BCs easier than Aussies?

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by Sekah, Jan 7, 2013.

  1. Sekah

    Sekah The Monster.

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    I was speaking with a sport BC breeder this weekend and after I mentioned a) I had an Aussie and b) I was concerned with potential reactivity issues in a potential future BC puppy she mentioned that she has found that BCs are much easier than Aussies (I think she'd had an Aussie and her wording was something like, "never again...").

    I could see how much Aussie is quite a handful, but I sort of imagined a future BC pup to be just like her and MORE. Granted this is just one person's opinion thus far, but I'm wondering if generally the breed is a bit more difficult to manage than BCs.

    What are other people's thoughts and experiences?

    I suppose it depends on what makes a dog difficult in your eyes. Energy levels? Reactivity? (Non)-Biddability?
     
  2. Linds

    Linds Twin 2

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    I don't really have anything to say to the comparison but just it could very well just be she didn't mesh with an Aussie so everything seemed harder. More of a right fit a dog is for you less hard it is it seems. I mean, I find Traveler and Didgie pretty easily but my parents dog frustrating. Believe me, they don't feel the same way.
     
  3. AllieMackie

    AllieMackie Wookie Collie

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    I was going to say something similar. I think a lot of it depends on how you mesh with your dog.
     
  4. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    IME with both breeds I found Aussies to be more difficult, neither had more or less energy but their drives and biddability differed in a sense that made border collies a better fit for me.
     
  5. Flyinsbt

    Flyinsbt New Member

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    It probably does depend somewhat on how you mesh with the breed. My experience, as someone who is not interested in owning either breed, is that there is definitely more of a tendency to be reactive in BCs than in Aussies. So if that's what you define as difficult, BCs are more difficult. But not all BCs are reactive, so then it comes down to the individual dog. There's a really wide variance in temperament in BCs, so it's hard to generalize about the breed.
     
  6. xpaeanx

    xpaeanx Active Member

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    I think that was probably a wrong dog, wrong person. Once you get used to how a certain breed tends to operate you get used that and switching is hard.

    From my observations as an outsider, BC tend to be more "intense" than Aussies. So for most people that makes Aussies easier. When you are used to training an "intense" dog you are likely to get frustrated when the communication isn't what you are used too.

    However, I have never personally owned either breed so I can't give a "from experience" opinion, but just a "from observation" one.
     
  7. Beanie

    Beanie Clicker Cult Coordinator

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    I agree that it's probably a difference in person and type of dog. I like Aussies plenty but I mesh far far better with BCs, definitely. I wouldn't say Aussies are more difficult necessarily, but I can see where the personality differences might cause that problem.
     
  8. SaraB

    SaraB New Member

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    This. I had a hard time with danes mostly because they just didn't quite fit me. Went back to herders and I think they are the easiest things in the world.
     
  9. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

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    I love me an Aussie, but sometimes I really appreciate the seriousness of a Border Collie who's working and focused.

    It really depends on the dog, the person and how well they work together though.
     
  10. OwnedByBCs

    OwnedByBCs Will Creep For Sheep

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    Did that person's name happen to be Kim? LOL. I know this lady who breeds sport BCs and her husband had a horrible Aussie who pretty much gave her non stop hell. I just thought it might be her because she also lives in Canada.

    Anyways, it depends on the dog! I've met some Aussies that were insane, and I've met a lot of Border Collies who were insane. The thing is, like with most things when buying a dog from a breeder- the lines matter! If you want a dog who is calmer and less reactive, just look for that in a breeder. Meet their dogs, outside of the home (at a show or agility trial) and see how they deal with high stress situations. Most sport breeders tend not to breed highly reactive dogs, because their main focus is agility and flyball- high stress environments where reactivity would really hinder their abilities.
     
  11. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    It's hard to tell.. I mean in general, both are high energy herding breeds and by many descriptions would fit the "not easy" category.
    but in the generallist of general traits.. I'd say that there are a few differences/preferences that make people think that BCs are easier for THEM (albeit not easier in general) I did some research when I was choosing between breeds and heres what made me pick aussies and spoke to a lot of owners and here is kind of what I gathered..

