Would you buy a 'trained' dog?

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by crazedACD, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. crazedACD

    crazedACD Active Member

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    I don't think I've ever thought too much about this, but an ad got me wondering.

    Obviously there's a market for puppies, a market for the mysterious shelter dogs, a market for rehomes or aged breeder dogs, a market for even trained protection dogs.

    Next new thing...professionally trained companion dogs? The kennel in question is selling two purebred dogs (lab and a boxer) for $7500 and $6500, "fully trained in on/off leash obedience".

    I do think it's kind of a good idea for people that have had trouble starting dogs or have specific requirements, but I think the cost is a little silly. I'm not sure someone that has trouble training their dogs will even be able to keep those dogs behaving..I really think a lot of training troubles is more the owner than the dog.

    Oh..and you can buy one of their personal protection dogs for $65,000 if you wish.. :yikes:
     
  2. RBark

    RBark Got Floof?

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    I definitely would not mind this. In fact, I've spoken (a bit, and months ago) with a friend whom I may get a pup from about going this route in part due to my living situation not lending itself to the puppy training that would be required.

    And even with my last puppy, Priscilla, I did look for an older dog that was pre-trained. The convinence is compelling when one works as much as I do.
     
  3. yoko

    yoko New Member

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    I could see why someone would want that but I really like working with my dogs. I always thought of that as part of the whole bonding thing.

    But I could easily undercut their price... Hmmmm.
     
  4. thehoundgirl

    thehoundgirl Active Member

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    For that much? No way. I prefer training my own dogs. I could see it working for someone who isn't very dog savvy or whatever, but I wouldn't pay that much for a dog of my own. Training your dog or puppy no matter where the dog came from helps you bond more. So yeah, I don't think I would personally pay that much for a "fully trained dog" when I can train the dog or puppy myself.
     
  5. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    No. For one I feel like they've probably been trained by methods I would not agree with. I don't know why, just the vibe I get from those sort of things. That's probably the biggest reason I wouldn't do it, I'd be worried about the dog having been trained with physical punishments and thus having a dog who listens to me out of fear.
    Secondly, I think changing owners will make a big difference in the dog's behavior. Many dogs will only listen to those who have trained them, not random people. The new owner would still have to train the dog. Also, if the dog's ARE trained with punishment you'd likely have to make them equally afraid of you in order for them to listen.

    I also happen to enjoy training my dog and think it is a huge part in building the bond between dog and human.


    ETA: I'm not talking about "pre owned" dogs that are simply being rehomed and happen to have been trained while in their home. I'm more refering to kennels or training facilities that seem to buy dogs just to train and sell. I'm also not referring to manners, I'm referring to commands. Manners I could see working better.
     
  6. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    Would I buy one if I was at the point in my life that I wanted an adult trained well bred dog and didn't have time for puppy madness? Sure, I think it's a great idea. As long as there was AMPUL proof of these dogs (videos etc.) being well trained (sit, down, stay, come, off leash, off the sofa, crate training), great around children, people,other dogs, other pets etc.. and great out and about.. I think it's a splendid idea. If they were CGC certified and such, even better!

    Would I pay THAT MUCH? No. Professionally protection trained dogs.. I get the high prices. That's a lot of work, man hours, liability.. pet dogs that could pass a cgc and have basic training any beginner trainer could do with some time and patience.. no way that is worth THAT MUCH.
    I'd say.. because of cost of raising them from puppies as well as training.. $2000ish would be fair.
     
  7. RBark

    RBark Got Floof?

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    Oh, I do like working with dogs too. My puppy fever is entering nuclear reactive levels, as some may have noticed. I'd take a pup in a heartbeat if I could, and I'd love to raise another pup of my own. But I'd settle for a good pup, no matter whether it's 2 months or 8 months old, as long as I could make it fit with my lifestyle. :)

    EDIT: Tons of comments came in while I posted lol. I should note that I've known this person for many, many years and am relatively familiar with her training style.

    If that were not the case, I would definitely not buy a pup from a breeder that trains with harsh corrections.
     
  8. BostonBanker

    BostonBanker Active Member

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    Me personally? No. But I do think it is something for which there is probably a decent market. The price would have to be lower though. I think even something like $2000 or $3000 might sell. People are paying nearly that for puppies half the time. A ten month old or 15 month old dog of the same quality, who is housebroken, crate trained, walks nicely on a leash and comes when called? Heck, you've hit the holy grail for a lot of people.
     
