What to Expect When Raising a Puppy

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by Doberluv, Jul 3, 2005.

  1. rousseau661

    rousseau661 nook the crook

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    you da man, thanks/.
     
  2. xPwincessJaffa96x

    xPwincessJaffa96x New Member

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    Yay! My puppy's normal! :D I'm happy! But I can't teach it how to sit and stuffs. Can someone tell me a forum so I can teach my 9 week old pomeranian some easy but basic tricks? :?
     
  3. coolkidd

    coolkidd New Member

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    Hey thanks for writing this, it helped me a lott with my new six and a half week old puppy. Its really really helpful to new puppy ownerss. (=
     
  4. Jane

    Jane New Member

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    Yes, we always had rescue dogs and not puppies, and we thought our little Yellow Lab was a problem child. But after reading this and going to class, we know that she is just a normal and active youngster. By gentle correction and lots of love and treats, she is not chewing our carpets to smithereens any more. And we take her to the beach daily for getting the energy out, and she is starting to retrieve tennis balls, so things are working out very well.
    Telling new puppy owners what to expect, and if theyve not had a puppy for years and years, is a very important service.
    And we thank you for all this info, its sure helped us.

    We have tons of toys for her, and by rotating them, she isnt bored, but they do easily tire of a group of toys, so you really have to come up with new stuff!
    We discovered that an ice cube to push around on our hardwood floors is just a blast! She did this for over an hour, we used several cubes, and she had a ball.
    Just need to figure out the fun stuff that they like and provide new ideas constantly. Then they wont shred your grandkids hands or eat your shoes and gloves.
    jane
     
  5. Jumpingbean

    Jumpingbean New Member

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    Thanks for the overview! I am looking forward to all of it. What a challenge!

    jumping bean
     
  6. Jane

    Jane New Member

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    And find doggies who are about her age, and let them play together. This is a wonderful way to expend energy and they will be a bit more careful after biting a youngster the same age, they learn quickly.
    And the fun is great to watch.
    The beach is great as we can let her off the leash there.
    Jane
     
  7. McGregor

    McGregor New Member

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    How long do you punish a puppy if he/she is continually doing something bad? I know he's super young (8weeks, daschund M) and will mess around. I just don't want to encourage bad habits. . .
     
  8. Jane

    Jane New Member

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    Never punish harshly, do the opposite by giving lots of praise when they do the right thing. If they are continually doing bad things, then change what he is doing, like substituting a toy, diverting his attention, go out for a walk, anything like that.
    At 8 weeks its like a 10 month old human baby, punishing will only make the youngster worse, as they really cannot understand what they are doing.
    But if you say "NO" or "Leave It", then immediatly divert either the dog or the kids attention, that works.
    Lilly chewed the corner of our living room rug, but after about 20 "Leave Its" with immediate toy substitution, that stopped.
    If you over correct, the youngster will get defensive or sneaky, and then youve got new problems.
    Hope this helps,
    Jane
     
  9. lilpaws

    lilpaws New Member

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    puppy messes

    my puppy a miniature Dachshund Odie is 41/2 months old and still messing in the house please any advice?:
     
  10. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    Do a search in this forum or in the Training forum. There are many threads answering this exact question. :)
     
  11. Jane

    Jane New Member

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    You might have to take him out more often, some pups mature more quickly than others.
    And if he is going on a rug, you might have to throw away that rug, as rugs cannot be completely de-odorized.
    We tossed out our living room rug and are using the bare oak floors until next winter. Then we will get a new rug.
    With time, he will be OK. Dogs usually make mistakes until they are at least 6 months. Especially if they are tired.
    Here is an example, 3 weeks ago, our Lilly who is 10 months old had been swimming and playing all day long with us, and about 9 pm we were sitting on the sofa watching a ball game on TV, and Lilly was on my lap.
    She let go! She was so tired that she didnt wake up until she had peed all over my lap and the sofa. The sofa is old,,,,,my husband and I were laughing so hard that poor Lilly didnt know what we were laughing at.
    And our 9 year old grandson did the same thing, he was overtired from swimming all day too.
    So as you see, it will happen now and then with both kids and dogs.
    So dont get discouraged, its just what youngsters do.
    Jane
     
  12. a.baker

    a.baker New Member

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    I love what was said about picking out a dog breed that fits your wants in a dog. I also like the way it was put how one needs to learn the "doggy language" to understand what their dog needs and why they do what they do.

