What do you think makes a GOOD BREEDER?

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by Fran101, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    Just thought id ask so post away!

    What do you think makes them good? what are some things you look for?

    For me.. its always the "if you cant keep the dog, we will take him/her back" to me that in itself sais I LOVE MY DOGS and i take responsibility for what im creating.

    If you have a link to your favorite breeder, go ahead and post it.

    Im sure answers will differ, thats what this thread is for :) for some its working their dogs, for some its showing, ect..
     
  2. PoodleMommy

    PoodleMommy Yorkie Love

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    Obviously fulfilling each of these things does not make someone a good breeder but this is what I look for...

    I look for someone who will honestly answer any question I pose to them.

    I look for someone who home rears their dogs... I want my puppy to come to me used to living in a house, not a cage. (Crate training is obviously a good thing, just not living in a cage/kennel)

    I prefer someone who has already started with good nutrition.

    I look for someone who cares about the quality/health of their dogs.

    *Im sure there is more, lol... thats what I can think of now.
     
  3. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    A good breeder is actively involved with the breed in order to stay current on what's going on healthwise. A good breeder does complete health testing on their dogs, proves their working abilities, can explain why they bred the pair they bred and what they hope to achieve. A good breeder will be honest about the faults of their dogs and how those faults effect their breeding decisions. A good breeder will ensure that I am prepared to own their breed and will take the time to educate me on the needs of the breed if necessary.
     
  4. My criteria might differ from what others feel is a good breeder, however, here it is:

    A good breeder:

    Does all health testing relevant to the breed.
    (For Rottweilers this means OFA screening for hips and elbows, CERF for eyes, and cardiac screening by an ACVIM Cardiologist. )

    Competes with their dogs in some venue

    Evaluates puppies honestly and sells all dogs with a fair contract and guarantee

    Plans breedings with improvement in mind

    Does not breed dogs who do not conform to the current breed standard or who have disqualifying faults

    Screens homes carefully to avoid inappropriate homes

    Does not allow the breeding of puppies graded and sold as pets

    Offers support and is available as a mentor to all buyers

    Will take back any dog for the duration of its lifetime if the owner is unable to keep it for any reason

    Supports breed rescue
     
  5. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    To me the first 8 weeks of a pup's life is so important . The breeder must spend tons of time with the pups . Plus everything Redy said .
     
  6. Nestnuuka

    Nestnuuka New Member

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    To me a good breeder is honest and care about his/her dogs and pups. A good breeder helps pups owner in any situations and if there is a situation where breeders knowledge isn't enough, he/she guides the pups owner to someone, who knows better. A good breeder cooperate with other breeders: Shares information about his/her own dogs and breeding (good and bad things).

    Nobody can't bred a breed by himself/herself so to me it's really important that people can cooperate and be honest what ever situation is.

    A good breeder is interested of his/her litters and try keep contact with the owners. He/she organize training camps and meetings for his/her puppies owners.

    A good breeder plans his/her breeding, don't just breed because wants to have some puppies. When a breeder choose breeding material, he/she don't look only mother and father dogs health results, characters etc. but also he/she looks what kind of dogs are in mother and fathers pedigree (cousin's and brothers&sisters also). Shortly he/she knows his/her breeding materials.

    A good breeder compete with his/her dogs and they have some results from working dog trials (this is what I look when I chose my belgians breeder) or somewhere else.

    A good breeder does health tests to as many littermates as possible and of cource she/he tests her/his own dogs also even if they aren't used for breeding.
     
  7. puppydog

    puppydog Tru evil has no pantyline

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    Health testing and breeding to better the breed.
    I am most interested in a breeder who competes with their dogs, whether it be in field trials or conformation. If I am going for a sporting dog, I want them to do what they were bred to do, so a field trail is far more important then the conformation ring.
    With my Paps, I like them to be finished.
     
  8. Southpaw

    Southpaw orange iguanas.

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    Health testing is important to me. I'm not savvy enough to know everything that a boxer should be tested for, but I do like to see OFA, cardiac, and thyroid testing.

    I also look for a meaningful guarantee. A 1 year health guarantee just isn't enough... Lucy came with a 1 year guarantee, and I'm not even kidding, less than a week shy of that 1 year is when her luxating patellas and legg perthes came to a head. I don't know what an ideal guarantee would be, but at least more than 1 year. My puppy comes with a lifetime guarantee, which is definitely long enough to satisfy me lol.

    I also think good breeders will take any dogs back, and be totally honest about their dogs and their breeding program. When it comes to boxers, cancer is an issue and I want to know if that's what the breeder's dogs die from, or if they get it at a young age.

    Those are the biggies off the top of my head.
     
  9. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

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    A good relationship with the breeder is SO important
    Health Testing of breeding and non-breeding dogs to get a complete picture
    Competing (I want to see the dogs doing what they were bred for, as well as other activities)
    Dogs live in the house and are true companions
    Does puppy imprinting
    Screens homes very carefully and is willing to take the puppy back
    Knowledgeable about training and nutrition and health care
     
  10. sprintime

    sprintime New Member

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    Breeding for the betterment of the breed and not just because you think your dog is special.
    Having all the necessary tests done. Making sure there is 3 generations of heath free issues in your dog's pedigree.
    Breeding to the standard the parent club has set forth and not trying for "rare" something .
    Temperament tested parents.
    Proving your dogs in the ring and titling your dogs.
    Having the experience and money to follow through with costs of breeding.
     
  11. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    I gotta disagree here. There are many breeds whose parent club has it wrong.

