Val bit me!

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by Val_theAussie, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. Maxy24

    Maxy24 Active Member

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    I'm glad the pup is staying with you and that you start training soon. Even if you learn nothing from training class, IMO the socializing is worth every minute. I'm sure Val will grow into a wonderful dog with an owner like you his is willing to look into what is best for him. Keep us updated! and tell us how class goes. Remember that if you are uncomfortable with what they tell you to do in class there are always other classes and other trainers, never do something you are uncomfortable with because you think you HAVE to or the trainer acts like he is holier than thou and calls you a weak leader, believe me it happens.

    Keep us updated, remember to stick with the desensitizing, I think if every puppy owner would take a small portion of time everyday to touch their pup in "unnecessary" places (feet, open mouth, look in ears, check pulse in inner thigh, felt belly, gave a hug etc.) just once or twice a day without force but just in the course of a cuddle time so that it's pleasant, many bites could be avoided (and your vet would be thankful!). People never touch a dog's feet except to cut their nails, they get their ears looked in once a year, belly felt once a year and only get hugged when a kid comes up and gives them a squeeze. If a dog does not regularly experience these things he considers them a threat, it's a safety technique for wild animals that still exists in domestic animals: Unknown=dangerous. So your best defense is to make less and less things unknown to your dog.

    Yes yelping works on some dogs and makes things worse for others. I found it worked WONDERFULLY on a Chow mix at the shelter but horribly with a Schnauzer mix puppy that my friend owned.

    Bite inhibition is a great thing, like antipunt said. It is why I recommend people don't stop their dogs from mouthing right off. they let the pup mouth gently and stop the pup as soon as he adds pressure, this way the dog actually learns how to calibrate his jaw strength to what people can handle. he gains the information for how much bite pressure human flesh needs for a warning bite vs. a serious bite with intent to harm/kill. If you don't do this the dog must use the only bite information he has and that is how hard a dog can be bitten for a warning bite. A dog can be bitten a lot harder than a human and come out unscathed. A warning bite to another dog, when used on a human, can make a person bleed. So a dog who never learns what human skin can handle will be clueless as to how hard to bite if he ever feels he MUST bite (he is afraid he will be hurt/killed and must save himself) and will use a dog to dog warning bite on you (and if he's unsocialized to dogs/taken from litter mates too early he will give an utterly clueless bite, using no knowledge of any sort of bite inhibition even to other dogs) which may break the skin or at least cause bruising. if the dog did learn what human's can handle he will know how to bite you without causing damage (unless he intended to which usually only happens if the dog has some sort of psychological issue or is truly aggressive (temperament flaw), not just reacting out of fear/reflex) just enough to tell you to back off NOW.

    Hopefully that made sense :rolleyes: I kind of just spewed it out.


    Antipunt I'm glad things are going so much better with your pup, I remember you were having some troubles with the biting, it's great to hear that things are working and Wanta is growing up into a well mannered pup.
     
  2. Val_theAussie

    Val_theAussie New Member

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    Thanks so much. I've been sent some different websites on Aussie behavior by an Aussie group and have brushing up with loads of reading, since I've apparently forgotten some puppy basics after taking care of an oldster for quite some time. (RIP Mathilda).
     
  3. Val_theAussie

    Val_theAussie New Member

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    Your "stream of consciousness" made perfect sense and I will be giving updates on how the puppy classes go. Val needs to be out and about and seeing other dogs and pupsters. A Lab passed us by tonite and he was so excited and wanted to play with the Lab. The Lab was very friendly to Val, but due to the rain and puddles and messey weather everywhere, we promised to play sometime at a later date.
     
  4. Lizmo

    Lizmo Water Junkie

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    Yes, there is no doubt why they call them "bitches"

    I agree. Herding breeds -especially Border collies, and since Aussies and collies are alot alike- need firm, but fair handling. Thats one thing I had to learn with Blaze. I can be firm, but if I wasn't fair, he didn't want to work with me.

    Blaze was also very mouthy on stock when he was a younger pup. I felt bad for the poor sheep! Haha. But with some correction, he was not dripping anymore.


    I'm glad you decided this. Val is a 4 month old puppy. Thats very, very young. :) And way too young to be considering rehoming back to the breeders because of one puppy bite.
     
  5. antipunt1

    antipunt1 New Member

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    -much- thx to this forum. (and of course the books you recommended me; they were fantastic) :popcorn:
     
  6. colliewog

    colliewog Collies&Terriers, Oh My!

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    I would guess this is geared towards out of control play-biting, not aggressive biting. But I didn't read the link, so I could be wrong ...
     
  7. Val_theAussie

    Val_theAussie New Member

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    We all had a good day today and Val is doing fine!! Just have to be careful with him and those "barracuda" teethies.
     
  8. antipunt1

    antipunt1 New Member

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    ^Someone once told me on this forum:

    "Puppies are like little sharks..."

    It opened my eyes to things >__>
     
  9. Val_theAussie

    Val_theAussie New Member

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    Val is sleeping at my feet........like a little angel dog.....the weather is great...the yard is without puddles (gonna get a french drain or sumthin' put in soon, as we have drainage trouble in our yard), and Val had a great time playing and exercising this morning like an Aussie needs so much.

    Old Mathilda (RIP) would have loved this puppy so......
     
  10. jasmom87

    jasmom87 New Member

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    I just read this thread, and through great advise received here and on my ESS thread, Maddie was a terrible mouther until just recently. She is 6 months old, and did draw blood on my hands and arms from not getting it. Her mouthing is so much gentler today, and she has not hurt me for a few months. I am naturally more afraid of dogs, and with alot of training, she is finally getting it. Just hang in there, I'm sure it was an accident. Maddie would have been gone many times over for drawing blood. She really had the razor teeth.
     

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