    I think personally until a dog is any where from 1 1/2 years old to 3 years old is when they start calming down and acting more like an adult dog. But temperament matters too of course. And patience is always the key.
     
  13. Pitty

    Pitty New Member

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    You explain realy good. Thanks for sharing. You are so right. I remember the first I got my dog, she was 2 months old and sometimes I get crazy what she did in the house. But you know you cannot getting that much angry while they are looking at our eyes..
     
  14. youbetcha1018

    youbetcha1018 New Member

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    Dogs can be neutered as young as 8 weeks of age, DEFINITELY have this done. It will prevent many future problems and will help curb pet overpopulation. So far you sound like you are making an excellent puppy owner. Obedience training can start any time, i strongly recommend that it be started early. The puppy should stop teething when its adult teeth come in at 4-6 months, but some dogs continue doing it as long as you let them.
     
  15. JoshDT33

    JoshDT33 New Member

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    The original post was a good read and should be some good information for me. I skimmed through the rest. I am new to this site and new to owning a dog. I still yet to actually get my dog, but I am getting a Golden Retriever Collie Mix from the local spca. He is only 3 months old and he is at the vet getting neutered as we speak. So I have been looking up information on how to raise this guy.
     
  16. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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  17. JoshDT33

    JoshDT33 New Member

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    Just got him 2 days ago. Everything is going well so far. I've read up on training and the biggest thing so far is crate training. I have to have him short term confined for the time being and I guess I need to make his kennel more of a positive place for him because he is looking at it as a negative one right now. He cries a bit after being in it but stops shortly after. I read up on it and just need some time to practice a few things. I can't remember the website but it might have been something like Housebreaking A Puppy In 7 Days or something like that. There's some good info on there.
     
  18. Great info here..My puppy keeps biting our older dog who's much bigger but too gentle to put the puppy in his place. The puppy runs following the older dog and doesn't give him any peace. Any advice?
     
  19. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Way back when I first wrote this article, I had some different ideas about dogs. Since that time, I've done a lot more research and that combined with my own observations have led me to the conclusion that some of what was in that article is incorrect. The main thing that I need to make clear is that I no longer believe that dogs have a rigid, organized hierarchy. Evidence now exists that domestic dogs are not true pack animals and unwanted behavior mistakenly taken for pack behavior is nothing more than a lack of training. I believe that dogs are done a disservice by attributing their behavior to faulty reasoning, such as their desire to establish a particular ranking system or to consciously take control. Unwanted behavior is the result of a lack of training or improper handling. Consequences...the laws of learning are what drive behavior, not something humans have imagined about what is in a dog's mind. Training with benevolence and understanding of learning behavior of dogs is your best tool. Keep words like "dog pack," "dominance," "alpha," "rank," "hierarchy" out of your vocabulary when talking about domestic dogs. Those things have nothing to do with how our dogs behave.



    What to Expect When Raising a Puppy (Revised version.)

    Raising dogs is not easy. Raising children is not easy. We sometimes expect a puppy to turn into a well behaved, mature dog in an instant. Just like children, growing up is a gradual process. We know our toddlers will take many years to become mature, well adjusted adults. Although a dog’s lifespan is shorter, there is still a time frame for growth and development. There is much to learn and attention spans are short. Patience and keeping our expectations reasonable is the key. The more we understand of canine behavior, the better our puppies will develop into the well mannered, obedient adults we envision.*

    Many people acquiring a new puppy are horrified at the puppy’s “misbehavior;” chewing their best pair of Reboks into a state of non-recognition, destroying their Grandmother’s Oriental rug, leaving piles of unidentifiable, body waste products and in general, causing untold chaos in their unleashed enthusiasm for life. What many people don’t realize is that these things that puppies do are absolutely normal. This is not misbehavior to a dog’s way of thinking. They are not human and don’t have a clue how to live like a human being. It is up to us to show them the way. Communication and patience is what it takes to educate these wild beasts to co-exist with us, to take them from their near wildness into the warmth our family homes.

