What does it take...

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by Maxy24, Aug 10, 2007.

  1. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    To own a Pit bull breed? I've been thinking about what breeds I might want in the future, have asked you guys and Pit Bulls never come up on my list. It's probably because I always ask for a dog friendly breed and I know it is common for Pit Bulls to be DA. But heck, maybe I'll just get one, it's fine with me as long as I have a dog who i can love. Or I could do what many of you do and just keep them separated while they can't be watched. I also say i want a large dog but they can be large (they will not be from breeders, they will be shelter dogs). I know you have to take a lot of $h!t from people but i almost want to as i walk my beautiful, well behaved, obedient dog by my side.

    other than that what are these breeds like? Energy, training, with cats, with kids, with strangers etc. Grooming requirements, common health problems and any other personality things about them. Also is there any difference in temperament between the three most common pit Bull breeds (Amstaff, APBT, Staffys)?

    I've really been considering them for my next dog (keep in mind I'm 15, we got a lot of years before I'm through high school, college and able to support a dog on my own).
     
  2. Sapphire-Light

    Sapphire-Light woof!

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    My pit bull Turok was very obidient and he was lazy.

    He was very alert of strangers, and bark harder and harder as they came near.

    He was very sweet and loved to play, and easy to groom.

    Since you have 15, I recomed to ask a expericed trainer to train it since they are really strong even as puppies and can easily pull you in a walk, they are going to walk you if they are not well trained and not the vise versa :lol-sign:

    He had some dominance troubles with our GSD/malinois since the shephedr mix was extremely nervious and dominant and he always whanted to dominate other dogs by jumping over them, and the pit didn't like that, but they never fighted.

    That's the only experience I had until he had to be taken uotside of the city to my dad's farm 'cause the breed banning, but when he was there, he wasen't agresive with other dogs. (it was only wit the shepherd)

    *edit* I think a pit bull is better for an adult person 'cause how strong they are.

    Also you can try by asking a person that has one to walk it a little and see if you can manage it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2007
  3. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    A very thick skin (for public opinion) and some strong arm muscles. :) And the ability to discern between "oh, he's just playing" and "your dog is about to be lunch". Which I think you know how to do already.
     
  4. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    I can do all that I'm sure. Just have to keep myself from punching someone in the face is all. As far as their strength, you should have seen Max, he was Strong and had no leash manners (I didn't try hard enough, I felt stupid stopping every two steps on out walks but I will never make that mistake again, I don't care what anyone thinks seeing me). I was the only one who could walk him except my dad but my dad thought it was appropriate to yank the choke chain over and over and hit Max with the leash when he got frustrated with his pulling. Yeah Dad that worked :rolleyes: Anyway I think I can handle all that. I'm good with dog body language for the most part, I have to read some more books though, particularly with clashing signals (showing some aggressive body language but also some fear etc.) but by the time I get a dog I expect to know what I'm doing.

    I won't be getting the dog until I am an adult, I'm just thinking ahead is all. I still think I could handle one though, I wish one of my friends had a Pit Bull I could meet, but none of them do. I have met the neighbor's mix and the people's down the street when she was a puppy.
     
  5. Labra

    Labra New Member

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    At 15, I wouldn't be worrying too much about future dogs. Specific breeds, anyway. A lot can happen between now and then.

    I do not have much experience with Pit Bull's but I do with Staffordshire Bull Terriers (Staffies). I think they are great dogs but you have to realise their potential for dog aggression. They are not the breed for everyone.

    Aside from potential of dog aggression as an owner of one of these breeds you must also be willing to accept the negative stigma that is attached to them.
     
  6. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    Fantasizing about future dog is really all I have right now (sad I know), I'm dogless and will be until I'm out of college. I figured learning now wouldn't hurt, plus i would know if they are really what I want. I know my living situation will change and if it would not be good for a Pit Bull then I won't get one. I have grown to like them so much more since being here on Chaz. I will be able to handle the negative things said I think, I'll go to a state with little chance of BSL (which will also change by the time I can get a dog). As of now I like them and think I could own one, if that changes then I'll look into other breed. As of now it's something I can occupy my time with,researching these breeds. I like to think about the future :D
     
  7. Boemy

    Boemy New Member

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    Some have prey drive and can't live with cats, some are fine with cats. I googled around and Pit Bull Rescue Central recommends not letting the dogs play with the cats (too easy for them to hurt the cats by accident), but to allow gentle licking, sniffing, and sleeping together.
     
  8. Bahamutt99

    Bahamutt99 Dafuq?

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    I don't find the breed that difficult to own, but then again, I've been around them for years. You just have to have reasonable expectations, and know beforehand what these dogs are, and what they aren't. I also recommend you have a reason for wanting a dog with that kind of drive, like some kind of sport. It establishes a much healthier relationship to have your dog working for/with you. Not everybody does licensed competition; you can improvise a job for the dog to do.
     
