What's on the bottom of your whelping box? HipDys Vs sanitation

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by ~WelshStump~, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. ~WelshStump~

    ~WelshStump~ New Member

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    Posted this on another forum, but this one is more active so thought I'd ask here too. This is in regards to the "Corgi cam" which has it's own thread else where if you want to watch it yourself.

    So, this discussion came up on The Daily Corgi facebook page, it was in regards to a new "puppy cam" on YouTube where Pem puppies are being highlighted, and the author mentioned how they didn't like the lack of a blanket in the bottom of the area. This is something that I was quite upset with to, you can see the pups strain now at around 3 weeks as they try to walk but can't and just end up sliding, it looks awful. Anyway, after reading this article and from what I've heard from other breeders/owners/vets over the years about how slick floors can worsen hip dysplasia, I see this as a bad situation for the puppies. So, the owner of these dogs reason for not allowing the pups a secure surface to toddle on?
    So, breeders, puppy raiser, what's on the bottom of you whelping boxes? Why? What are your thoughts on this subject?
    And...GO! :popcorn:
     
  2. Dizzy

    Dizzy Sit! Good dog.

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    Considering dogs raise puppies in slums, holes in the ground, during storms, in barns, sheds, comfy houses, posh whelping boxes, grass, mud, ice, snow, sand......

    I really wouldn't be all that concerned :/

    But I am not a breeder, and that's probably why :D
     
  3. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    Well that's purely because if you do it right your litter will fail, if you're a byb your litter will thrive.

    In all seriousness though the breeders I worked for used newspaper and varying height cardboard boxes and shavings. They didn't use fabric from what I remember probably because of the cleaning factor but I could be wrong.
     
  4. YodelDogs

    YodelDogs New Member

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    I use a blanket, folded flat not wadded up, while they are very young. The dam cleans the pups so there is no smell and barely any soiling. I change out the blanket daily. Sanitation is no issue.

    When the pups are up and walking, they have numerous play sessions daily in my kitchen. The floor is vinyl. The surface is a bit slippery to toddling babies but it has never caused any problems.
     
  5. ~WelshStump~

    ~WelshStump~ New Member

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    So they're not on it 24/7 though?

    And what of grass and going outside? I was on youtube some time ago and saw a video of 3-4 week old puppies playing outside in the grass, more natural surface if you ask me, but as to the argument of germs, hmm...?
     
  6. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    Unless its a public park frequented by dogs I wouldn't worry.
     
  7. release the hounds

    release the hounds Active Member

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    i really grow tired of the "Germ" argument for everything. Don't throw your puppies in a pile of ****, don't drink sewer water and don't worry about everything so much. You're not going to avoid germs, ever.
     
  8. speedydogs

    speedydogs Allons-y!

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    We use a washable "whelping pad" when they are very young - absorbent, soft, waterproof on the bottom - good traction for puppies. Then when they get older we use fleece (changed twice daily) with a newspaper layer underneath. Once they're three weeks old or so they're out frequently for playtime in the kitchen (linoleum) or outside in the fenced in yard. By the time they're eight weeks old they spend a good deal of time outside, if the weather's nice enough. I'd never keep them on a hard surface 24/7.

    I also dislike the "germ" argument. Obviously you have to be careful about communicable disease, so we have visitors wash hands and take off shoes, wash the older dogs' feet if we take them anywhere, etc. But I think it's a bad idea to raise puppies in a totally sterile environment; just like kids, they need a chance to let their immune systems develop.
     
  9. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    Our whelping box has an open bottom. The room had a carpet, so we taped a tarp down.

    For bedding I used washable fabric hospital chucks. Exactly like these:

    http://www.unhealthinessroom.com/Reusable-Washable-waterproof-bed-pad

    Then I changed them out several times a day and washed them. I had enough to always have clean ones. It worked out great. 2x a day I'd put the puppies in a bin and swab off the tarp and inside of the box with bleach water. It was pretty important to me because of Kaia's incision.

    ETA: The light blue things are the chucks
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    I use towels. Usually 4 a day and then we switch to chips when they go to solids.
     
  11. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    I was lucky because Kaia still ate their poo after they switched to solids. Also, it's summer so they got to go straight outside and play in their puppy yard all day long getting all grassy and dirty like puppies should. I don't know how people handle big winter litters, that would insane.
     
  12. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    This next litter will be my first dealing with sand outside instead of lawn. It should be "interesting."
     
  13. Kilter

    Kilter New Member

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    With the foster litter, I had a huge box of old computer paper (the stuff with the holes on the sides in long sheets) and sat and shredded bags and bags of it. That worked quite well as bedding and when they started to move, added a shavings section for bathroom duties.

    I liked it because when it got dirty, it was just tossed out and replaced, no laundry to do. It was nice and deep but not so bad that the pups got tangled up really since it wasn't long shreds.

    Not sure if I'd do it again, debating, have a good year and a half at least to even think of it. Then again thinking about 'reusable whelping box that's solid' and 'cardboard boxes that are recycled afterwards so no germies.... hmmm....
     
  14. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    I loved having a solid whelping box. It was really well designed with nice TALL sides, so kept them from climbing out until they were three weeks old. That was super handy. After than an X pen gave me another week before they had to spend days outside.

    My guys would have destroyed a cardboard whelping box within minutes. :rofl1: Plus you can't wash cardboard, so it would really start to stink. Puppies love to poo-paint. It's not hard to sterilize sealed wood. Just bleach water and you're good.
     
  15. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    I should take pictures of the prairie dog town the borzois dug in their sand pit. :rofl1: Be prepared for your dogs to have no white.
     
  16. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    I'm not sure I could allow unvaccinated puppies outside on surfaces that can't be sanitized ever again. My litter that got Parvo never left our property but were outside a great deal, as they were mid-summer puppies. Pravo is not solely a concern of places where people take dogs, it's found in most environments. I've become rather paranoid about Parvo after those puppies got it. My puppies are now kept indoors or allowed outside only in an expen on the deck, after the deck has been bleached and covered with a blanket. Every person who comes into the house spays their shoes with bleach, takes them off and leaves them at the door, washes their hands and arms and depending on where they came from changes clothes before interacting with the puppies - every time.

    My puppies have all been born in plastic wading pools. I always offered blankets at first but my girls never like them in the pool with the pups, so after the first day or so I just stop offering them. Never had an issue with the surface but then, by 3 weeks they're usually out of the box and have to be moved to a puppy room:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. YodelDogs

    YodelDogs New Member

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    When they are awake they spend most of their time running around the kitchen. I litterbox train them as soon as they are toddling about so cleanliness isn't a big deal. They go back into the puppy pen (also located in the kitchen) for naps and overnight. A quick mopping after each play session keeps everything clean and fresh smelling.

    [​IMG]

    Basenji puppies are born in the winter so their time outside is restricted by the weather. If it isn't too cold I will put little homemade sweaters on them and let them play a while in my yard.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
  18. ihartgonzo

    ihartgonzo and Fozzie B!

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    I was REALLY bothered by the barren, hard surface and edges of the whelping area too. :( It just looks too sterile - and not comfortable. I don't buy the excuse of bacteria, as that would not be an issue if the blankets/bedding were being changed and cleaned frequently! Just the floor needs to be cleaned frequently!

    I had never heard of hard floors in the whelping area causing HD. That's awful.
     
  19. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    And I have known puppies who were killed or seriously injured from getting caught up in blankets in the whelping box. There is risk to everything, most breeders do what they feel is best based on their experience and what has worked for them.
     

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