Tips on training a puppy Doberman

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by zaidoo, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    and with some pictures to show you guys with a mean face and some pictures to scare you :D
     
  2. GSDlover_4ever

    GSDlover_4ever New Member

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    I too, like to have a real DOG. I dont like punk-ass dogs who will run away. However, I like my dogs to be able to analyze a situation and not go straight into defense. That will turn into a lawsuit. Caza (my GSD) is very protective but never outright attacks. He just watches trying to figure out whats happening. Like if someone is running up to me in an agressive way (or as he sees it) he just stands in front of me to make his presence known, but until he knows that they are a direct threat to me he will not do anything but watch (and maybe a slight grumble). You dont want a dog always in defense because that would make them unstable and unpredictable.
     
  3. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    Yes I've understood and learned from all you guys that such dogs don't need training to be agressive as they will naturally act solidly on some unwanted situation but I still believe that there is nothing wrong if you make your dog intelligent and friendly yet a bit more classy in this sense when it was common in the old days on the boards (Bewars of the dogs) You know my point! My intention is very simple just to let the people know that I have a Lion Hearted Dog in my house a friendly lion who will not allow any stone unturned!
     
  4. elle

    elle New Member

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    And I think that you're missing the point of many here --

    If you *try* to teach a dog to be "aggressive" or "lion-hearted" in the manner you are talking about, you will end up with an unstable dog. One who is NOT brave, solid, and loyal -- but unpredictable. One who will not be able to tell a real threat from normal things and might bite you or a family member with little provocation. One who is lacking confidence and discrimination. One who will more likely end up biting a family member (likely a child) over a misunderstand rather than defending against strangers.

    If you want your dog to be "lion-hearted" you need to train it properly - which means NOT egging it on to be aggressive. To get the dog with the attitude you want, you will need to spend many hours working with your dog and you will absolutely have to take it to dog obedience classes.

    By doing obedience with a good trainer in a class setting, your dog learns how to communicate with you. The dog learns to trust you and you build a bond with the dog. The dog also builds self-confidence because he knows what you are asking and how to give it to you. It is this type of PROPERLY trained dog that will provide a "presence" in your house. It is this type of dog that will naturally want to protect you and have the confidence to hold his own around strangers.

    A dog who is trained in the manner you are talking about (no classes, encouraged to be "aggressive" but not loving with the owner) will not develop this confidence and could likely be terrified of strangers and unpredictable around family.
     
  5. elle

    elle New Member

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    to make your dog more "classy" he will need formal obedience training. it is then that he will develop the bond with you that is necessary for him to act in the way you are describing.

    if you try to do this on your own, you will end up with one confused, unstable dog. you will not be predictable to him. he will become withdrawn and cowardly. if you try to push him to be agressive, he may become fearful of people and rather than being the proud, gaurd that intimidates strangers, he may crouch down and pee on the floor when people come to your house.
     
  6. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    Thank You! Tell me a bit more about dog's obedience classes!
     
  7. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    My mom has already chosen the name of the dog I will buy; haha. The dog will be called, "Dan" It looks a good name for a brave dog. The problem remains that we are not sure which dog we want to buy. Although he will be my dog but my mom wants a doberman and my father wants a German Shepherd. We all want a brave and intelligent dogs You guys recommended other dogs to look at but I really don't like or get excited for any other dog apart from these 2. They seems to be the best dogs with "5 star qualities" written over them.

    I was thinking that Doberman would be better off to stay in my room as he will shed less and also can take few naps on my bed. :D
     
  8. silverpawz

    silverpawz No Sugar Added

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    I'm wondering what will happen if you buy a puppy and it grows up to be a submissive sweetie instead of a 'brave' dog? Will he still have home with you regardless?

    Training a dog to be aggressive is not the way to go. A well trained, obedient dog will scare off most shady people without ever needing to become aggressive. Just the fact that you have control over your dog will make folks wonder what else he's capable of.

    My three dogs are Collies and I still have folks cross the street when I walk them together. Obedient dogs are ones that few 'shady' folks would try to mess with, no matter what the breed.
     
  9. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    I can attest to that. My Doberman rarely barks or shows much reactiveness at all. He mostly just watches intently, ears up, standing straight. Just the fact that he's a Doberman is enough to make people who don't know him think twice about getting out of their car. They usually wait for me. It's their reputation and the less information the dog gives off, the more questionable things about the dog are to strangers. He's not aggressive, but they don't know that.

    People that know me, get out of their car and he's just fine. That's the way I like it.
     
  10. elle

    elle New Member

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    I would suggest finding both GSD and Doberman rescues in your area if you are serious about doing this the right way. Contact both rescues, go meet the dogs, and see which "clicks" with you. Nobody here can tell you which breed will suit you better, you have to make that call.

    If you find a good rescue, they will often also be able to point you in the direction of a good trainer in the area. In the meantime, if you're interested in learning more about training check out: http://www.leerburg.com for some ideas. Maybe get some of their DVDs to watch and learn from.

    I would strongly suggest you go for a rescue dog. Both Dobermans and GSDs change a lot between the time they are small puppies and adults. Even to very experienced people in the breed it is often hard to tell what "personality" the dog will mature into. Since you're looking for very specific qualities in a dog, a rescue will likely be able to match you with an adult that has those qualities. They are experienced in the breed and know the dogs they have available and will be able to match you with one who will suit you. If you buy a puppy, even with a good breeder, you are taking the risk that the dog you buy will grow up to lack the qualities you are looking for.
     
  11. doberkim

    doberkim Naturally Natural

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    In addition, no dog is going to want, or be able to, stay in just your room. Dobes need exercise, as to GSD's. No puppy can stay crated for 20 hours a day and only be out for the 3 hours you have to devote to the dog.
     

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