How do you feed/care for newborn puppies?

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by Fran101, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    I start volunteering at Miami Dade A.S on sunday, before the "puppy program" began, all new born orphan puppies that couldnt eat by themselves were put to sleep. but now they have a program where volunteers can feed them/care for them (and find homes for them). I think its awesome and I want to be part of it since they NEED people to do it

    thankfully, i go to a school where taking puppies to school is not a problem and leaving class every 3 hours to feed them isnt a problem eether. we have an animal rights club and rescue is something we do all the time (im the president) so taking the newborn pups to school and feeding them while im there isnt a problem

    but trouble is, i dont know how to deal with orphan puppies
    how to house them
    how to feed them
    what to feed them
    how to make them go potty
    ect. ect..

    any help would be great. the shelter just hands you a box of puppies and a contract to give the future owners

    thanks so much
     
  2. Juicy

    Juicy New Member

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    How old are the pups do you know? Is it before they have their eyes open?


    and a little thread-hijack, but this is so sad, I remember seeing this little one too!!

    BUTCH NO LONGER WITH US
     
  3. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    You have to put your mind set into a a new Mommy dog . Stimulate to poop and pee and alot of TLC. I've never brought up orphaned pups , but know that besides feeding , they need alot of stimulation . Good luck !!!
     
  4. Juicy

    Juicy New Member

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    Newborn Puppy Care


    During the first few weeks of life, a puppy’s primary activities are feeding, keeping warm and developing social skills. In most cases, humans will simply watch the mother dog provide all necessary care for her puppies. However, if the puppy in your care has been separated from his mother, or if the mother dog has rejected her young or cannot produce enough milk, caring for the pup is up to you.

    How Do I Feed a Newborn Puppy?
    A mother dog’s milk provides everything the pups need during their first four weeks of life. If you are caring for an orphan or the mother is out of the picture, consult with a veterinarian for guidance on the proper way to bottle-feed newborns, as it is easy to cause harm by doing it incorrectly. The babies will need to be fed a commercial canine milk replacer. Be sure to use one specifically formulated for puppies, as cow’s milk and other milk replacer can cause diarrhea.

    Puppies will need bottle or syringe feeding every few hours for several weeks.

    How Often Should a Puppy Eat?
    Puppies generally nurse at least every two hours in their first week of life. As they develop and grow, the intervals between feedings increase. At around four weeks of age, puppies can begin to transition from nursing to eating solid food. When making the transition to solid food, a high-quality dry puppy kibble can be soaked with warm water and milk replacer and blended to the consistency of gruel. This can be made available several times a day. Gradually, the amount of milk replacer can be decreased until the puppies are eating dry kibble by about 7 to 8 weeks of age. Consult your veterinarian for the exact amount to feed and for help creating a long-term feeding schedule suited to the puppies’ development needs.

    How Much Should a Newborn Puppy Weigh?
    The average birth weight for puppies depends on breed. During the first weeks of life, a pup’s body weight may double or even triple. Gaining 10 to 15% of birth weight daily is considered healthy. Pups who don’t gain adequate weight during this early period may not survive.

    Should I Hold the Puppy?
    Puppies should not be overhandled during their first two weeks of life, and care should always be taken not to upset the mother dog when handling. If you are hand-raising pups, handle them only as much as is necessary to keep them warm, clean and fed for the first two weeks of life.

    Make sure they are staying warm at this tender age—a well-monitored heating pad or warm water bottle wrapped in a towel will do the trick. Starting at three weeks of age, try to gently handle the puppies in short sessions a few times every day—this is around the time their vision and hearing are kicking in and their teeth are beginning to develop and is considered an important time for socialization. Please take care not to allow children to do any handling without adult supervision, and not until the puppies are at least three weeks of age.

    How Can I Teach a Puppy to Go to the Bathroom?
    During their first few weeks of life, puppies are unable to urinate and defecate on their own. Dog mothers instinctively stimulate their babies to excrete waste through licking. If you are raising puppies without a mother dog, you will have to assume this—luckily, you can use your hands instead of your tongue! Dip a soft washcloth or a piece of gauze in warm water and gently massage the anal and urinary regions after feeding. The warmth, texture and movement mimic a mother dog’s tongue. It is vital that you do this, so have your vet coach you on methods of encouraging newborn puppies to relieve themselves. Puppies begin excreting on their own at about three to four weeks of age.


    Newborn Puppy Care
     
  5. Juicy

    Juicy New Member

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    :) ...
     
  6. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    Good post Juicy !! Though I believe that handling is OK .
     
  7. HoundedByHounds

    HoundedByHounds Oh, it's *you*

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    IMO a school environment of ANY kind is inappropriate for newborn pups. There will be people there who want to hold them and may do so with or without your consent unless they are going to be essentially under your desk at all times.

    They require steady temps...seldom found at most schools I went to..some rooms were cold....others hot. etc...you'd need to keep them in a warming box AT ALL TIMES.

    Schools are full of germs...not just human ones, either. Pet owners attend school and unless you know the status of every student there...someone's dog at home could have parvo or etc and expose the pups. It is IMO very difficult to maintain a acceptable level of sanitation in a school. Orphan pups IN PARTICULAR are extremely extremely vulnerable to outside bugs...they may have not received adequate or ANY colostrum from Mum...and that leaves them naked to the world. Bad thing in a home scenario...I cannot imagine it in a place where literally...hundreds of folks come and go from homes containing other animals, daily.

    Stress. Newborn puppies are not completely unaware of their surroundings...blind and deaf they MAY be...but unfamiliar scents and touches, and sensations...like being carried...can really stress them out.

    I would really consider ALL the above and not see cute needy babies you'd like to tote around with you everywhere you go. But truly helpless vulnerable infants that require CONSTANT monitoring and can go downhill in literally...hours should something go awry.
     
