Training age

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Zandro, Apr 27, 2010.

  1. Zandro

    Zandro New Member

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    How old must a puppy be before you can begin teaching him commands like "sit" or "stay"? When they're very young they just want to follow you around all the time and I was wondering at what age they have developed enough so that one can start teaching them certain commands.
     
  2. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    I think 8 weeks is fine for a breeder to start working on things like "sit" with a puppy, and of course training them to be a good housepet. And as soon as someone brings a dog home at 8,10,or 12 weeks training can begin.

    I'm not sure if there are any downsides to training a younger puppy, they don't have the attention span or focus needed to actually learn commands, but I'm not sure if it's harmful.
     
  3. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    They can start learning at 4 weeks. So, as soon as you bring them home, training can begin. :D Keep the sessions short and fun.

    Stays, I usually wait until about 4-6 months.
     
  4. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    As soon as their eyes are open they can start training. If they're at the age where they're following you all the time, that's the best time to teach them to walk nicely on a leash.... they're going to do it anyway so just reward them for it; as long as you keep practicing as they grow up, they should remember that behavior into adulthood!

    Remember too, that all puppies love to be with you when they're really young. So things like recalls, leash walking, getting their attention, etc. is very easy when they're young. This doesn't mean that it will be easy when they grow up! So take advantage of this "puppyness" and reward your dog for doing those behaviors so that he'll keep doing them when he grows up.

    I do agree with CP that there are some behaviors that I'd wait to teach.... behaviors that take a longer attention span or more self control, neither of which puppies have. It will probably just frustrate you and your puppy if you work on these things before he is mentally old enough to do them.
     
  5. colliewog

    colliewog Collies&Terriers, Oh My!

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    I start training my puppies at around 3-4 weeks (sit and come mostly, as well as collar intro) so they are easier to handle and get a jumpstart in their new homes.
     
  6. RawFedDogs

    RawFedDogs New Member

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    When I was a professional trainer, I trained many 8 week old puppies. I would teach them the normal sit, down, come, and even stay. Getting attention at that age is so very easy. Keeping it for more than 10 seconds is very very difficult. :)

    Every minute you spend with a puppy is a training minute. Either you are training it or it is training you.
     
  7. Maura

    Maura New Member

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    Besides the basic sit and come, puppies are ready to learn basic house manners. Certainly pottying outside, but also to sit at the door before going out, keeping off the furniture (or which furniture they are allowed on), being comfortable in the crate, what they are allowed to chew on, their name, that a pat on the leg means to follow you, to wait at the top of the stairs until you call them down, and so on.
     

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