Training a deaf dog.

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by boo1, Nov 21, 2004.

  1. boo1

    boo1 New Member

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    Hello Everyone, I have just got a Australian caddle dog, and she is deaf. She was found beside the road where it looked as though someone had just dumped her out, probably because of her hearing. She is still young, in the chewing stage and chews up her pan we were putting her food in. She also will turn over her water. I don't know exactly how to handle these things, but I would like to train her in the basic commands, sit, stay, etc. My question is HOW?? Her being deaf has me confused as to how to teach a deaf dog. I can't put her back out, she may get hit by a car she didn't even hear coming, and the humane society probably couldn't adopt her out. Please, if anyone has any answers, any at all, please let me know. She is a very intelligent dog, and really sweet.
    Thank-you,
    boo1 :confused:
     
  2. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Good on you for adopting her! We adopted a blind Australian Shepherd many years ago, and he was one of the most wonderful creatures I've ever known. He was definitely the bravest dog I've ever seen in my life - and one of the smartest.

    We've got a couple of members with deaf dogs; I'll see if I can recruit them to sign onto the forum and share their experience with you. Here's a link to a forum (or is it "furum" in our case? ;) ) that might be helpful to you: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/deafdogs

    You might want to go ahead and get some HEAVY stoneware dog dishes that won't be so easy to flip over. Bimmer did that when he was a puppy. He'd flip the water out of the dish, then lay in it and get his belly good and wet. Now that he's grown, he doesnt' do it anymore, although if he's going hunting, he will find either a mud puddle and lay in it to mask his scent, or will lay in the pool and then in the dirt.

    Keep us posted on her progress - and post some photos in the Members' Gallery - please!
     
  3. boo1

    boo1 New Member

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    Thank-You for your information, Renee 750il, and for the link you sent. I'd love to post some pictures, but my son has the camera. The next time he's down, I'll ask him to take a few pictures for us. Sheeba is so pretty and smart, I can not see how someone just "dumped" her out. Hope you can get your friends to lend me a hand in the training, as I'm no pro anyway, ha. You have made me feel so much better by adopting her, as most everyone doesn't understand why anyone would want a deaf dog. Thank- You so much, you'll never know how your post has lifted my spirits and made me feel so much better. God bless you and yours. boo1
     
  4. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    I may have to learn a few tricks about dealing with deaf dogs myself, as Kharma is a teenager right now and acts like she can't hear me when she doesn't want to! :rolleyes:

    I just don't understand why it's even an issue about why you would or would not want a deaf dog with anyone. In the first place, it's your call, and you're obviously a much more loving, caring, responsible and humane person than someone who would turn away a puppy just because it was deaf. Maybe you should ask them what they would do if one of their children suddenly lost their hearing!
     
  5. torizmojo

    torizmojo New Member

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    Sorry for the late reply, I don't get online too often. :)

    My name is Moni and I am on my 4th deaf dog, Ol'gyrl. She is approximately 12yrs old and probably deaf due to old age. I'm not sure how much I'm going to teach her, but she's already getting the jist of some things. She was dropped off on the farm about a week ago. :( I also currently have 5 other dogs:

    Ol'gyrl-12yr+ deaf labX,
    Mojo-8yr aussie,
    Faust-6yr GSD,
    Zeo-3yr BC/Sheltie,
    Kida-2yr deaf mini aussie,
    Tenchi-18mo deaf great dane,
    & Zephyr-blind/deaf aussie, forever in our hearts

    The best site for information is the above mentioned and also here:
    http://www.deafdogs.org

    The most important thing to remember is that your dog is an individual first, it's breed second and deaf third. Don't worry about not being a pro. :) There will be a lot of trial and error, I myself learned on my ZephyrAngel, who was BOTH deaf AND blind. He learned 10+ different touch commands in his short, short life.
    ***********************************
    Here are some good basics-
    Write down what you want to use for a sign BEFORE you start teaching it so that you and other people can remember it and use it correctly.

    Interupt, Redirect & Praise is a motto for ALL training. Distract from bad behavior and praise the good.

    Ubilical training combined with crate training is a excellent way to speed up housebreaking, bonding & puppy manners. (Umbilical training is having the puppy on a long line either tied to you, or tethered in your sight when not crated)

    Try whenever possible to get the puppy to perform its behavior at LEAST 3 times before introducing a sign command(ie sit, down, stay.. etc. This does not refer to NO, DROP, Potty or like commands)

    Most deaf dogs don't actually startle, or even if they do, don't snap or growl. If you want to be extra careful that yours isn't one of the few who do, start conditioning your dog by gently waking it and immediately giving it a lucious treat. Do this often throughout the day for as long as it takes. Soon you'll have a dog waking up with wiggles and wags.
    *********************************************
    Those are all that I can think of right now. If you have any questions, feel free to write me at torizmojo@yahoo.com . I apologise in advance for any tardiness in my replies. With 6dogs, 2 kids and a job time can be scattered. :) Take care and best of luck with your new addition!

    Moni~
    Pictures of my gang can be seen at
    http://f1.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/torizmojo/my_photos

    & also here
    http://torizmojo.textamerica.com
     
  6. Millie

    Millie New Member

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    A friend of mine has a deaf Dalmation. She uses hand comands. They did put in under ground fencing just to make sure she stays in the yard. She does have a problem with nipping at people she doesn't know. I don't know if its because she is deaf that she bites. They have a sign up beware of dog she is deaf. Thats so people know what they are dealing with. Good luck with your new dog.
     
  7. candy722

    candy722 New Member

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    Even if their deaf you could still train your dog. My dog is not deaf and he doesn't seem to understand vocal commands. He usually looks at my hand commands. It's funny because I don't have to say anything and I just flip my hand upside down then he plays dead. It's cute. I guess you gotta find a way to show hand gestures that your dog is doing something wrong. Good Luck!
     

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