    - Seriousness towards work. I think it was said at some point on this forum "Aussies think everything is a joke, border collies think nothing is a joke" of course both have moments of seriousness/playfulness but in GENERAL, I have found that aussies "natural setting" is fun/comedians, and border collies "natural setting" is more serious. Both are serious when working, but border collies just seem to think they are working a lot more often lol

    I find it much easier to work with Merlin in all his happy silliness :) to me, training is a game so his temperament suits me :) but to others, a more serious demeanor might be easier.

    - Natural movement. Border collies stalk, aussies bounce. I love how bouncy Merlin in, he is like a little bunny rabbit! I see how it would drive some people nuts.

    - Handler forgiveness. Border collies tend to point out handler mistakes lol "THE WORD FOR JUMP ON THE TABLE IS OVER NOT ON! DO NOT MAKE THAT MISTAKE AGAIN!!" and Aussies tend to be more forgiving of fumbling handlers lol probably because yea.. most of the time, it's a big game

    - How they deal with handler stress. Border collies tend to mirror anxiety/sadness/stress, they bond in a very close way and feel the same way their handlers do. Aussies tend to try to cheer you up and make you laugh.

    - Tails. Aussies typically don't have them so they can't knock over things on coffee tables. Border collies have tails but it's easier to tell their feelings by how they carry them.
    Depends on what you think is "easy" lol

    - Aloofness towards strangers. Both breeds are considered aloof.. but from what I've gathered.. aussies stray on the side of more friendly. Give them a minute and they will give you a butt wiggle, say hello and then go right back to their person. Border collies will just blow you off all together until they trust you..and even then lol

    -Affection. Border collies tend to be more mannerly in their affections. They show love by working with you, being around you, cuddles. It's a quiet affair at times.
    Aussies cuddle, butt wiggle, body slam, hop, bounce, bark.. OMG HI I LOVE YOU SO MUCH!!! HIII!!! HIIII!!!
    I've seen how border collies play at the park vs. aussie and there are some OBVIOUS differences. Lots of body slamming on the aussie hand of things lol

    I like affection that comes with wiggles and body slams and weird noises.
    Some people find that..difficult.


    So yea, it's not that one is 'easier' IMO.. just depends on what you think is easy.
     
  12. JacksonsMom

    JacksonsMom Active Member

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    Thank you so much for this great post!

    I'm fairly certain I'm already set on a breed for my next dog, but always want to try a herding breed, and it was a lot of BCs vs Aussies vs ESs and I think this just determines for me that an Aussie wouldn't be a good fit for Jackson and myself. The bouncy, happy, goofy part would drive Jackson bananas, I'm sure, lol. He meshes very well with our agility trainers BC's which makes me think he'd live nicely with one and get along great.
     
  13. Toller_08

    Toller_08 Active Member

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    Yeah, I tend to agree with others who have said it was likely just that an Aussie (or her Aussie) wasn't quite as good of a fit for her as Border Collies are, and thus an Aussie is more difficult for her.

    I did a lot of research on both breeds over the years, trying to decide which would be a better fit for me or if either would even be a good fit at all. I came to the conclusion that as much as I love Border Collies, I don't think they'd be the ideal fit for me. Mostly because they're so serious and tend to pick up on handler emotion and errors way too easily and take it to heart, among a few other things. I had a Border Collie mix prior, who acted way more Border Collie than the other half of her mix, and I've gotta say, for as much as I adored her and she'll always hold a special place in my heart, my Aussie suits me better so far. I love my Aussie's bounce and sass and need to abundantly show her enthusiasm about everything always without worrying about looking like a dork haha. I like how even though she's very biddable, she also has a slightly head strong streak. Some of these traits would make her annoying or difficult to other people, but I love them.

    I think it just comes down to what one person finds difficult and what another doesn't. Both breeds can have reactive specimens. I've seen it numerous times in both. Both breeds can be dog selective it seems. Both breeds can be aloof with strangers, just as both breeds can be very friendly. I don't think you can easily pinpoint any one single thing that might make one of these breeds more difficult than the other. More than anything it really is just going to come down to what bothers an individual person. I know a few people now who own both breeds and love both, and don't find one any more difficult than the other. They were Border Collie people first and got an Aussie to tone down the seriousness a little bit they said.

