What do you do?...

Discussion in 'Dog Rescue Forum' started by Purdue#1, Oct 8, 2006.

  1. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    What do you do when:

    your friend has an aussie that is destructive and no longer "cute" when they got it?
    when they want to get rid of the dog, but don't want to and by what she says, she does not like that dog?
    you can't have it?
    they won't use the rescue group that you looked up for them?
    her father wants to keep it because he loves the dog?
    You know the dog needs freedom and most of all a job?
    The dog's bored?


    What do i do?
     
  2. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    So the dad likes the dog, but your friend doesn't and so the dog isn't getting enough interaction and is being destructive?

    If the dad likes the dog so much, then he needs to step up and get involved with it more, preferable with some activity like agility, Rally-O or herding.

    Otherwise, push the rescue group on them more. I know that ARPH has a pretty active chapter in Indiana. They are great at finding the perfect home; I got my Aussie through them!
     
  3. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    They never have the time to play with the dog. she usually gets home late because of all the pratices she has. It is so called "attacking" their cats. it's really herding them. I told her that and she wouldn't listen. One of their outside cats was at the widow and she told the dog to get it. the dog hit the window in the process. the dog so far has chewed a hole in the wall, swallowed her dad's glasses, and destroyed numerous items of theirs. it needs a job.
     
  4. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    No kidding! Aussies do not tolerate being a sedate type of dog. Why did they get an Aussie in the first place? Because it was cute? Cute as they are, they're still little hellions as puppies...that should have clued them in. She also can't or at least shouldn't blame the dog for following a command she gave it.

    They really do need to face up to the fact that this is not the right dog for them. Or at least someone needs to get a lot more involved in training it...are there any sort of doggie daycares around your area? My dog's job is to be the daycare "ref" and he spends all day keeping order.
     
  5. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    no, she meant for the dog to hit the window. the dog was chasing the inside cat when she thought the dog was attacking it. he dad got the dog from a friend he knew. she said that the guy said it was a mini. It actually is, just the full 18in. I didn't know that until i looked up miniature aussies.
     
  6. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    there is also no doggy daycare within 45min to an hour of where we live. we live in the country where most dogs live outside and any stray or wandering dog is eventualy a dead dog. People don't like strays on their property or chasing their cattle.
     
  7. Sweet72947

    Sweet72947 Squishy face

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    Ohhh she thought that hitting the window would teach the dog not to chase the cat? It doesn't really work that way, unfortunately!

    I would just keep reminding her of a rescue group. It doesn't sound like she is willing to listen to your advice. They chose the wrong dog for their lifestyle. I hope this dog doesn't end up at the pound someday. :(
     
  8. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    she thought it as funny for the dog to hit the window. I don't think it would end up in a shelter. She said they are going to keep it if they can't find a home for it. they don't even try to find it a home though. she drags me into this then doesn't listen to a thing i say. the dog will live a lif of misery if they don't listen. I guess she thinks i will feel sad for it and take it in. I feel sad for it, but my mother said no. I can't take it in. I don't know. it just makes me sad and angry to think that there is a dog that is not doing what it should be doing and the owners are too busy and too stubborn to listen.:mad:
     
  9. sam

    sam New Member

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    I would tell her in no uncertain terms that keeping an aussie in that situation is completely cruel and will only lead to more and more trouble. A dog like that needs mental stimulation the way kids need food or toys.
    The longer she keeps the dog the more trouble the dog will have getting into a GOOD forever home.
    The problem with the cats may escalate and a cat could easily be injured or killed and it will be HER fault not the dog's.
    LOTS of people make the mistake of taking on a dog that is too much for them or their situation- it's what they do about it that sets them apart. The nice thing about purebred dogs is that there ARE breed specific rescue groups that will take the dog on and find it a suitable home.Keep on givng her the contact info for your nearest aussie rescue. I sure hope she listens to you. Poor dog :(
     
  10. Zoom

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    How about doing a fake-out? Tell you friend that your mom had a change of heart and then when you get the dog, go about calling up rescue or finding a good home for it yourself. Your friend can't get mad at you, she doesn't want the dog to begin with!
     
  11. AnimalLoverCatRescuer

    AnimalLoverCatRescuer New Member

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    haha I was going to suggest that too. That is a good idea. Take the dog from her finally and then turn it over to a rescue.
     
  12. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    that's what i thought, but then the what ifs started:

    what if she askes how the dog is doing?
    What if she askes my dad or mom?
    what if i envite her over and she asks about the dog? (this is why i think she wanted me to take it. she wants the dog, but doesn't want to do anything about the problems.)
    What if she askes one of my realitives about the new dog i got and they don't know how to respond so they tell her what happened to a dog i took in from a friend that went to a rescue group?
     
