Tips on training a puppy Doberman

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by zaidoo, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    Dobermaniacs! Share and let me know what is a good way to train a Doberman puppy and how to make it confident; playful; friendly; agressive and dangerous when required? and share your useful tips. Thanks
     
  2. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Do you already have a puppy? Or are you thinking of getting one? Is this your first dog ever? What made you decide on this breed, if you don't mind my asking?

    Tips:
    Socialize, socialize, socialize. Think and write a list of everything you might ever want your dog to feel confident about and expose him, making sure everything is pleasurable and not frightening. Every single day, get that pup out amongs all kinds of people; adults, men, women, children, (children 2-4 yrs, children between 4-8, children between 8-18) different colors, different clothing, hats, umbrellas, vet's office a couple times a week for a weight, cookie and pat, clipping nails, baths, having strangers "examine" him, pat him all over...different environments, ground surfaces, crowds of people, small numbers of people, machinery, traffic, car rides, other animals, including dogs and more.

    Obedience puppy class is wonderful if you find a reputable trainer who uses motivation and reward training methods as opposed to yanking a dog by his collar and harshness. Dobermans, especially can be very, very sensative and can be ruined by heavy handedness.

    Teach him that you are to be trusted explicitly, never be harsh, but teach him the rules. Be consistant and make training sessions fun. Obedience training is a must. You can start right away with basic stuff; sit, come, down, stay. Motivate and reward. Make very short sessions when he's a baby....5 minutes a couple times a day, lots of romping and running...not so excessive that it's too much for his joints.

    I'd recommend some books before you get your pup, if you haven't already and even if you have already. Culture Clash, by Jean Donaldson, Don't Shoot the Dog by Karen Pryor, The Power of Positive Training, Pat Miller. Those are absolutely invaluable. I wish I read them a long time ago. Please don't get into the Cesar Milan intimidation/domination stuff. That can really take the drive out of a dog. And a good Doberman needs some drive. Any dog needs drive. But if you don't want a chicken hearted Dobe, don't use all that force and intimidation. IMO. They sure do need rules and they need to learn to be obedient, but that comes from educating them, not pushing them around.

    You do not teach a Doberman to be protective. If they're going to be, they will be with ample socialization and obedience training. And most of all, from having a good, bonding relationship with their family. They must be with their family most of the time, not left alone outside. Some have it more than others. But a shy, fearful, unsocialized Doberman is a disaster. A well socialized, well trained, well bred Doberman is a wonderful breed, but they take a tremendous amount of work. They need oodles of exercise and they have endless energy as youngsters. You have to go out and meet people every day....a lot of work. But an undersocialized Doberman will not learn what is normal to be able to compare to what is not normal, therefore will not reconize the difference between the good guys and the bad.

    Again.....they have been breeding them to be more mellow than in the old days. Some are more protective than others. Some are of poor temperament. It's really important to be careful when selecting and to learn all you can first. And to have the righ reasons for choosing a breed such as this.

    Let us know what you're plans are....if you haven't gotten a pup yet, let us help you, if you need it regarding how to find a good breeder, what to watch for etc. If you just want a dog to be aggressive, dangerous...that's a scary thought. If you need protection really badly, there are better ways.

    Look up on Google, the DPCA website. (Doberman Pinscher Club of America) There will be more info there...a good place to start.
     
  3. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    Thanks a lot for your keen interest in helping me with the dog stuff. No I don't have a puppy yet but I'm planning on buying one real soon. I had dogs when I was very young about two dogs; one was very small and the other one was a big white cute dog; he was not so intimidating though. My father would take him for hunting.

    What made me select this breed? Well I didn't do any research and I only know about a few breeds like Doberman; German Shepherd; bulldogs; greyhounds that comes to my mind. Why a doberman? Well my girl friend thinks they are stylish; haha; secondly I like the fact that they are intimidating. When I see them with someone on a walk or somewhere I get so terrified. Well I want a dog to be a DOG; you know not a sissy or a show piece dog. So my mind just appeals to them and think they should be a good choice, I want a dog to be loyal and should know what is right and wrong; should be friendly but should know when soemthing isn't right. I don't want a protection but I want a dog to have some balls you know? Now some say German Shephed also fits good on what I want and some tells me about Doberman; but why I think I'll go for Doberman is because of their looks; intimidation factor; and they shed less hair; haha. Now you have to tell me which dog I should choose because you know better and seems to be a Dobby Pro! Thank you!
     
