Those who bought from responsible breeders...

Discussion in 'The Fire Hydrant' started by Julee, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. sillysally

    sillysally Obey the Toad.

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    I have a different perspective on responsible breeders and health because my responsible breeder dog developed FCP elbow dysplasia. It's a chronic condition that we will deal with the rest of his life. Now I know 1827472819 people will chime in here and say " MY breeder dog is healthy and every way!" and that's fantastic, but mine isn't, so it changes the way I look at things a bit.

    Whether we get a dog from a breeder or a rescue or the shelter or Craig's list will depend on where we are in life when the time comes to get another dog. DH really doesn't care for puppies, and BADLY wants a rescued greyhound. The black lab we transported from the shelter was absolutely fantastic, and I would have taken him in a heartbeat if I could have.

    I volunteer occasionally with a rescue and am good friends with the director (who also happens to be Jack's second favorite person in the world), and would absolutely consider having her help us find a dog when the time comes.

    While both health and temperament are important, temperament is THE most important to me. You can treat health issues, but you can't really change a dog's basic temperament. I wouldn't knowingly take a dog with health issues, but if it happens it happens.

    Now it could have a lot to do with breed choice too, since there are a LOT of young labs that have outgrown the adorable puppy stage that need homes when their owners realize that they don't train themselves and won't magically calm down at a year old.

    Then again, we might go with a breeder-who knows. I guess I just want an athletic, outgoing, dog friendly, people friendly, bird and cat tolerant, kid friendly, not nervy dog, who likes to get up and do things but has an off switch (loves to fetch and swim is a plus). If I can find that in rescue, all the better as far as I'm concerned. Dog sports aren't all that important to me--they are icing on the cake as far as I'm concerned. If the dog enjoys them and can do them it's great, but if they don't or can't my heart won't be broken.

    It is my personal opinion that dog owners as a community should all participate in rescue, even in a small way (if not adopting or fostering, donating-even small amounts). No, these dogs are not YOUR responsibility, but sometimes when you are part of the community you do things to help said community--sort of a "You are responsible for what you have tamed" kind if thing.

    Sorry if this was a bit rambling-just worked 10 hours and am TIRED!
     
  2. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    I agree with this.

    One of my favorite breeders tag lines is "If you breed, you must rescue"

    That includes simple things like networking, offering transport, short term foster, donations, supplies, whatever. I do think that if one breeds they should be actively involved in some way in at least their chosen breeds rescues.
     
  3. SaraB

    SaraB New Member

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    I have adopted from rescues, fostered for rescues and bought dogs from breeders. To be honest, I'm going to go where I find the dog that best fits my needs at the time.

    I adopted Zuma because she was exactly what I was looking for.

    I bought Zinga and Zip Tie because I knew that odds are that they would turn out to be exactly what I was looking for.

    The only dog that wasn't a perfect fit was a dog bought from a breeder. However, I really didn't do my homework on the dog's lines or the breeder. So it might have been prevented if I had just spent more time studying.

    So really, I don't care where I get my dogs from. I care that they are a good fit and are what I need. And no, I don't feel guilty about that.
     
  4. BostonBanker

    BostonBanker Active Member

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    I know you caught some (mild for sure) heat for this, so I just want to say - I get it. Obviously both my dogs are rescues, and they are amazing :D People getting rescue dogs and going out and DOING stuff with them is very much my thing. I love it and it makes me beam when I see others doing it. Meg was on death row, and she has a championship title! Gusto was rescued twice before he was six weeks old and pulled out of a mattress in an abandoned trailer, and he's got people cooing over him at agility trials. And when I hear people throwing out all the negatives about rescue dogs (Ingrained behaviors! Health problems! Baggage! No socialization!) I hear them as negatives about my dogs, and I want to stand on Pride Rock and hold them out like baby Simba and scream "Do you see this amazing creature?! Someone threw this away!"

    That's only a mild exaggeration :D I really don't have a problem with breeders. Someday maybe I'll use one. Our first dog was from a good breeder, and I don't regret him a bit or feel guilty that we got him. I don't knock those who go to breeders, because what matters most is that they and their dog are happy, and if that is the answer for them, that is the right thing to do. But I do wish more people with the skills and knowledge to really make something of their dogs (in a public sense) would be willing to work with rescues. The amazing ones really are there. A lot of them don't even need more work than breeder dogs. And getting them out and showing the world and the general public that they can do anything is something I care about.
     