    But how do we communicate with an animal who can’t speak our language and we can’t speak theirs? We do the best we can and learning some of their language and teaching them some of ours is the only way we can connect with our beloved pets. If we do not educate ourselves, our fantasizing of a lovely, well mannered dog, which is also happy and spirited is not likely to come to fruition. If we know that our young pup is teething and not at all aggressive, but instead is at a stage of assertiveness or that our once willing and obedient puppy is now an adolescent and is testing the waters, we could save ourselves a lot of frustration. By setting realistic expectations in keeping with a dog’s normal developmental stages, we will make a rough road a lot smoother.

    What to expect:
    7 – 12 weeks

    Your puppy’s ability to focus and attention span are short. He has very little bladder and bowel control. He will need constant supervision. He needs to be encouraged with positive reinforcement and he needs to bond with people and get accustomed to new surroundings.*

    While he’s this young, he will tend to follow you closely and look to you for security. He knows little or nothing of what you expect of his behavior. Your puppy will be capable of learning simple, basic commands; sit, down, stay, come. You’ll need to keep his lessons short and fun.

    Socialize your new puppy to different people, friendly dogs who have been vaccinated and that you know and various environments gradually, but steadily. Make sure each experience is pleasant and that nothing frightens your puppy. Make your socialization exercises active vs. passive. Pair tasty treats with those novel things he comes across. Don’t just let the dog be exposed to them and hope for the best. Socialization can tend to wear off because fear tends to be the default setting in animals. So, continue socialization for the life of your dog. It may not have to be as extensive and purposeful as it is with your pup, but do keep up with new experiences and positive associations for your dog.

    What to expect:
    4 – 8 months

    The pup is becoming much more self assured and is very busy. He won’t come when called and won’t obey very well. He’ll be relentless in attention seeking behavior, barking, stealing, and running off. He may seem deliberately vindictive but he’s really just trying to be what he best knows how to be...a dog. He will need to be shown that calm, obedient and gentle behavior is what will win your attention and affection. Reward him for coming close to you and for good behavior. Leaving a leash on him, but supervised will help you be able to reinforce your commands. He will also need some good exercise and plenty of romping.*

    What to expect:
    9-12 months

    Your adolescent is now a sweet, compliant darling one minute and a defiant, independent rouge the next. He has a constant struggle between his good sense which you have worked all this time to instill and his sexual hormones which are beginning to course through his body. He is going to be testing you on an ongoing basis, making you wonder if he doesn’t have a serious personality disorder. This is the time to turn up the speed on your obedience training. He’ll need refresher courses on what you have already taught him. Increase exercise according to his breed and needs.

    What to expect:
    18 – 24 months

    This is the time when your young adult dog might try to exhibit more protective or territorial behavior than in previous stages. This is where we hear of a lot of aggression problems, resource guarding and over protectiveness starting to materialize. Exercises that pair the “bad thing” with his favorite things are actively taught and should have been in practice from day one. But keep on with these lessons. Showing Buster that to “give” you his toy means he’ll get his toy right back plus a treat, will teach him that it’s a good thing when people have to take something from him. Getting him accustomed to people hanging around when he’s eating is a way to prevent resource guarding. Without harassing him at meal times, once or twice, toss into his bowl a chunk of cheese or steak.. Show him that people coming near means better things are on the way. Always supervise children around any dog at all times and be especially watchful when the dog has something of value.


    Be sure you research the breed you’re interested in and understand what job it was bred to do. This has a huge bearing on temperament and will make or break your relationship with your dog. Is the job it was bred to do and the personality which goes along with it, in keeping with your lifestyle? If you have certain expectations of a dog, a relaxed, unfettered, outgoing, friendly dog and you get a high maintenance protection dog that requires more than the average amount of involvement, you will be in for the ride of your life.*

    Finally, all thinking mammals learn best by the use of a motivational and reward system of training. Punishment has little use in teaching anyone and if we don’t take the time in understanding canine behavior and can’t identify their motives and developmental stages, our expectations will be out of line with their capabilities. A bond will never be fully realized and our relationship with our canine pals is the very most important tool in training that we have and they don’t sell that in pet stores. Learn all you can, be involved with your best friend and this will help you know what to expect and will keep you both on a forward moving and happy course.



    by Carrie
     
  20. BriBri

    BriBri New Member

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    Do you by chance know how to get the pee smell out of carpet!?
     

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