Growling

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by oakash, Oct 7, 2012.

  1. oakash

    oakash Kat/Oak AKA The Nice One

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    So Jack growled at my dad earlier when he was grabbing his collar to pull him away from Suzie. I don't know why he did it, they were playing but I guess he didn't want them to be playing. Anyways, my dad has decided that this is the end of the world, and getting really upset.

    I personally don't care, Jack has growled at me before when I tried to get him off the couch, and I just went and put a leash on him and got him off that way. But yeah, any advice? I was giving him treats while reaching over his head and holding his collar. And I've pulled him towards me and giving him treats
     
  2. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

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    This approach is the correct one, IMO. Just tell your dad that Jack was expressing discomfort with the situation, and since now you know he doesn't like that, you can work on it. Teaching him to move with collar pressure for treats, make a big game out of it.

    Leaving a short leash on him is also a good idea.
     
  3. Danefied

    Danefied New Member

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    Play lots of collar grab games. A LOT of dogs don’t like having their collar grabbed, can’t say I blame them! Counter condition it :)

    Susan Garrett has some collar grab games incorporated in to crate games - my next puppy we’re totally going that route.

    Alternately you can take the dog’s collar off :D
     
  4. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Yes, practice a few times a day, grabbing the collar and associating it with fun and yummy treats. But start out with the very mildest touching of the collar, then holding it, then pulling gently. Over some time...say a couple weeks, advance to grabbing it more roughly or more quickly IF he's okay with it. (not too rough) make it really into a game.

    In addition, I would teach the dog some placement cues. You can make that into a game too. Play the off - on game. Show the dog to get off the couch. Use a leash if you must. Or just encourage him. Then make a fuss over him and give him a bite of something super tasty, like chicken or steak...cheese. Then pat the couch and have him get right back up. No treat for this....just "good." Let him lie there for a minute. Then coax him off. Use your cues as he's doing it. Practice this in different locations on different furniture etc. Teach him to move over on the couch too, from one place to another and on the floor. Make sure you're using your fun, silly, play voice. Attach a verbal cue as he moves and praise/treat. People get in trouble when they think they have to be bossy and stern. That's when dogs get defensive. If you teach the dog that it's a wee of a good time to learn these tricks, the sky is the limit.

    Just remember to work on the collar thing gradually. Use different locations and contexts. And when he's getting onto the game, get other members of your family, especially your Dad to get in on the game too. No bossing, no intimidation, no scary voice....It's a game. Good luck.
     
  5. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    The only other thing I want to add is see if you're dad would be willing to do some work on it too after you have done it. You want her to feel comfortable not just with you but with him too.
     
  6. oakash

    oakash Kat/Oak AKA The Nice One

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    Thanks! I'll definitely work on more collar grabbing games, and I can't believe I didn't think of the Off-On game. I did that with Suzie too. My dad is extremely backwards in his training methods, so I've pretty much been keeping Jack away from him. This is really helpful though guys!
     
  7. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    Yeah Buddy hates his collar/scruff grabbed, so i have been making a game of it, taking a very light hold of it, then releasing right away with a treat, play & praise. i started doing this when i first got him, when we started he wouldnt even let me grip it, now he will tolorate me "taking hold" of it for a few seconds now.
     
  8. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Also, tell your Dad and anybody else never to grab the collar and then punish the dog, even if the punishment is something like taking him to bathe him or clip his nails. The dog learns that grabbing the collar predicts a rotten time and that can induce a bite. Always follow the grab with something good only...make it pleasant and rewarding. That way if you ever do have to grab it to keep him from bolting out the door or keep him from running after something, it won't tend to get him riled up more than he already is from the stimuli that you're trying to prevent him from going after. (or whatever) After lots of practice, he should pair grabbing his collar as a good thing because it predicts fantastic treats and praise. I hope you can explain to your Dad because that old school, compulsive stuff is why dogs get defensive and sometimes bite.
     

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