  9. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    I'm on the fence here . Having dogs before children , I never wanted a breed that I might have to give up after a family . I really admire all you pitty owners here ....especially the rescued one . There are too many put down all over because of bad breeders and owners .
     
  10. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    Yeah I would be willing to do a sport with him. what sort of sports do they generally like/excel in?
     
  11. elegy

    elegy overdogged

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    there's no reason why you'd have to give up a pit bull in order to have a family. if the dog is that unstable that you wouldn't trust him around kids, he should probably be euthanized, not passed on.

    i read somewhere not too long ago that with all the pit bull fatalities, there has never been a case of a single, speutered pit bull kept as a house dog who has killed a person. that's food for thought, no?

    anyway, thick skin is a must. and you really can't be a pushover of an owner. these dogs are smart dogs, and they're athletic dogs, and many of them want what they want and are pretty determined about getting it. "because i said so" isn't usually a good enough answer for a smart dog :)

    you also need to be aware that it's harder to get homeowners or renters insurance, and that BSL is a significant threat that may necessitate all kinds of nonsense from having to move at short notice because the authorities are requiring all pit bulls be gone, to muzzling your dog in public, to posting signs, to having extra insurance.

    dog aggression is always an issue, but it's almost always manageable. it's a lot scarier, i think, when it's something you've never dealt with. prey drive toward cats/bunnies/small fuzzies is something you need to consider as well. they are terriers!

    grooming requirements are almost nil, aside from nails. some dogs do have significant skin and allergy issues, especially blue pit bulls. other health concerns include hip dysplasia, cruciate tears, hypothyroidism, and cancer.

    and bruises for you when they run into you with their fat heads :)
     
  12. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    This is my main (almost only) worry. I have two cats (who i hope will still be alive when I get my own place) so I need a dog who will not hunt them down. If i got a 2 or 3 year old from a shelter who is good with cats what are the chances that would change?

    Yeah I don't see why I might have to give up my dog to have a family. If that were the case then i would not get one in the first place.
     
  13. Sapphire-Light

    Sapphire-Light woof!

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    That's true.

    the workers at my dad's farm say Turok killed a skunk in the first week he came there O-o

    You have to cosiderate the posibility that some family members or friends of your even if they likes dogs they are goin to say things like

    "get rid of it, is goin to attack you"

    "why do you whant that?"

    "you are crazy"

    "stuped dog"

    "is goin to bite me"

    "be carefull"

    And other things, I think they say this thing, not beacause they animals, but more 'cause they care about your safety, they are still many people who belive pit bulls are blood thristy killers.


    Also you need to have a plan if the goverment in your city desides to ban the breed; if it wasen't that my dad has a farm where we can take Turok, he had to put to sleep.

    They just one day in the newspaper they say

    "all the pit bulls,dogo argentinos, fila brasileiros and any type of bull terrier" have a one week deathline of getting out of this city or any police or vet that sees one have the order of conficate the dog and sacrifice it, plus a bill of $500"
     
  14. pitbullpony

    pitbullpony BSL Can Be Beaten

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    Hey Maxy24; I was sort of in the same spot as you; but I was older (24) when I got my APBT Indy. I decided when I moved out of my house and on my own that I wanted an APBT, so set about researching; I was interested in a registered dog, joined a local club for them so I could hang out and learn about the various temperaments, joined a local Responsible Dog Owner's club that was focussed on taking dog owner's to a responsible view on their large breed misunderstood dogs (mostly APBT, Rotties, Dobes). Learned lots and my dog trainer friend was given an APBT pup as a payment for lessons, after asking if I would like him.
    Indy was amazing, loved everyone, would get in anyone's car to go for a ride (and often did), would go next door to visit my neighbour for treats, went to horseshows and dog shows and carnivals - he did a lot for our town with regards to "pitbull" perception.
    It helped immensely that he was stone cold - no aggression to other dogs or cats; the only time I saw an aggressive move from him was when I was walking the baby in the baby buggy and a Rottie came running out barking and carrying on - Indy got between the buggy and the dog quite quickly and started puffing up in that intense "pitbull" look that is so common to hotter dogs; I however leashed him and just kept walking; once we were by the Rottie; no worries.
    Indy was very obedient; not necessarily the fastest at responding; but corrections needed were minimal.
    He was not a guard dog; no barking if someone pulled up to the door; simply met them at the door with tail wagging. Everyone who warned me that he was going to eat the children or myself or etc, etc. was happily surprised at what a clown he truly was. I dearly miss my big goober. Here he is with my son.
    [​IMG]
    Conversely, my dog trainer friend acquired a red/red nose bitch from California (or so was claimed by the trucker that dropped the puppy into her hands at her training facility).
    Lucy is still around; lovely dog; has some skin problems. Very obedient as well, and again the world's biggest suck. She is more loyal to her owner than Indy was; she'd at least look back to see if my friend cared if Lucy left with someone else. She however will eat cats (has tried - one cat has a 1/2 tail after it stuck out from under the bathroom door) and doesn't like other dogs in her face; she will tolerate some non-intrusive dogs; usually opposite sex, seems to really NOT like other terriers.
    Both dogs were fine with each other (when I visited) but Indy didn't particularily care if other dogs were around; and that suited Lucy just fine.

