Harlequin/Black and White/Merle/Double Merle in Danes???

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by noludoru, Jul 15, 2007.

  1. noludoru

    noludoru Bored Now.

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    17,830
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    1 Dog
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Home Page:
    Someone please explain this to me. I must have it all wrong, but the gist I have gotten from dane sites is that if you breed a Harle (which I thought was black and white spotted, but is apparently merle?) to a black and white dog you will get what they call "merles" but appear to be double merles... I'm really confused.

    Please explain this to me. You cannot get a merle from two non-merle parents.. but that is what I have gotten the impression of. :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:

    Simple terms for nolu's fried brain, please..
     
  2. Beanie

    Beanie Clicker Cult Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 17, 2006
    Messages:
    14,011
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Illinois
    Home Page:
    Harlequins have lots of colours to their genetics, and merle is part of it. Color isn't as simple as they make it in biology, but if we were to make it that simple, think of it as Mm - Merle is dominant (M) to solid (m).
    When you say black & white I think you're referring to the Boston danes - they do not have merle in them, so it's safe to breed a Harle dane to a Boston dane. You'll get Bostons, harle, mismarked whites (I think is what they call them) and merles.

    I don't totally understand the question but I hope this helps.
     
  3. Danegirl2208

    Danegirl2208 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,181
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    If you breed a Harlequin (all harls do carry at least one copy of the merle gene) and a Mantle (which is what i assume you mean by black and white)- you will get Mantles, Harlequins and a few Merles. You can get recessive white dogs which includes piebalds (white with the only color being on the head and tail). But the breeding can not produce a dominant/defective white.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2007
  4. Cheza

    Cheza New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Cheza is piebald harlequin; both her parents were Harles. I -think- that harlequin is actually a 'white merle' in terms of genetics, but I could be wrong on that. Harle to harle is a no-no in terms of breeding because of the high potential to produce whites (blind/deaf) and piebald (typically less prone to blind/deaf, but still not a desired result for obvious reasons).
     

Share This Page