Breeders, is age of buyer a serious concern?

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by Kirsten&Gypsy, Jan 28, 2013.

  1. Kirsten&Gypsy

    Kirsten&Gypsy New Member

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    Hi all! New here, though not to dog ownership - I finally get to say that after raising Gyp from pup to age three, woot! - or dog forums.

    I will be, in the next year or so, very seriously investigating breeders in the hopes of acquiring a puppy or young adult of a rare breed from a closeknit breed community. I have nothing but the very best intentions for this dog, of course, and would only add to the gang when I'm financially, emotionally, and in all other ways prepared. I'm the type of person to plan ahead and out, often in excess. As it is, I've been researching this particular breed since I got Gypsy.

    However, I am only 22 years old. As a breeder, would my age be a concern for you? On the flipside, as a buyer, was your age a concern for your breeder? A barrier to purchasing a puppy? What kinds of things could I do to reassure the breeder, if possible?

    I'm meeting a breeder this weekend. Not to purchase, or even plan to purchase, but to meet some fine examples of the breed. As much research as I've done, I've never met any of these dogs. But this is about to change! Anyway, I'm a little nervous that I won't be taken seriously. Or that my age will come as a surprise or disappointment.
     
  2. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    I'm not a breeder, but I do approve adoptions and have adopted out my fosters, and I'll say this:

    Yes, age is a concern, but personally I wouldn't eliminate someone because of their age. Some rescues do say things like "no one under 25", etc...which I think is silly, because plenty of 40 year olds are completely unfit to have a dog, and plenty of 20 year olds are very responsible...although obviously at a younger age you're going to have less stability.

    At 22, many people have graduated college, have stable dogs, are renting a long-term place, living with a SO, etc. It's not like adopting or selling a dog to an 18 or 19 year old.

    My questions for someone that age are things like "how long do you plan on staying at your current job?" "when do you plan on moving next?" "if you need to move back in with your parents, will they allow you to take the dog with you?" etc. I'd be a little wary to adopt to someone who just moved, started a new job after graduation, recently moved in with an SO, etc.
     
  3. Linds

    Linds Twin 2

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    I think that once you meet the breeder and show them how serious and knowledgable you are it'll be hard to not take you seriously. I imagine that the breeder you're meeting wants the best homes for their dogs and can see past age pretty easily. At least, I would hope so.

    What I'm saying is age really has never been an issue with me. People in the dog would that I tend to interact with from trainers, to vets, to breeders, to random people at the dog park or store pretty seem to not value age so much as knowledge and dedication. And I hope and would bet this breeder isn't going to be the exception to this.

    Good luck and I hope the first meeting with this mystery breed is everything you dreamed of!
     
  4. Shai

    Shai & the Muttly Crew

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    Good references and presenting yourself well should go a long way to overcoming any possible age-related reservations.
     
  5. Lyzelle

    Lyzelle New Member

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    Yeah, a LOT of breeders and rescues declined me and my husband due to age (20 and 22) and occupation (military). We were blown off, never taken seriously, and many were downright rude. Many never responded at all. It was even worse last year, when I was 19. And we were plenty stable financially, with a ton of plans in place. No one wanted to hear it.

    And in all honestly, there is nothing that you can, or should, do in order to "reassure" these people. They've already judged you by age alone. That isn't the sort of breeder or rescue you want. Dump them.

    My current breeder is perfectly okay with our ages, and never seemed to give a thought to our military lifestyle, aside from a move vs litter available issue.
     
  6. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    I got both mia and summer in college. I was...20? Or so when I got Summer. My math is stinking. I've had Mia approx 3 and some odd years... I think I was 22 when I got Mia and 20 when I got Summer. It was fine. Summer though, I had known her breeder for years prior to getting her and my family had already had several dogs from her. Mia was from a breeder I'd never met but I had Summer already and was able to tell her what I'd done with Summer and what experience I'd had with the breed.

    As long as you can prove you're serious and can answer questions about your plans for the future, I don't think it's much of a problem. Of course by the time I'd gotten Mia, she was the 7th papillon I'd lived with so....

    I think it does help to have a dog resume, so to speak. Good references from vets, breeders, trainers, etc.
     
  7. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    Age, part time vs full time, student vs not, and permanent residence vs moving around have NOT affected me in the dog department. I got Logan when I was 22, from a good breeder. I'm not even certain she asked how old I was. She did make sure she got to meet me before she turned Logan over to my care, but that's to be expected. I went and stayed at her place for a couple nights. I really, REALLY didn't want to go home after that lol. I'm still dying to get back up there permanently. It keep getting delayed more and more :( SOME DAY, THOUGH!
     
  8. JessLough

    JessLough Love My Mutt

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    This. Especially bolded.