  4. RD

    RD Are you dead yet?

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    Sounds like you basically want a perfect dog . . . Dobermans, like all dogs, can't distinguish "right from wrong" without being taught to do so. Dogs aren't born with a set of human morals.
    Why are you so keen on having a dog that looks stylish and intimidates people (and don't the two clash a bit . . .)? The great thing about the Doberman is that people often don't know they are protective until the dog really needs to be. Most Dobes that I meet enjoy attention from strangers and can be friendly and social while still being watchful and alert.

    I loooove Dobermans but if you just want a dog that will look intimidating and be perfect otherwise, I would just get a gun and keep it where people can see. Dobermans are very active, very intelligent and though I've never lived with one, I am sure that they can be quite trying at times. You really have to want the dog as a friend and companion, because they want to be so much more than a fashion statement.

    There are quite a few Dobe owners here and combined, they have LOADS of info. I'm sure they will be of more help to you . . . good luck!
     
  5. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    RD made some great points. No dog knows right from wrong the way we do. T

    hey are VERY trying as puppies, high energy. They make you want to pull your hair out and go climb a tree and escape. They are not easy puppies. They're pushy and persistant. They don't give up easily. Please do your research, lots of it before you get into this. They are not a dog for everyone. Some people are obsessed with dogs and want to do everything with their dog, want the dog with them all the time, love training and working on things with them a lot and just be very involved. That's what it takes with a Doberman. Some people like the companionship of a dog and like having them around when they have time for them, but don't have oodles of time to spend with a dog. This breed is not for that kind of person. All dogs, especially puppies take a lot of time and work, good training but not all dogs require the intense time a Doberman does.

    Their temperaments also vary quite a bit. Some are friendly to strangers, but most are more on the aloof side. They actually should be. They don't all have "balls." Some are real marshmellows. They're highly playful and goofy, getting into mischief and slow to mature. It is imperative to go to a reputable breeder. Find out how to find a reputable breeder. Don't go by websites. A lot of websites look great and they're lousy breeders. Always start with the best you can find, bred for good temperament, sound bodies, good health. Dobes have a ton of potential health problems in many lines, in some cases, in all lines....big time. Research that.

    Start here and do some serious soul searching and decide if your reasons for wanting a dog in general and a particular breed specifically are the "right" reasons. A dog is a living, thinking creature who needs us. They're dependent on us like children are. It's a major commitment when getting a dog and puppies are tremendously trying and take some know how. Learn all you can first before jumping into it. You really have to like to read and talk to people a lot. LOL. I spent over a year researching the Doberman breed and another year looking for just the right breeder who would be having pups. I spent extra time learning more about training and behavior. In fact that is continuing all the time. Responsible breeders don't all have pups at the drop of a hat. You normally have to wait a long time. In fact, this is good that you're seeking information. Kudos to you for that. It will save you a lot of heart ache down the road.
    Start with this and let us know what you think.

    This is something I wrote after loads of study and I think it will give you an idea of how dogs think and learn....a start, anyhow. It's long but figure on reading a lot for a while. It really will help you a lot. (there are also stickies here and in the puppy forum...the top threads with little thumb tacs. Some of those might be helpful.)

    http://www.chazhound.com/forums/sho...nthropomorphizing+dogs+dog+human+relationshps

    This is the Doberman Pinscher Club site....lots of good info. Check out the all the links.
    http://www.dpca.org/
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2006
  6. SummerRiot

    SummerRiot Dog Show Addict

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    I'm just going to elaborate on the "right from wrong" factor.

    I own a Belgian Tervuren male.

    Now, hes indimidating in himself - BUT I did NOT get him for that aspect. I got Riot because I wanted a loyal, intelligent, quick thinking/acting, willing working dog. I also wanted a dog that i could show - No hes not the "
    " type of dog at all - yet he does well in it.

    At 9 months of age he recieved his Novice Rally Title. He came from working and show lines (as all belgians should).