    In pemmies, I very much dislike the PWCCA's standard. The pemmie standards in the UK and in NZ are better.

    If I were going to breed corgis, I'd aim for something more like Ares in type - what corgis looked like in the 40's, when they could still work.
     
  12. ihartgonzo

    ihartgonzo and Fozzie B!

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    Health testing, titling in conformation/working trials, temperament testing, and a really good contract (lifetime health guarantee, will take back any puppy, pet dogs must not be bred and/or must be altered, etc) are BARE bare minimums for me.

    I would prefer that all of the dogs are Obedience trained, and hopefully compete in it, regardless of breed. I want proof that the dogs are stable, sane, eager to please, and posess a good off-switch. I also want to see any working breed doing the job they were bred to do on a regular basis and in real-life situations. I would love to see Therapy Dog titles on at least some of the dogs. The dogs should be socialized and sound around all types of people, children, other dogs and other animals. The dogs must not be kept in outdoor kennels, they must be a part of the family, and the puppies must be raised in the home.

    As far as the breeder, I STRONGLY prefer that the dogs are fed Raw. I STRONGLY prefer that the breeder practices limited vaccination with their dogs. I also STRONGLY prefer a breeder who allows even pet owners to wait until their puppy is physically/socially mature to alter them (with strict no-breeding clauses for pet dogs of course). It's really important that I befriend them... that they will spend time e-mailing and talking to me on the phone and allow me to visit any time. I want them to be interested in me, my dogs, and everything about the life that their puppy will have with me. I want them to care about my opinion, regarding what kind of puppy I want, as well as give me theirs. I want them to require that they visit me, or I visit them, on a regular basis after buying the puppy. I want them to be there for the lifetime of that puppy, no matter what. I want to be able to see, without doubt, that breeder's passion for their breed and for improving, maintaining, and protecting it.

    I suppose I'm kind of picky... but really, if a breeder cannot fit what I want, I would rather save a dog's life in rescue. (which is what happened when I decided to adopt Fozzie)
     
  13. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Totally with you here.

    For Filas, well, I have some very different standards as to what I want, based on how the dogs handle real life rather than competitions or sports. These are NOT a sport breed and should not be treated as such. I don't want to see my dogs doing bite work, schutzhund, etc., and I don't think there's much danger of any TRUE Fila ever competing in obedience trials of any sort, lol!

    Exercise type sports, like weight pull I do like to see them in -- it's good for them physically and for their confidence. SAR is a good venue, mainly because it is not a sport, it's real work. I don't want to deal with a Fila breeder who is allowing their dogs to go to law enforcement or military use or will place a dog to be used primarily as a guard, not as a companion.
     
  14. Squishy22

    Squishy22 Guest

    Aside from health testing, showing, breeding to the standard, etc... the list goes on. I have to say that the number one thing for me would be temperament. If I go through a breeder, their dogs better have proper, stable temperaments. Dogs with good nerves, period. I do not want a timid chihuahua nor do I want a rottweiler with a temperament of a golden.

    I also want to say that showing is very nice to see, but what I have noticed is that a lot of breeders show their males while they neglect to do so with their females. They have outstanding males while the females confirmations aren't as important to the breeder, for some reason. Breeders who do not show their dams. Just something I've noticed.
     
  15. Toller_08

    Toller_08 Active Member

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    My ideal breeder:

    Does all of the necessary health testing for their breed (OFA, CERF, etc.)

    Competes with their dogs in at least one venue, but hopefully more.

    Doesn't have anymore than 2 litters per year, and those litters should be out of different dogs.

    All dogs bred should be correct & sound in conformation, as per the written standard for most breeds. They should also be of correct temperament, first and foremost.

    Lifetime support is a must. They should be willing and able to answer all questions completely, and be there for you for the life of the dog.

    Any dog unable to be kept by the buyer should be returned to the breeder.

    Puts lots of time and effort into each breeding, striving to improve the breed/their breeding program.

    Must screen any and all potential homes, to be absolutely certain that their puppy will be well taken care of.

    Evaluates each puppy individually in order to be certain each puppy is placed in the correct home.

    Makes certain that the puppies are well on their way to being well socialized & introduced to normal house-hold things before leaving to their new homes.

    -----------------------------

    There's probably a few more that I could think of too, but those are the main ones. I love Keira's breeder. She doesn't compete/show in a lot of venues due to health/physical limitations, but she does always find a handler to show her dogs in conformation at least and other dogs in "pet homes" have other performance titles. Last year she did breed a bitch with no titles, but only because she almost completely lost her breeding program due to the fact that she breeds limitedly and her one bitch had to have an emergency spay and the other resorbed two breedings and also had to be spayed. The bitch she did breed last year could have her CH, but her owners didn't want her shown. The dog she bred her to did have his CH. though. I think that's completely excuseable, and didn't have a problem with that in the slightest. She does everything else on my list, and has been a fantastic mentor to me. I love her -- she's also ended up as one of my mom and I's best friends. I've learned so much from her it's unbelievable. Health and temperament are of upmost importance to her, and her Dobermans truly are some of the nicest tempered dogs I've ever been around. Wonderful longevity too.. she's had many live 13 years, and one who will be celebrating her 14th b-day this year. That's wonderful for a Doberman.

    My Toller breeder, OTOH, I can't speak as highly of, but she does do the majority of things on my list and was the most personable Toller breeder I talked to when looking for my first. Others turned me away instantly simply because I was only 16. So that adds something else to my list... a breeder must be open and willing to listen and talk to potential new buyers, and not discriminate right away just because someone may be new to the breed, young, uneducated about nutrition protocols etc.
     

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