Crate question

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Taqroy, Apr 30, 2010.

  1. Taqroy

    Taqroy Active Member

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    So we have two of the plastic Petmate crates. One is big and is our perma in the house crate for Mu and the other we had to get because the other wouldn't fit in my car so it's her traveling crate. Now that we are thinking about fostering I am wondering if we can use the extra for the foster dog without Mu guarding it. Is this something I will just have to try or is there something I can do so she doesn't realize it's her crate? We've never had another dog even attempt to go in her crate so I don't know how she'd react to it, I'm just trying to brainstorm solutions for the problems that could come up. Any help is appreciated! Oh and other ideas on stuff we need to worry about with a foster dog would be fantastic! We probably won't be able to start until mid June but I'm really excited.
     
  2. Brattina88

    Brattina88 Active Member

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    We've never had problems with crate guarding - unless a dog is locked IN the crate nomming on a bone, and another dog terrorizes them becuase they want the bone (and that was a particular annoyng foster LOL just being honest). A couple of times they've slept together in a crate. If there's ever an issue we just close them and give them something else to do. We have 3 crates set up right now - and they lay in the dog beds next to the crates lol.

    Kudos to you for thinking about fostering! It can be very fun, and very rewarding! Atthe same time, it sometimes can be challenging and a lot of work ;) In my experience, the group you foster through really makes a difference - try to read up on their policies and such before you commit. I've heard horror stories on the rescue denying vet care (in there case it HAD to be pre-approved NO exceptions.) When the call was made the rescue said no, they'll be fine with some rest, and the delay ulimatly caused the cats death :(

    extra leashes and collars and harnesses are always a bonus ;) Some dogs slip collars easier, you know the drill. Be prepared to crate and rotate if neccissary.

    And don't hesitate to ask questions! :D
     
  3. Taqroy

    Taqroy Active Member

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    Brattina I was hoping you would answer! I know you have lots of experience. :) I've been looking through a lot of rescues' websites trying to get a feel for how they operate. I'm really more concerned with how Mu will act than Murph cause Murph doesn't guard me or his personal space and Mu does both. And she's never had to share her toys before so I don't know how that's going to go. Guess we'll find out. :D
     
  4. Brattina88

    Brattina88 Active Member

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    The couple times we had an issue with resource guarding toys, we just kept EVERYTHING picked up. Balls, bones, etc. They were all on top of the TV stand, lordy what a mess! :p but we got them down when *we* wanted to play with the toys with the dog. Or gave the bone in a crate or on leash only, until the issue was worked out better. It's more management and preventative than problems that way ;)

    And sometimes it's Not the fosters who misbehave... :eek: it's our own! The second or third foster we had, Tucker was still getting used to the idea and we were fosterig females only to make it a bit easier for us. He started getting really possessive of his tennis balls, but it was easy to work through ;) I think working with guarding toys and food is a lot easier to work with than guarding areas; rooms or hallways :eek:

    Also, we had to do Planned out introductions of the dogs. I would have the new foster on leash down the road by the park and my roommates would walk to me, and then we would walk next to eachother to the park and have fun ;) and then walk home together. But after they dogs got used to the idea of fostering it wasn't as big of a deal ;) midnight transports didn't cause chaos and that's always good :rofl1:
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2010
  5. Maura

    Maura New Member

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    Adding a third dog will change the organizational structure of the group. You won't know until it happens. As for the crate, I don't think there will be a problem. You can wash out the smaller crate. When you go to pick up the foster, put an old towel in the crate. This will pick up the new dog's smell and mark the crate as his/hers.
     
  6. ShopieCha

    ShopieCha Training Pro =)

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    It doesn't sound like the dog is too territorial over the crate. If all the dog's use it it should be OK.

    It really just depends on how the dog views it. If the dog has a built up expectation that the crate is ONLY for them then you might run into trouble.

    Try to see if you can set the mindset that it is for everyone and you should be OK
     

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