    BUT he went through a horrible puppy stage where he didn't know right from wrong and automatically went into defensive/aggresive mode when a stranger would approach him or I. He lunged at our conformation instructor, growled at friends and basically scared anyone away. EVEn with consistant socializing he was like that from 6 months of age until he was about 9.5 months old. He didn't know "the right time" to be protective because he was "always on" as a pup. It took consistant work with trainers and Belgian handlers and I. Now he'll give strangers kisses, allow kids to pet him and most recently has recieved his Canine Good Neighbour title(hUGE breakthrough).

    Now, hes been in Search and Rescue training, Obedience work for his CD, Agility training, RallyO Advanced and Excellent training as well as continuale Conformation training.
    Dogs take work - and LOTS of it.

    If you are thinking of a Doberman as a breed -be prepared to put LOTS of WORK into your dog. I've met a few Dobes and spoken to Dobe owners/breeders at shows about them and have heard from them they need TONS of PROPER socializing and early training to be a Good Dog.
    I have even had the opertunity to meet a Protection trained Guard Doberman that used to work in a Prison. Even he needed to be taught right from wrong - LOTS LOTS LOTS of work for that one.

    No dog comes with a natural "right from wrong" instinct in the human world. We need to curve their minds as to what is acceptable behaviour and what is not.

    I suggest before purchasing your puppy. Look into Doberman lines - Some Dobes come from aggresion lines, therefore bringing aggresion issues to their offspring. Go to dog shows, speak to ALL the doberman owners you can find about their dogs, training and socializing their dog recieved.
    That is the ONLY WAY of getting a sound and SANE puppy to start off with.

    Only the ones with stable temperment will do what you'd like.
     
  7. Jynx

    Jynx New Member

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    posters to this thread might want to read this initial post
    http://www.chazhound.com/forums/showthread.php?t=34107

    The more I read, I'm sorry, the more the mindset of the OP, bothers me.
    The reasons you are now stating for wanting a dog, are not a good reason in my book.

    I'm sorry again, but you make it sound like you want a dog as a "status symbol".. You want "intimidating", "aggressive", etc. yet you've never owned either a gsd or a dobie, Guess you wouldn't be interested in say, a maltese eh?

    Just my opinion
    Diane
     
  8. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    Doberluv,
    I've decided I'll get a Doberman as I've taken it as a challenge and previlage to own a doberman and what more than to have you as my mentor to help me in every step. Now few questions and you tell me what is the right choice for me. Should I buy a Doberman Puppy or should I buy an adult dog? How old in either case? Can I take a Doberman in my room? Can I take a nap with a doberman and wake up alive in one piece? What about the food? Can I be active and acrobatic on my own being with a Doberman?

    If I leave the dog in my home on the outerside; let's say he'll be open to roam in the garden and all areas outside the main rooms of the house but ofcourse within the main outer gate of the house; leaving him to roam around at night or should I make a little home at one side if he wants to relax? Will it be ok to occassionaly take him inside the room as I can not do it regularly. Summing up I have a house with a small garden and has an exterior outer path across the inner rooms of the house. It's about 150 to 200 meters of free space for the dog and ofcourse he'll go with me for exercise and walk daily and yes a female would be better or a male if I intend to keep only 1 dog? Thanks!
     
  9. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    If I haven't owned a Dobby there has to be a start? and I want intimidating; agressive in this sense that he does show that side if requied which I hope not. Not that someone comes and slaps me and the Dobby would stand and watch; atleast he should see me and we should have a mutual decison to make over there. You see!
     
  10. Julie

    Julie Are You Blowing Me Off?

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    zaidoo,
    I think you should rethink your breed choice...... Dobermans need more time than you have to spend on one.
    They are a very demanding breed. :)

    Will your doberman be kept outside? That is how it seems.
    If so, that should not be an option for a doberman.
    And a doberman can shed quite alot. Even though the hair is short.

    Several things about your statements on this thread and the one posted above really concern me.

    And no you don't have to start........yet. Maybe when you are able to work less hours or take your dog with you, Maybe when you decide you don't want intimidating and aggressive when you live with a four year old, older family members and a maid. Maybe when you don't want the dog to live in your courtyard, but inside with a family for proper socialization, so you don't have a fear aggressive or attention getting explosive dog.

    Just my take on the matter, but I am sure you will follow thru with your decision anyway. I just hope you socialize the heck out of that dog and teach the dog that all the people in the household are "pack leaders" not just you.