  5. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    I do think I will have a rescue in a few dogs down the road. Specific type of dog and when I am in a position to look long and hard for that dog and have an opening. Probably not likely to happen until after the papillons are gone though to be honest. If the papillons are ever gone... :rofl1: Not sure that will ever happen.

    I love Gusto and I love Zuma. And Webster and Kim. I know there's dogs out there that would be amazing for me to own.
     
  6. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

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    (I haven't read the entire thread.)

    Abrams was purchased from a breeder. I chose to go the breeder route for a multitude of reasons. I wanted a puppy (as I wanted to start from a clean slat and raise him how I wanted to raise him), but I wanted to "know" the characteristics that puppy was going to have as an adult dog. Not only did I want a puppy, I wanted a specific type of puppy. I wanted a dog that had as much of a chance to behave/act/look like Blackie did as I could possibly get. Not only did I want a puppy, a specific type of puppy, and specific type of dog, I wanted to make sure that when I got all of those things, I had the best chance of getting a healthy dog free from genetic defects as I possibly could under the circumstances.

    All of my prior dogs were rescues. Blackie was a stray 6 month old Lab that my family adopted. He was perfect, in both health and behavior. Rose was a rescue (in a way) and we knew both of her parents - she was a good dog and healthy up until 13 years of age, but not my cup of tea. Chloe was adopted from an "oops" litter as a puppy, and considering her situation I consider her a rescue. She has severe temperament issues and minor health issues. Cynder was an adult rescue, and she is also an awesome dog.

    I've fostered some freaking awesome dogs that I wished I had been able to keep at the time. And had I come across one of those freaking awesome dogs that I knew would be an awesome match for me before I purchased Abrams? I may have gone with that dog.

    I do not feel guilty - at all - for purchasing Abrams vs. adopting.

    I do know after my experience with Chloe, I'll likely stick to adopting older puppies/adult dogs versus baby puppies from now on. I'd like to make sure I'm getting a well tempered dog right off the bat versus one that I don't know how genetic temperament is going to screw over.
     
  7. RottenFlower

    RottenFlower rotties are my kryptonite

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    I keep meaning to go to a reputable breeder, but all of these fantastic rescue dogs keep finding their way to me. Literally. :)
     
  8. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    All of my dogs have been rescues. Sawyer was my first purebred and has been such a stellar example of his breed that I want to stack the odds in my favor and go through a reputable breeder for my next dog. No shame and like someone else said, I'm really not on board with ped s/n so would like the ability to keep the dog intact for as long as I see fit.
     
  9. Torch

    Torch New Member

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    Best visual ever. And exactly how I feel about Henry. Because at the end of the day, I've known plenty of well bred dogs that still have issues regardless of 'how they're raised.'
     
  10. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    And this is very true.
     
  11. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

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    Yes, sometimes it's "nature VS nurture".
     
  12. release the hounds

    release the hounds Active Member

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    I still don't see why people care so much about where others get their dogs from. A dog given a good life is a dog given a good life. Sure not every "well bred" dog is a gleaming example of the breed and not every "rescued" dog was on death's doorstep either before they were "saved". I fail to see what any of that has to do with anything. love the dogs you have and give them all you can the rest is just fluff
     
  13. JustaLilBitaLuck

    JustaLilBitaLuck New Member

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    Both my dogs are rescues, and they both came with a set of behavioral issues - however, most of the issues were not completely unknown to me when I adopted them. I love them dearly, and wouldn't trade them for anything.

    As for future dogs, I'm undecided. I'm playing around with a lot of options, but my next dog is hopefully a long time away so I'm not committed to anything. I've considered a couple unique breeds that would most likely come from a breeder, but I would love an adult rehome. I've also looked at release dogs from service dog organizations. So I really don't know.

    As for other people? If you're happy with your dog, and take good care of them, then that's what really matters - not where you got the dog from. Rescue, shelter, responsible breeder, private rehome, whatever - it's all about what was best for you at the time. I completely support people making educated choices when they look for a pet.
     