  13. mrose_s

    mrose_s BusterLove

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    god, tahst pretty bad. i'd keep telling her that someone has to care for the dog. we had friends that went away to ireland and left their cattle dog mmix and dobe to us to feed. we went ovet he first day and the dobe had almost starved to death. we looked at the food theyd given us. it has 12 cans (for 2 weeks for 2 dogs) of home brand dog food and home brand biscuits. i was so appaled.

    we were ment to give them half a can and 1 cup biscuits every day. we gave them a whole can and 2 cups biscuits because we were so scared of this dobe dying. mum must have spent $150 buying fresh meat and such and feeding it to them. by the time the family got home. the dobe was healthy and fit again. their claims that she was "naturally skinny" seemed wrong now.

    the family got home, opened the gate and said "oh, i'd expeected her to be dead" then both dogs got out and ran away (they arn't trained) we managed to keep them in the yard for 14 days. they get back and let them out straight awya.
    they didnt go looking for them or anything, eventually we ended up looking for their dogs. the other family just didnt care. i dont userstand that. our dogs are our family. not just our pets.
     
  14. cindr

    cindr Guest

    It seems as though your freind and family are in denial. They love the dog they hate the dog. I look at this situation as a disfuntional family. So as I see it is this. When they decide to take and do something with the dog then open the doors. Right now they are just playing head games with you and the dog too.

    The last thing you want to do is start lieng that brings you too thier level. If the dog is not getting abused then the way I look at it is this it is their dog to take care of and deal with. Step back and see what happens. Remember the more you pressure your freind the more she is going to play head games with you. Its just drama. Things will turn around shortly you wait and see.
     
  15. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest




    I don't think things are going to just "turn around" by themselves. She told me tha the dog will take a ball, roll it down the stairs, go get it, and then do the whole process over again. Its bored! this has been going on for three years. when will it end/ whe the dog's put down because it hurt her beloved cat? she loves the cat more than she loves the dog. to her the dogs a problem. they named the dog Cuddles when it was little and flufflyand cute. Now that it's not like that anymore and is destructive she doesn't like it. she likes them in their puppy stage.
     
  16. sam

    sam New Member

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    Just had a thought--what if you tell them that because she is a purebred aussie, that there will definetly be people lining up through aussie rescue to take her. In my province that's actually pretty true. The tough placements are the "special needs" aussies that are deaf, old or have other illness or issues that have arisen through being in a home not savvy about herding dogs ie biting kids, stranger fear d/t lack of socialization, neurotic behaviors d/t never leaving the yard etc
    You could make the conatct with the rescue,offer to transport the dog there etc You can make an aussie savvy home sounds great ie the dog will be able to use it's natural herding instincts, get lots of much needed stimulation etc
     
  17. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    I was offering to take the dog to the rescue, home that it would go to, or keep it until the rescue to found a home. i don't think they will give it to a rescue willingly. maybe she thinks it's like a shelter where if they don't find it a home in a certain period of time it gets put down? Maybe she thinks they won't find a home for it because it is such a nusiance to them? I printed off info on second Time Around Aussie Rescue inc. to give to her tomorrow. What are some others round Indiana and kentucky?
     
  18. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    I just showed her a picture of what her dog should be doing. I told her it would make her dog calmer and not as destructive. isaid i saw a difference when i take him to this obedience class.She sat there shaking her head no. There's no hope.:(
     
  19. Purdue#1

    Purdue#1 Guest

    How do i teach her this? Today i was talking to her about her dog, and she told me flat out that it wasn't her dog(it was her dog when it was a fuzzy puppy.). it is her sister's dog. I keep telling her and telling her that "her" dog can do obedience and agility. She says that they tell her sister to play with her dog, but she doesn't. I tell her that she needs to then. "it's not my dog to take care of," she says. When you take a dog into your family it becomes the family's dog. not just your sister's.
    They also have two other dogs that they put outside because 1 got to big and the other started to have a bad body odor. I was talking to her about me maybe training it with my new pup, ( and maybe my mom will change her mind about keeping it once she sees how sweet the dog really is;) ). Since the dog is 2 or 3 years old it should start slowing down. She says that she bites and that she can't be trained. I said that we can fix that. Training always works. Cuddles will have to release that energy she has stored up first.

    The dog so far has started chasing the cats to get rid of its energy. No one even goes outside with this dog to play with it. They expect it to find its own way to play, which it has.

    Cuddles also has separation anxiety really bad. She chewed a hole in the wall that with 2-3 inches she would have been outside. that's when they put her in the crate. That just caused her to store up more energy. She tore through the crate bottom and tore up their floor.

    i know that she will be a cuddly dog "again" if she had the right owner with the right attitude.
     
  20. casablanca1

    casablanca1 Happy

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    Give her the info and then back off. It drives you crazy, I understand, but it sounds like the more you push her, the more stubborn she gets. Leave it alone for a couple of months, and then feel her out again. Keep giving her opportunities to change her mind, but the only way to help the dog is to quit leaning on the owner so hard, since it's just making her resistant. In the meantime, the dog isn't in that bad shape - it's bored and destructive, but those aren't terminal conditions, as anyone who's lived through high school can tell you. If you're very, very concerned that the dog's miserable, offer to exercise it yourself. I know that's not fair, but that's the best you're going to be able to do for the moment.
     

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