    One more thing....... It is YOUR responsibility to protect your dog from harm... not the other way around. :)
     
  11. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    I'm concerned with the reasons too, although they may change with some research and help. You may decide this isn't the breed for you, if you look at everything and be honest with yourself. Or, you may decide that yes, this does sound like a great breed for you and you can learn first and do things right. If you are honest with yourself and really look at all the angles, not just the surface ones, (cool looking, tough etc) you will probably do the right thing for yourself. Spend the time researching first. Don't rush into a decision that can cost you huge heartache down the road and hurt another living and innocent being.

    Dobermans are not like a lot of breeds. They're perky, high energy and demanding. And most Doberman experts advise not getting one as your first dog. Now, I know you said you had a couple dogs when you were young. But have you had the practice in training a dog as an adult? As an adult, I would recommend starting with an easier breed. And if you do get a Doberman, a female is easier than a male. (in general) An older rescue might be a better option than a pup. But be careful what they give you. Make sure they have a reputation for matching owners and dogs well. Some do not.

    Most all dogs will alert you to danger...to a prowler. It's in the canine's make-up to protect his family. My Chihuahuas make more racket than my Doberman...can hear things further away and sooner than my Doberman. It never fails. I have a .38 in my drawer and I have no need for a Doberman.

    I would hate a dog who scared people on account of his behavior. If they're worried about my Doberman, Lyric, it's on account of the breed's reputation....not much more. (except for a couple of occasions where something weird did happen and he went in front of the door and growled) But that's when I was in the shower and alone in the house. He was out in the yard and some man he didn't know came over. He was fine with him in the yard, but when he approached the front door, Lyric scooted up there, sat in front of it and gave a little, throaty growl...not a big to do, but just a little warning growl, where by the guy went further back on the path. Then when I came out, he told me all this. Then Lyric was friendly to him. But he doesn't have a problem with delivery people, nothing. He's definitely stable and not indiscriminately flying off the handle. Part of it is his temperament and part of it is his socialization and training. Without ample socialization, a dog doens't have a clue.

    He doesn't bark as much as a lot of dogs. For example, when we're all outside and someone drives up my long driveway, he doesn't bark at all. He just stands there, "duh...." He watches quietly. They can get out of their car and he just mozies on over to see them. He just watches. He's not particularily outgoing at first but not aggressive. If we're in the house, they all bark. But he doesn't bark anymore than any other dog I've ever had except for my Lab. I don't want him to scare people.

    When we're on an off leash hike in the woods and we occasionally happen on some other hikers, he minds his own business and isn't concerned with them at all. That's how I like it. They're not doing anything wrong and he knows it.

    I hike with my dogs almost every day....a little less in the hot whether. Dobes are not cut out for extreme temperatures and can over heat easily. But they need off leash, good aerobic exercise every day. You have to have a place where you can give them that. Leash walks just don't cut it for a young Doberman or any medium to large, high energy breed. You need to love lots of walking yourself. I'd have to walk from here to Miami to give him enough exercise if all I could do was keep him on a leash. We live on 5 acres so he can run around pretty darn well inbetween his real exercise.

    Besides giving them good exercise, they need brain work and lots of it. Without both of those things, their health and behavior will suffer. You need to know about the proper and effective way to train and treat your dog or you will have problems...best if you learn a bunch first, regardless of what breed you get or what age.

    Dobermans can be outside to romp and play, go to the bathroom and maybe sun themselves for a while...as long as you have a safe yard with a fence. (I don't have a fence, but I live in the mountains....in the sticks) But I tell you what, most of the time, they can't stand to not be by your side. It's hard to go in the bathroom yourself without company and not just company, but a Doberman will insist on helping you through every step of the way. They're right there like a shadow. It can be irritating to some people. This is the way they were bred. Their noses are into everything. They can't just watch you while you cook. They are sure that they should be helping you. It's their "duty." LOL. If you don't include your Doberman as part of the family, inside with you, he will not be happy and will not tend to make as good a protection dog. Anyow, as far as that goes, they really vary. Some don't have it much at all anymore. They've really mellowed them out.

    In much of their training, they are very quick at catching on and willing to try (when you rely on positive method training) but they have times where they're sure you've got it all wrong and they are going to show you a better way. If you fight them tooth and nail and get into a power struggle, you'll get nowhere fast. You have to be creative too. Heavy handedness will ruin this highly sensative dog. (some are more sensative than others)

    They are monsters as puppies....really....like they're on crack or something. Adorable and sweet, but into everything every second.

