Would you buy from a breeder who uses kennels?

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by Paviche, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. Paviche

    Paviche Duuuuude.

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Messages:
    1,297
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Aurora, CO
    I'm just curious. A while back I visited an Aussie breeder that was producing the sort of dogs I liked at the time. I found her to be helpful and knowledgable and her dogs were happy, well-socialized and well taken care of. She also ran a boarding facility in which her own dogs stayed. These dogs weren't languishing in kennels; they were taken out and worked with every day. The breeder lived on a large plot of land that her dogs got to take advantage of. The kennels were right across the driveway from her house. In theory I don't see this as being unethical, but I found I just couldn't let go of the fact the dogs weren't strictly house dogs (although they got access to the house during the day, too.)

    I think the biggest issue for me was that they had two litters on the ground and the pups were living in the kennel, too. As I said, their adults all seemed very well-socialized so I'm sure they were putting in all the necessary work with the pups to give them a good start, but... well, I guess I'd rather see pups raised "underfoot". I'd want to bring a pup home to a new but familiar environment. I would guess that the pups got house time just like the adults, although it's been long enough now that I can't remember.

    So my question is, would you be comfortable buying from a breeder whose dogs aren't all kept in the house? Would certain variables effect your decision (ie, it might be okay for some breeds but not ideal for companion breeds?) I'm curious to see what y'all think.

    edit: Ack, meant to post this in the Breeding Ground, sorry!
     
  2. sillysally

    sillysally Obey the Toad.

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2008
    Messages:
    5,074
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 dogs, 2 cats, 2 birds, and 1 horse
    Location:
    A hole in the bottom of the sea.
    If I were looking at a lab breeder I would definitely prefer one that had the dogs in the house. I want my pup to be well socialized with all the goings on of a household when I bring him home.
     
  3. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    15,349
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Hmmm... I think if the breeder was 110% perfect in every other way, it wouldn't be a deal breaker...but it might also depend on what I wanted the dog for.

    Years ago, most dogs lived outside. Just like today, some were probably neglected, undersocialized, understimulated, and some were probably perfectly well adapted and cared for properly. Today...it's not considered the norm to have dogs live in kennels, but I don't see a huge problem with it. I want my dogs to be part of the family, and not just a working partner....I want them lying under the table at dinnertime, and snuggling on the couch while we watch tv, etc...but I don't think there's anything wrong with keeping a dog in a kennel, and I'd consider getting a dog from someone who did.
     
  4. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    8,893
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 Pit bulls and 2 Malinois, We like to stay busy.
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Home Page:
    Backup came from a breeder who raised dogs in outside kennel runs. The breeder laughed at me when I said I would make him a house pet and well.. she should still be laughing.

    He came to me without any knowledge or respect of home living at 8 months old and that is a rough thing to train at that age.

    I would do it again though, she still knew her dogs inside and out which is what I wanted. Plus she tested, trained, and proved her dogs prior to breeding and put foundation on all puppies.
     
  5. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Messages:
    9,419
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2
    Location:
    Georgia
    Knox and Apollo both came from a breeder who raises dogs in a kennel. Apollo was purchased at 4 months old, and was the best dog I've ever had the pleasure of working with. Knox I got at a year and a half, and he's got his own issues, but she knew exactly what I wanted in a dog and he's **** close right now.

    She puts a foundation on all of her dogs and they're all extremely well socialized with people and other dogs. His head is full of fluff, but that's just his personality :p
     
  6. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    8,893
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 Pit bulls and 2 Malinois, We like to stay busy.
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Home Page:
    <---- knows full of fluff heads... Something about them is so damned irresistible. lol
     
  7. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Messages:
    9,419
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2
    Location:
    Georgia
    Yeah, he's definitely a charmer, but his head is nothing but fluff :p
     
  8. Lizmo

    Lizmo Water Junkie

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    17,300
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2
    Location:
    AL
    Oh, definitely! Actually, already have. :) And would do it again in a heart beat.
     
  9. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    19,779
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    8 dogs and 6 horses.
    Location:
    Ontario
    Home Page:
    Sure. Its not like a puppy raised in a kennel is going to be hugely different than one raised in a kitchen if the owners are socializing them.

