Bikejoring?

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Red.Apricot, May 25, 2012.

  1. Red.Apricot

    Red.Apricot Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Southern California
    Bikejoring looks like a really fun activity, and I was wondering if anyone has any links/information on it.

    Specifically, I'm wondering what are the requirements? What kind of equipment would I need?

    I basically know nothing except that the dog pulls the bike.
     
  2. ~Tucker&Me~

    ~Tucker&Me~ and Spy.

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    4,940
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 Dog, 1 cat, 2 lovebirds, fish galore
    Location:
    B.C.
    I am also interested in trying this. From what I can find on Alpine Outfitters (http://www.alpineoutfitters.net/secure/scripts/default.asp), you need a harness and a scooter line... And of course a bike :p I found one article on how to train it but there was mention of dominance theory and I don't really trust it, so I will probably just try and figure it out on my own lol. I am considering ordering the scooter line and the x-back harness and giving it a try this summer.
     
  3. Red.Apricot

    Red.Apricot Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Southern California
    The main thing I'm worried about right now is hurting Elsie somehow. When we bike now, if she doesn't think we're going fast enough, she'll pull me some. She only weighs 38lbs, though, and I can't find anything assuring me that's okay.

    I've found plans online for how to make your own harness and scooter line, so I might try that.

    I also haven't found much on how to train it. The idea doesn't seem all that complicated from the outside, though... but that's the way it always is, right?
     
  4. ~Tucker&Me~

    ~Tucker&Me~ and Spy.

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    4,940
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 Dog, 1 cat, 2 lovebirds, fish galore
    Location:
    B.C.
    Can you post the link to those plans? :D The nice thing about the bike is that you can help her out by pedalling so she doesn't have to pull all your weight. With Spy, who is ~45, I would probably pedal myself up the hills so he isn't working too hard and would gently pedal on flat surfaces.

    So true. It does seem simplish so I am just hoping I am not in for a nasty surprise :p
     
  5. sassafras

    sassafras mushinois

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Messages:
    6,405
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I highly recommend a book called Ski Spot Run. It is mostly about skijoring, but the basics of training the verbal commands are the same regardless of what pulling/mushing sport you play and there are great tips for training the commands starting just on walks.
     
  6. Red.Apricot

    Red.Apricot Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Southern California
    Harness!

    I can't find the link right now for the place that had the home-made line, but they used bungee cords. I thought I'd saved it, but now it's not there. Grr...
     
  7. Red.Apricot

    Red.Apricot Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Southern California
    I will definitely add that to my stack of books to read, thank you!

    Do you think a 38lb dog would be okay doing this?
     
  8. sassafras

    sassafras mushinois

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Messages:
    6,405
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I think a 38 pound dog would be fine. You will be contributing a lot to the workload with the bike, it's not like pulling a sled... it's more like skijoring. I mean, they are working, but it's not all on them.
     
  9. Red.Apricot

    Red.Apricot Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Southern California
    That makes me feel a lot better. We went for a ride this morning, and she was really trying to get ahead of me and pull. She doesn't think trotting is an appropriate pace.
     
  10. crazedACD

    crazedACD Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Too Many
    Location:
    West Missouri
    I didn't officially try it out, but I put a regular walking harness on Skye one afternoon and figured I'd see if I can at least get her to hold the line out tight. No no no...not as quick to teach that as I thought it would be! It definitely requires some prep work and training :p.

    There's a gal out here that does bikejor/skijor lessons...but they are really expensive. I'm talking like $150 a session.
     
  11. Snark

    Snark Mutts to you

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2006
    Messages:
    4,023
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    3 dogs, 9 housecats, 2 horses
    Location:
    Midwest
    I would look for an urban trail harness - it's made for attaching a little higher (as to a scooter/bike) than an x-back harness. Check out dogscooter.com - they have training tips for teaching scootering which would probably translate pretty easily to bicycles, as well as links for equipment.
     
  12. sassafras

    sassafras mushinois

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Messages:
    6,405
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Alpine Outfitters has a nice urban trails harness, and you can get an adjustable one if you are feeling insecure about measuring properly.
     

Share This Page