  8. AllieMackie

    AllieMackie Wookie Collie

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    This bothers me, a lot. Why would they give you the pups when you've had no experience caring for puppies? I'm not necessarily saying you shouldn't take them, and you are doing the right thing by asking here. I'm more turning my nose at the rescue you're volunteering for.

    Something should be done in terms of training people to look after newborn pups, or to take on someone who's had experience with it, not just hand you the puppies and wish you luck. :/
     
  9. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    well it was essentially a false alarm, i found someone more suited to deal with their needs and that had raised a litter before (they ended up being MUCH younger then i thought they would be, their eyes were still closed)

    its not a rescue, its a public shelter. eether one of the few volunteers take them or they get PTS. Im going to do some research and try again with a litter than i can handle

    thanks for all your help :)
     
  10. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    It's great that you want to help, and I'm glad you were able to find someone experienced with newborns to take them in :)

    Maybe you can go help the person who does take them.
     
  11. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    Wish you could find a lactating female .
     
  12. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    Sounds like it all worked out for the best.

    I'd suggest doing a bunch of research on puppies and their developmental stages, so that you'd have a better idea of what you're getting into if you do decide to do this in the future. Most puppies don't open their eyes until around three weeks old (correct me if I'm wrong), so it's not likely, I dont' think, that the shelter would really have a lot of babies younger than that who would need a foster home to go to. This does sound like an interesting program, though, and I do think you are one of probably only a handful of volunteers at your shelter who would be responsible enough to really do what's best for the puppies, so I wish you luck if you do decide to do it in the future!
     
  13. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    Im gonna go over and help out with them 2morrow :)
     
  14. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    Ive gotta learn the proper feeding techniques.
     
  15. Ivy

    Ivy New Member

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    At least there are people put there that would like to give the newborns a chance to live a healthy and happy life. Instead of just sitting back and saying "well I don't know how to do that...so I'm just going to sit back and let them put the newborns to sleep"

    Also, the only way to get experience is to actually go out there and do it. There is no other way to learn.

    Things like this cannot be pushed back and forth. If there is nobody else around and something has to be done, than so be it. Don't question things; as by the time your done questioning it it may be too late.

    Also, people come to these forums to get proper advice and support. When or if that advice and direction is given, that is for more valuable than questioning the reason why these newborns are given to somebody wanting to help.
     
  16. HoundMusic

    HoundMusic New Member

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    I COMPLETELY agree with Gina. A school is not the place for a young pup whose immune system is not even developed yet, nor can they even regulate their own body temps. It's very admirable you want to help these pups, but now may not be the best time to volunteer taking in ones so young. Older pups might be a better choice since they are not so limited as to where they can go & are generally less fragile.

    Also, this is a little OT, but I wanted to point this out. There IS a massive difference between Animal RIghts and Animal Welfare, comparing the two is like saying bull baiting and weight pull activities are one in the same. They are on complete opposite ends of the spectrum, with "rights" being literally giving animals rights to be free from human ownership & welfare having to do with the caring/humane treatment of animals.

    Animal Welfare vs. Animal Rights

    PETA Kills Animals | PetaKillsAnimals.com
     
  17. No, this is not the only way to learn. The way to learn about newborn puppies and how to care for them is through a mentor. With a good mentor you can get hands on learning about whelping and raising puppies without having to learn by trial and error.

    [/QUOTE]
     
  18. Dizzy

    Dizzy Sit! Good dog.

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    Well, I think it's a great idea, rather than being PTS.

    I wish people would stop treating dogs like precious little glass ornaments sometimes.... They're tough cookies. Newborn animals are tough. That's why we have 1000's of feral creatures born in foul environments.... Dogs giving birth in sewage pipes and cats breeding in filthy sheds...
     
  19. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    ok ill try to answer everything starting with, i DID NOT take these pups. i misunderstood her fragile they were, I found someone who was more qualified, she has raised MANY litters before so she raised them and i helped as much as i can. i took shifts, did feedings, and just stayed with them while she did errands.. they are irresistably cute and im working on helping her find good homes to line up for them. she is a mentor, and im taking shifts and learning what i can...im not a proffesional but im learning and shes helping me learn. i really DID NOT know how much work it was lol they are cute but very very very needy and LOUD and surprisingly active

    I truly had NO IDEA taking them to school was a problem but i also had NO IDEA how young there were, the pups ended up being TINY (eyes closed). i did not and will not take pups to school. we will keep the room for the older dogs.

    as for the name of the club.. i know. the name is horrible. but i did NOT pick the name.. and by the time i became president. the tshirts had been made and the school thought it would be too much of a "hassle" to change it. it sucks.. i hate it. but the club does some good and i have managed to keep PETA out of the list of "where to donate", fundraisers, ect..

    Yes, the program at the shelter is new and not very good but im glad SOMETHING is being done. Litters of pups used to just come in, and go straight to be put to sleep, atleast now they have a chance. even if its with newbies like me

    Dizzy.. i agree. newborn animals are pretty hardy. i just wanted to learn all I could from the forum from people who have done it before. i didnt mean any harm
     
  20. AGonzalez

    AGonzalez Not a lurker

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    Personally I'd rather see someone who is totally novice take on a litter of abandoned puppies versus the alternative...instant death. At least this way they are being given a chance.

    This isn't someone who's breeding a litter and lost the mother, this is someone who is helping puppies that didn't ask to be born. I would have expected more helpful answers than most gave and less of the typical rude responses. I'm not pointing fingers but the point is at least the shelter is giving them a chance at something more than a needle, and since it sounds like a city/county run shelter they probably don't have the funds to have someone come in and raise puppies, so volunteers is what they have.

    It's better than nothing, why not try to help and support someone trying to do some good in the world.
     

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