    Sure they can sleep with you and do anything any dog can do. When you have a trusting relationship and a dog who understands what you want through proper training, you have one of the most loyal, affectionate, trustworthy dogs there are. I love my Dobe. They need rules and boundaries, just like all dogs. But they have to be taught how to do those rules and boundaries. Consistancy and a good relationship are important. Maintaining trust in you is extremely important. But they must be trained in obedience and practiced every day a little bit.

    All these things I read about people having aggression problems....it makes me sad. I can stick my face right into Lyric's face and he loves it. (not natural for many dogs) His ears go flat, gets that lovey, affectionate look and just eats it up. He gives hugs and is a big marshmellow. He never looks worried or nervous with me no matter what I'm doing. We lie on the couch to watch TV and I have my legs draped over his side, as there's not much room. LOL. I've fallen on him in the night, in the dark...right on him...nothing. A stranger by accident stepped on his toe when we were at a garage sale...nothing. He knows what I mean when I say, "off" ....as in get off the couch. I never intimidated him to get off. I simply rewarded him when he did. So, he's glad to get off when I ask. If he's hogging up too much room, I tell him, "turn around" and he gets up and rearranges himself so I can fit too. LOL. That was a little trick I taught him.

    But he's taken a lot of time, exercise, oodles of socialization, training, classes, lots of patience....it's taken most of my time during the early days to help him grow and be the nice dog he is. Just like children, they need nurturing and lots of it.

    If you want a companion dog only and don't want to spend the kind of time and work it takes with a Dobe or a GSD (I've had them too) get a smaller dog who was meant to be a companion and doesn't require all that exercise and only needs a part time job. LOL. I love my little Chihuahuas too. They're adorable and sooooooo easy. So easy to go traveling with, just satisfied with so little. They're wonderful too.There are lots of smaller breeds which are lovely and medium sized ones too.

    Spend some serious time, thinking and reading.
     
  12. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Wonderful post Julie....so spot on! I didn't see yours when I wrote mine. LOL. Mine is so long, but I wanted to give a feel for what they're like.
     
  13. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    Thanks a lot Doberluv and everyone for your kind support! Ok I would listen to the more experienced dog owners/lovers and not train my dog to be aggressive but I sure would want my dog to be brave by all means. I will do all research before I finally buy a breed but tat this time I think I'll take Doberman as a challenge and show all you guys what I've done with him.

    There is a perosn who I talked to in my region. I don't know him persoannly but he's a friend of my friend. He loves all dogs and live alone with a dozen dogs and he had 2 Dobes which he kept for 5 years. He told me Dobes shouldn't be a problem if you get a puppy Dobe and train him properly. He said it's not 2 hours or 3 hours stuff that matters; he said if you give 15 minutes but do it like 20 times a day then he'll be more happy. According to him he wants more interaction than one long period in the evening. His experience said Dobes are more stable in temparament than GSP who tends to be a bit hyper at times. He said Dobes have more tendency to be a One man dog and are dangerous to children if not trained/exposed properly.
     
  14. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    I don't want a small dog; I want atleast a medium sized dog of the size of Doberman. Which other breeds can you suggest who are brave/loyal/good looking/ guard dogs that require less work than Dobes/GSP ? If you think I should start with another breed.
     
  15. Caren+Bailey

    Caren+Bailey New Member

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    I didn't buy Bailey b/c i want a Dog to be a Dog......I bought him b/c i have loved the SBT Breed from a very young age.

    However, Bailey is the friendliest most loving dog you could ever meet.........but people still cross the roads and take hold of their childrens hands if they see him coming toward them in the street.

    You don't have to teach him to have this ability, it comes naturally with certain breeds.

    I would just like to add though.......unlike you, i hate it that people are terrified of my dog.

    I think that certain breeds have a bad name and that is not fair on them!!
     
  16. Julie

    Julie Are You Blowing Me Off?