  9. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    Depends on what I'm buying for but sure... if my purposes were big and my time to train small.. why not?

    There is an advantage to owning a green older dog - just as there is an advantage to owning a fully trained dog.

    Personally I think a high price for this is good. You are after all getting an animal someone has invested a crap ton of time in to prepare, socialize and raise right.
     
  10. Kilter

    Kilter New Member

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    A lot of rescues fit that bill, housebroken, basic training, spayed and neutered too, and even purebred in some cases. They still have to scramble for homes sometimes and they don't charge that much.
     
  11. Paige

    Paige Let it be

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    I can see the appeal. People do it with horses. Why not dogs?
     
  12. Toller_08

    Toller_08 Active Member

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    I would not because I love training dogs, but I think it is an awesome idea for other people. I know a couple people who would love to have a nicely mannered dog already trained. Not for that price, though. I've actually thought about raising a dog for two relatives who would enjoy the companionship of a dog but aren't knowledgeable or very into a lot of training but would still be good owners.
     
  13. Flyinsbt

    Flyinsbt New Member

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    Not for those prices!
     
  14. Whitewave

    Whitewave New Member

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    I could see some people liking it, but me personally I wouldn't mind it, but no way in heck would I pay that for a dog just b/c of training.

    I prefer puppies to train myself, part of the bonding experience. Or rescue dogs. I don't mind working through certain issues with dogs. Plus I'm not big on formal obedience. Come when I call, sit (don't even care if it is a "sloppy"sit), down, walk ok on a leash and don't eat my house and I can live just fine with a dog. But again I prefer sighthounds who as a rule aren't big on obedience anyways! Most of my dogs "sit" for a treat. Ronon's trick is eat the cookie! :)
     
  15. CaliTerp07

    CaliTerp07 New Member

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    We've spoken tons in our agility club about how it would be great if green handlers could get an experienced dog to start out on. It's so difficult for someone who is clumsy and awkward to be running a dog who can't read signals yet, and just multiplies the frustrations and errors.

    I think there could absolutely be a market for pre-trained dogs of any kind.
     
  16. Southpaw

    Southpaw orange iguanas.

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    Uhhh definitely not for that price!

    Personally if I were looking for an adult dog, I'd rather go through rescue. Oftentimes they already come as good companions, sure maybe there might be some things that need to be worked on depending on what exactly you're looking for in a dog. But that's fine with me. "Fully trained" means different things to different people...
     
  17. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

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    This. I've had people tell me their dog is, "Fully obedience trained" and I'm like, "Oh, does he have his Utility title?" LOL

    I would likely not ever buy a pre-trained dog, for sports or as a pet. I would probably have to undo/change quite a bit. That's not because I'm teh worldz best trainer or anything, just that, I dunno, my training and interactions are really specific, especially competitive stuff, and so much depends on the dog reading me a certain way, etc. That kind of stuff.

    I would, however, love to borrow an experienced agility dog to teach myself how to handle. *sigh* My greatest frustration in agility is wishing I was a better handler. LOL
     
  18. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    I have always thought this should be. Yet often there are dogs in shelters and rescues who fit this criteria and they languish because people still have the idea they need to get a puppy for it to love them.

    People will pay $$$ for a puppy yet that same puppy a few months later, and many skills 'smarter' is now worth next to nothing.

    My friend who has Snip loved the fact he came fully trained. He even was skilled in JRT stuff so all she has to do is take him to a trial and he knows what to do.

    IME horse people are more willing to see the value of a trained dog. Who wants to raise a weanling? VS a nicely started 4 years old lol!
     
  19. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    I wouldn't but then again Summer was practically already trained when I got her as far as basic manners. So maybe I technically already have, lol. I would buy an adult if they fit what I want in a dog. But I wouldn't pay premium price for one that is already trained.
     
  20. Psyfalcon

    Psyfalcon Fishies!

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    Well, you shouldn't ride baby horses, right? So there is automatically a year or two that you have to wait until your baby horse is ready. How early can you have them in an unweighted saddle learning?

    Dogs you can have walking on a leash and house trained in a month or so if you're good or lucky. After that you can do most pet dog things. Sure it will need ongoing training but most dogs do. (Ruby seems to have forgotten down!)

    Unless it was a big prospect for a dog sport, why bother. People buy protection dogs because they want one now, not in 2 years. Hunters who are not dog people want a dog that will find their birds. Agility? Most people wont bother because its a game they do with their dog.
     

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