003
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Pets???? It's a f****** zoo!
    Location:
    The great whi...err...green(?) North
    At 300mm and f/5.6, VR will help quite a bit. That said, I'm not sure I'd want to spend THAT much more for it. You could buy an excellent tripod and head for less than $390. You could buy a better all around lens for around that much.

    As much as I like both Canon's and Nikon's lens-based stablization, in consumer lenses the cost is overkill.

    Just my opinion though. If it's something you'll use more than a faster lens or a tripod, then it might be well worth the money for you. :)
     
  3. xpaeanx

    xpaeanx Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    Messages:
    8,387
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I'm just getting started in this... so I honestly don't know what is/isn't important to me.

    How much does it "help." I mean, I'm not doing this professionally. Any pictures I take will probably only make it 3 places: Chaz, myspace, and framed in my house. So if it only helps a little bit... maybe it would be better if I got the cheaper one?

    Right now all I have is a 28-70mm. I was thinking a 70-300mm would be nice to add now since I mostly do wildlife stuff... There were quite a few shots I wanted but was so mad I couldn't zoom close enough... :(
     
  4. AndrewF

    AndrewF MIiA

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Messages:
    4,003
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Pets???? It's a f****** zoo!
    Location:
    The great whi...err...green(?) North
    Wildlife photography it tricky, so I'll give you a bit of my procedure on shooting birds and how shake-reduction (the Pentax equivalent of VR) helps out.

    First off, shake-reduction will allow you about 2-3 stops extra of being able to hand-hold a camera for a shot. The general rule is if you're using a 300mm lens, your slowest shutter speed to hand-hold is about 1/300th of a second. With Shake-reduction, you can get away with a shutter speed of around 1/75th or 1/50th of a second. This will yield sharper images if you're in poor light and allow you to use a lower ISO for better overall quality. However, shake-reduction only helps you out. If you're naturally jittery, you might only be able to get away with 1/150th of a second.

    What VR won't do is freeze motion blur from your subject moving. This means if a deer moves it's head while you're exposure is going, you'll still end up with a blurred picture.

    All that being said, I use shake-reduction and a tripod when I shoot birds because the mirror-slap will mess up critical focus when I'm around 1/60th of a second on up to 1/200th of a second. The tripod keeps things stable and the SR keeps the vibrations from the mirror-slap from messing me up. I also put a hand on my lens (over the point where the tripod head fastens to my lens - not an issue for your lens) to help dampen vibrations from the camera.

    If you're thinking this will be "the one" wildlife lens and thats where your main interest lies, then VR would help you out quite a bit and you'll be glad you spent the extra up-front. If you're thinking this will hold you over for a year or two, then get the cheap one and save up for a fast lens.

    Cheers! :)
     

Share This Page