    I've contacted a few breeders, am 22 currently though contact was made when I was 20/21 and never had an issue with it. Now, I haven't gotten any of the puppies, but they all told me they'd have no issue with selling me a pup. (and that was with some concerns I had that some breeders have issues with -- keeping pup intact until at least 3 if not for life, hunting breeds living with ferrets, etc)
     
  9. Flyinsbt

    Flyinsbt New Member

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    As a breeder, it wouldn't be a concern to me, if you were mature and reasonably settled (not expecting you to necessarily to never move or change careers, but to be unlikely to suddenly decide to spend the next year hitchhiking across Europe). That would actually be true of a person who was somewhat older than you, too. My primary concern would be if the person is ready to commit to the 15-ish year relationship that a dog entails.
     
  10. Equinox

    Equinox Active Member

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    I was 15 years old when I bought my dog (German Shepherd) from a working/sport breeder who had been breeding for 30+ years. I did the research, contacted the breeders, spoke to him through phone and e-mail and discussed what I was looking for. I told him in the conversation that I was only 15, and he asked if my parents were on board. I said yes, and we continued to talk about his dogs. My parents had no involvement other than writing the check (my money from work in their account).

    I'm extremely grateful that my age was not an issue for this breeder, and that he's always remained friendly and helpful. I still e-mail him occasionally with updates and always get a reply back!

    That was over 4 years ago, my dog is 3 1/2 years old now and I'm 19. I've been in contact with several breeders on and off, and have not had any issues with their attitude regarding my age. I won't have another dog until I'm 22 or 23, so I will be actively looking once I am right around your age. I plan to simply do what I have been doing - talk to them about my dog and show them I do have experience owning the breed and a working bred dog, tell them what I am looking for and what about their dogs or kennel that caught my eye, etc. I tend to talk a lot about the breed itself and how a particular breeding or their program appeals to me in terms of what I find ideal. I think that gives the breeder a clue that I do know a little about the breed and understand them enough to own and commit to one (in my case, again).


    ... weren't you a math major while you were in college? :D :p
     
  11. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    Many moons ago. :p
     
  12. Toller_08

    Toller_08 Active Member

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    Age did seem to be an issue for some of the breeders I talked to before I got Dance (my toller). I was 17 and breeders were rightfully concerned about my future, job and education wise, and how a dog would fit in. I am sure I could have relaxed those concerns, but I was shy and didn't really know how and just moved on feeling defeated like I was turned down for my age, regardless of the fact that dogs are and always have been my world. Now, at 22, I bought my second dog of my own and age did come up, but it wasn't the deciding factor. Journey's breeder asked me about future plans because I am young, and obviously she was comfortable with my answer because I picked up my puppy shortly after. :)

    So be prepared for age and life plans to be questioned, as I think a breeder has a right to be concerned initially about a person's age, but your age should definitely not be the deciding factor. Your answer as to how another dog fits into your goals/plans will likely be more important. And some breeders don't seem to question age at all.
     
  13. Southpaw

    Southpaw orange iguanas.

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    Age has never been a concern when I've contacted breeders, nor was it a concern when I went through rescue to adopt Happy. All they were concerned about was that I still live with my parents - were they okay with me bringing a dog in, would I take this dog with me when I move out, etc.

    I think if you present yourself seriously and come across as the right fit, then it won't matter how old you are.
     
  14. frostfell

    frostfell Kung Pow Fish

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    Id never sell a dog to someone under 18 simply because a minor cannot legally own property or enter into a contract.

    Over 18, normal screening processes apply. A particular age group doesnt get automatic approval or disapproval. Morons, on the other hand :rofl1:
     
  15. Red Chrome

    Red Chrome New Member

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    This.^

    For me it is a case by case basis. I would sell to a junior handler as long as the parents were willing to sign the contracts and paperwork etc. So, the parents would have to follow the contract or make sure that the JH did.
     
  16. Tazwell

    Tazwell New Member

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    I was 20 when I traveled halfway across the country to a reputable breeder to purchase Fleetwood. My age never seemed to be an issue. I've adopted out to plenty of young couples or individuals in rescue, but always taking all the variables into consideration. I was pretty lenient because I was too, very young.
     
  17. Equinox

    Equinox Active Member

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    Chazzers are turning out to be a lot younger than I had guessed.

    I'm a reluctant math major right now. SAD LIFE. Math is gross.
     
  18. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    On the plus side I never use my degree nowadays.

    Or maybe that's more depressing than happy.
     
  19. Equinox

    Equinox Active Member

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    :rofl1: It's okay, you don't have to do math. No math trumps everything else.
     
  20. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    It was the main reason for being turned down by rescue. Breeders were a lot more willing to look past my age on paper and into my actual situation. At that point it was fine.
     

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