    Getting an older dog is different. Seren spent most of her life in a kennel (the keep dogs in kennels but raise puppies in their house). The time spent in the house almost 2 years ago didn't seem to make an impression lol. Its been a tricky go of it with her with somethings. Still if I really liked the dog and breeder I wouldn't hesitate.

    That said almost every JRT breeder I like uses kennels, even if they rotate the dogs through the house as JRTs can be nasty lol.
     
  10. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    Messages:
    3,072
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    none
    Location:
    UT
    i'll go you one better (or worse depending), the dogo breeder i will eventually import from only keeps the "house" dogs in kennels. the dogos at the estancia are kept on chains when not hunting.
     
  11. Moth

    Moth Mild and Slightly Nutty

    Joined:
    May 9, 2011
    Messages:
    5,037
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    3
    Location:
    Madison, WI
    Watson's breeder had her house built so the first floor consists of indoor/outdoor runs for the dogs. Her yard is sectioned into 3 separate fenced areas... She rotates her dogs because basenji's can be snarky little buggers and not all of them get along ;)

    That being said all her dogs also get their turn hanging out in the upstairs people part of the house and get their turn sleeping in the bed :)

    Watson came to us well socialized at the age of 4 months and he was fine with house living.
     
  12. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3,452
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    6 + finches
    Location:
    Upper Left hand corner, USA
    Depends on the breed but generally yes - I'd buy from a breeder with a kennel. Kennels aren't a deal breaker, or even a bad thing - I have kennels too - my dogs just aren't in them most of the day (or at all some days.)

    That said at times something is lost with a kennel dog depending on the breed. A house dog breeder who has 3 dogs in the house and 30 in a kennel outside can't possibly know if they're breeding a quality house dog. 3 generations down from that they may be breeding a pretty dog but a better to exceptional housedog? Maybe not so much. That which is not selected for is lost
     
  13. MicksMom

    MicksMom Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    3,978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    1 furry
    Location:
    Warren Co, NJ
    That's similar to the set up Caleb's breeder had, although she'd bring her dogs inside, and her pups were raised in the house. Her kennels were just outside her back door. Besides boarding, she also took dogs in for field training.
     
  14. Linds

    Linds Twin 2

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    7,099
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Illinois
    This. It doesn't even phase me, not really something that I thought about.
     
  15. PWCorgi

    PWCorgi Priscilla Winifred Corgi

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    14,854
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    1
    Location:
    Twin Citay!
    Depends on how the situation is handled. If the dogs only ever see people to get fed, then no, not gonna work. If they get out to run, train, get loved on every day, then I'd be much more open to the idea.

    I'd rather see dogs kenneled and well taken care of then stuck in crates inside the house all day.
     
  16. elegy

    elegy overdogged

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2006
    Messages:
    7,720
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Home Page:
    Probably not if that is their primary living space.
     
  17. Lizmo

    Lizmo Water Junkie

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    17,300
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2
    Location:
    AL
    To me, these are two separate problems. If the dogs aren't getting exercised and trained with human contact chances are the dogs also aren't proving themselves to be worthy for breeding. And chances are, kennels have nothing to do with whether or not the breeder is like this.

    For me, kennels have no barring on good care or not. If they aren't getting trained/exercised/proven, then it's a breeder problem, not a kennel problem.
     
  18. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    3,415
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    fiver
    Location:
    B-ville
    Home Page:
    Nope.

    We see too many kennel dogs at work. I always feel horrible for them.
     
  19. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    2,115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    1 dog, 1 guinea pig, 1 hamster, 1 American toad, 1
    Location:
    Illinois
    In a heartbeat - kennels or chain spots, either are just fine by me.
     
  20. Linds

    Linds Twin 2

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    7,099
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Illinois
    YES

    To be honest, I loved how comfortable Traveler was outside and I do attribute that to growing up outside.

    The way I look at it, Traveler never left the ranch he was on. I doubt he was inside more than once or twice and he was able fly across the world, go through four airports over three days and it never phased him. A stable dog is a stable dog and a kennel isn't going to make or break that. He is still as bomb proof as can be, never was afraid of vacuums, fireworks, odd flooring, storms etc.

    I figure, if the dogs are coming out of it good and are what I want then whether or not they are kenneled doesn't matter, the fact that they are good dogs does.
     

Share This Page