    I think the worst thing from a "pit bull" is that intense screaming that they do when they want something - Indy did it when I tethered him outside so I could go in and buy us some icecream, Lucy does it still (she's 9 now) when she is in the vet's waiting room and there are cats around.

    Management is the key for these breeds; but barring possible dog aggression/cat aggression (which if you are adopting an older dog from the shelter should be already evaluated) I would definitely consider a APBT; I would still consider one in my position; however my lovely province has banned them and there are some serious POS dogs out there; because the responsible breeders can't breed.
     
  15. Bahamutt99

    Bahamutt99 Dafuq?

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    Weight pull is a big one for this breed. I do obedience and agility with my dog, both of which she's quite good at. (The only question of the latter two sports is whether your dog can be trusted off-lead with other dogs in the vicinity.) There are people who do dock diving with their APBTs. And other folks do Schutzhund or French Ring. Really, these guys have the versatility to do a lot of different things.
     
  16. Rosefern

    Rosefern New Member

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    I'm confused. :confused: Why would you think that? But forgive me, it's late, and I've been extremely exhausted these past few weeks.

    You have a fairly good chance that that won't change. :) By the age of 2-3, their personality, including DA, is pretty much set. Because, contrary to some beliefs, DA and prey drive cannot be socialized or trained out of APBT/AmStaffs, no more then herding drive can be trained out of border collies, or prey drive out of huskies. You can have dog-social APBTS, and BCs that won't herd, or huskies that are best friends with cats. But it really has little to do with training or socialization.

    -Rosefern
     
  17. Squishy22

    Squishy22 Guest

    I am a first time owner of an APBT. He is 8 months old.

    My experience with reggin....

    He has a TON of energy constantly. He gets bored very quick. He loves to chew and get into things if he is not watched or doesnt have enough toys. Crate training is a must, in my opinion. Pit bulls need to be walked every day and they live off of attention. They have very active minds and can figure things out quickly.

    He lives with 2 small dogs. A tiny chihuahua and a pug. He treats them like his siblings. Would NEVER hurt them or "hunt them down". If I had a cat, he would treat him just the same.

    As far as DA goes. Reggin loves playing with friendly dogs, but he is still a puppy. Very aloof of strange dogs, though. I have been to the dog parks many times and a lot of pit bulls love to bully other dogs around. Some pits cannot be around other dogs!

    Reggin LOVES people and kids. The only thing I worry about is reggin knocking a kid down from excitement, NOT aggression. He loves attention from everyone and anyone. He does get spooked by people walking by the house at night, and will bark to let me know.

    He is very strong at only 8 months. Strongest dog I have ever had at his age. I have had a german shepherd, chow, lab, and rottweiler in the past. Leash pulling can become a problem so expect training!!
     
  18. elegy

    elegy overdogged

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    just keep in mind that at 8 months, reggin is still very much a puppy. dog-aggression often does not set in until around 2 years of age, sometimes earlier sometimes later. so while he's happy and amiable around your small dogs and around dogs at the dog park now, that very well could change in the future. i would stop taking him to the dog park and i would be sure that you're separating him from your other dogs when you're not there to supervise.

    better to be safe than to have a tragedy on your hands that could have been avoided.
     
  19. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    Thanks so much you guys!! This is helping a lot. I feel more confident about getting one in the future. My main worries were cat problems and DA (mostly cat problems) so I will most likely be getting like a three year old. I wish I could one now, but there is College an the fact that my entire family hates Pits.

    guys like this (I over use Petfinder lol)
    http://search.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=9016403
    http://search.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=8856176
    http://search.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=9016764
    http://search.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=8769101
     
  20. Labra

    Labra New Member

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    If DA worries you, which is understandable, don't get a Pit. Not that I have anything against them, but there are many other breeds that prehaps match your criterea better than a Pit Bull does. I personally wouldn't consider bringing a dog into my home without fully knowing that I could care for its needs and that including managing (potentially) dog aggression. There are other Bully type breeds like the Boxer that might be worth looking into. Just some food for thought.
     

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