    ETA: I currently live with a breed that I love but have come to the conclusion that they aren't the best match for me. Thus, I think they're kind of difficult in a lot of ways and find Dance and Journey much easier to live with, eventhough in reality they actually require more than the Dobermans do. But the people who Dobermans do suit would totally disagree I'm sure. My Doberman breeder, for one, does not enjoy my fuzzy girls at all haha. So yeah, a lot of it is very individual.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2013
  14. Dizzy

    Dizzy Sit! Good dog.

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    So much Aussie want.

    That is all.
     
  15. Flyinsbt

    Flyinsbt New Member

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    Now maybe it's regional, but that's not what I see at all. Aussies that I've been around tend to be aloof with strangers. I know a few that might be willing to meet new people, but generally, not so much. This is both working and show line Aussies. BCs, OTOH, tend to be all over the map. I know many super friendly, in-your-face BCs. And many aloof BCs. And some reactive BCs, who it's best not to look at too closely. I know some BCs who bond closely with their owners, and some who don't. They just aren't a real consistent breed.
     
  16. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    I think it depends on the dog. I know Aussies that are goofy and silly and then aussies that are pretty serious dogs. I know BCs that are much the same. There is such a huge variety across both breeds that it's hard to really pinpoint. The first aussies I really spent time around were not really my style but the ones I've been around recently very much are my style.

    The aussies I've been around recently are working type dogs. They're really nice dogs, imo. Happy and 'up' but with a serious streak when needed. Biddable and easy to work with but they do have a little bit of hard headedness.

    BCs are either my favorite kind of dog or they seem to be nuts. I've met a lot more BCs with serious issues than aussies. OCD, dog aggression, reactivity, that kind of thing.

    The first aussies I've met were bulldozers. I'm sure its a combination of lines and training.

    My family insists Mia is impossible. She's super easy to me. I have so many people act like shelties are a hard breed to own and they're super super easy to me.
     
  17. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    Fran, wait until Merlin grows up a bit. He should become a bit more reserved; still friendly but not body slamming strangers. Sawyer's way to greet me is to pogo-stick up to eye level. To greet strangers, he pretty much ignores them for a while, or, if he thinks they're neat, he'll go lean against their legs.
     
  18. StillandSilent

    StillandSilent New Member

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    Having worked with both and owned neither (though Gambit is about half BC), I have to say I would consider a BC a million times easier then an aussie. I mesh better with a more serious, dignified dog, and the BC's I meet tend to be more like that then the aussies.

    It's really what you can live with, though. I consider Gambit to be far and away the easiest dog I have ever lived with. He's quiet, biddable, nondestructive, tolerant of other animals, athletic, and very healthy. He just hates strangers with a passion. Most of the people in my life can not fathom how I could live with him for even a day.
     
  19. ~Tucker&Me~

    ~Tucker&Me~ and Spy.

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    I think this is right on the money. As others have mentioned, it is very difficult to say with certainty that border collies are more THIS while aussies are more THAT (besides working style) because the breeds and lines within the breeds vary so much. While I believe there is less variation in aussies than in BCs, it's still really dependant on which breeder the dog is coming from and what type of temperaments her breeding stock has been throwing.
     
  20. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    Yeah IME Aussies are more likely to be guardy/protective than BCs, although certainly not all are.

    I guess I might have asked why she felt Aussies were difficult but TBH, I have learned to take other people's experiences with breeds with a grain of salt. I have been told all kinds of strange things about PyrSheps and if I had listened to a lot of people, I would have never gotten one because I'd have become convinced they're either "too hyper" and/or "too fearful" to do anything with. Also "they're ok for training can't be trialed". Whatever. I liked them, got one and he's an awesome dog. I never researched Belgians before getting one but the things I hear about them aren't necessarily true to my experience "they're all unstable", "the black ones don't have any drive", "they stress to easily for competition", "they're all reactive biters", "working line Mals can never, ever be anything like a pet". Again...whatever :)

    I'm not saying you shouldn't research breeds and there are things you absolutely should heed when told. I should have listened when I was repeatedly told "GSDs have SSA" for example. Good breeders can tell you a lot about their dogs, both their breed an specific lines. But things like how good or bad a breed is,how easy or hard they are...those are all really subjective and vary from person to person depending on their personal experience.

    I will say though, if you mainly want a dog who is like your Aussie but "more"...have you looked into the serious working line Aussies?
     

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