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    He will be more happy if you and your family are his contstant companion. Not 15 minutes and then outside by himself.
    The more time you spend with your dog......the more he will learn, just from everyday experiences and family life.
    You should never have structured training sessions that last 2 or 3 hours, but 15 minutes would be more like it for a pup. I think that is what your friend means.
    As for the time we are telling you it takes to have a great dog, That includes just spending time with your dog, you can do that many ways. Including the training times. You will have a much more relaxed, less excitable dog the more time you spend with him. Dogs that are kept outside alone tend to be more excitable and take more time to calm down and focus than a dog that lives in your home and has met his "attention quota"
    And a dog that is constantly by your side tends to be able to "read" their owners better , as well as the owner being able to "read" their dog better.

    I just hope you consider your expectations of a pup or dog. They seem a little to perfect.... you just never know what you could end up with.

    Are you willing to have every flower in your yard dug up or laid on?
    Not to mention bare parts of the yard where the dog runs back and forth.
    Are you willing to clean up poop?
    Are you willing to deal with chewing........ I have went thru a total of six garden hoses while my dogs were pups.
    Not to mention shoes, purses, toys, bike seats, etc.
    Rocket has bit thru about 9 bicycle tires on my sons bike, One tractor tire, Three four wheeler tires, and put holes all thru the kids tire swing, which is made out of a real car tire. Needless to say, she has a thing for tires. And she only does it when nobody is looking. I think we have it under control now, except for the kids tire swing.....

    Also if you get a dobe pup.....their ears don't come standing up. They would need surgery for that. And it seems, since you like their looks, you would want that done. Then there are weeks of care after the surgery. I am not familar with much of that, because I have never had any experience with it.

    Just trying to give you some more things to think about. As dog ownership is great......but there are trying times and it is not always a bowl of cherries.:)
     
  17. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Would you believe months? LOL. Lyric was 1 yr. old before I could stop posting his ears. Every 3-4 days, they were cleaned and changed. Everytime they got wet from rain, they'd be changed. And you have to learn how. Some people don't even want to do it themselves because if it's done wrong, they will not only not stand, but they'll bend in toward eachother over the top of the head and look like ****. So, they take them to a vet who will do it. But some vets do a lousy job. They don't all know how to do it either. It's a bit of an art all the way around, from the surgery (which the breeder should have taken care of before you even get your pup) to the aftercare. LOL.
     
  18. Julie

    Julie Are You Blowing Me Off?

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    Oh....... good information. I knew it was involved, but I didn't realize it could take a year. I also didn't know that the breeder should already have it done.
    Learn something new everyday. :)
    I bet that really adds alot more expense on a new pup.
    Thanks for the info.
     
  19. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Most reputable breeders (in the US, anyhow) will have the ears cropped by a vet, experienced in this particular art. Not very many vets do it or do it well. It should not be left up to the buyer. Fine breeders do not want their puppies, which carry their good name.... looking like crap or getting infections. Yes, it makes the dog about $200.00 +/- more than it would otherwise. That's aproximately the cost of the procedure.

    The ears should be done at around 7 or 8 weeks of age, while still with the breeder. She cares for them until they're all but healed, scabs just about gone or gone. Then all there is to do for the buyer is post. There are some terrific "lessons"/ instructions online. Plus, my breeder demonstrated for me on one of her older dogs.

    It was very scary at first when I did it. I was soooooo worried about allowing "pockets" to form. That happens when the tampon (if you're using the tampon method) doesn't get pushed down into the well of the ear firmly enough. Those pockets is what causes the ears to turn inward. Then you have to be sooo careful not to wrap too tightly or too loosely. I was a nervous wreck the first few times and had my neice hold Lyric while I did it.

    Within a week or two, I got more confident and it was a snap....took 5 minutes and Lyric also got so used to sitting nicely on my lap and holding still. It was sort of a bonding experience for us. He learned early what patience and tolerance is, how to "hold it." LOL. Sometimes he'd sleep right through it and I'd do it on the couch. LOL.

    It's just a soft tampon with some special (not too sticky) tape back-taped and then placed into the ear, wrapping the ear around it and wrapping something around that. I used paper tape for the outside and vet wrap over that, but that would have to be pre-stretched and checked often that it wasn't too snug. You can't allow the circulation to be cut off. Extreme care must be taken with that.

    Anyhow, his ears turned out great, but took a few months longer than some dogs. It depends on the ear leather and other factors.
     
  20. zaidoo

    zaidoo New Member

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    I want a Doberman and I'll buy a Dobby if not I'll buy a GSD and I'll train him the way I want and will keep you guys updated. Thank you all!
     

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