  14. meepitsmeagan

    meepitsmeagan Meagan & The Cattle Dog Crew

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    We've talked about this before but...

    From Stardog's article she wrote:

    "A third dog would mean no more fostering and no more additions for at least 10 years, so I knew I wanted to get "that dog" - the one that I could do anything I wanted to with and one that would fit seamlessly with the current household animals (and humans)."

    ^This is what goes through my head every time I think I want to keep Lucy. Or I see a cute cattle dog in a shelter. THIS WILL BE MY LAST DOG FOR A LONG TIME. NO MORE (minus Josh's bird dog). I want one without drive problems. Without weird quirks. Without a fear of the stairs. Without, without, without. I love and support rescue. I think they do great things. Obviously, I have a foster and a rescue of my own. However, my BYB is stable as a rock. We got really lucky. No, I don't plan to go through BYB again, but I feel it made a big difference. When you know what they saw/met during those crucial weeks of socialization, you've got it. I know what will happen when I put her in a situation. I don't always know with Lucy and Rider.

    I want specific things in my next ACD. I've done my research for three years, and now I'm waiting another two-three because I want a certain bitch. I talked with many, many people and have tried to be very active in the community of my breed. I LOVE MY BREEDER AND THE DOGS SHE PRODUCES. Could I find something in rescue that fit the bill? Probably. How long would it take? :shrug: I don't know. Obviously puppies are not foolproof. WE ALL REALIZE THIS. Things go wrong. But at least I will have the chance to try to turn it around.

    I will rescue again. And again. And again. And will foster until our numbers get too high. I plan on always having one adult rescue in the house. However, that's my limit. We always seem to attract shy, semi-unstable dogs and that's fine. We are a good place to bring them out of their shell, but not more than one at a time. I'm okay with that. I feel good about that. I plan on rescuing my next horse. I hope to foster children in the future.

    You have to go with what feels right for Y.O.U. No one else. I didn't mean for that post to be a novel. :eek:
     
  15. skittledoo

    skittledoo Crazy naked dog lady

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    I was thinking about this topic more last night and wanted to add a couple things.

    Everyone knows how much I love Bamm. His problems aside, he really is a neat dog and I do love him. But... And this is a very big BUT, having Cricket and Joey as a part of the equation has really helped me understand more and more that Bamm may not have been the best match for me honestly. This doesn't mean that Cricket and Joe have replaced Bamm's spot in my heart or anything, but they have helped me gain a better perspective on what I want and what I need in a dog. I will mainly be sticking with Ibizans from here on out as I really think this breed is a really good match for me. I know I'm going to lose friends when I get my next dog because I plan to buy(which may be sooner than I've planned since I've really been itching to show). I may end up with a puppy from a breeder or I may end up with a young adult that already has some show ring and coursing experience. We'll see.

    I have a couple friends that are so pro rescue that they think breeders are evil and are the problem. It's the people that dump their dogs that are the problem and the BYBs/puppy mills NOT the responsible breeders.

    When Josh eventually gets his hunting dog down the road we will go through a breeder for that dog as well.

    This doesn't mean I will never ever rescue. I may always have one or two rescues and I may foster at some point, but from here on out I would have to REALLY know the rescue dog before I'd be ok with that dog in my home permanently. My dogs must be ok in crates. My dogs must be ok with dogs. My dogs must be ok around cats. My dogs must be fine with kids. My dogs must not be fearful and must not be aggressive or overly reactive with strangers. Going through a breeder and knowing my future dog's lineage and health I feel like I honestly stack the odds in my favor.
     
  16. sassafras

    sassafras mushinois

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    Yes, exactly. Dogs aren't primarily in shelters because there aren't enough homes for them, but because those homes don't keep them.

    Again, I don't have anything against rescue. And when the time comes, it will be a struggle for me to decide what to do. Not that I am highly connected or anything, but there is literally one musher I know of whose husbandry and future breeding practices I'm completely comfortable with and unfortunately that number is not very likely to expand. So if I want an Alaskan puppy my options will be pretty limited. There are always adult sled dogs getting moved around, "retired," etc and there is a husky specific rescue here but I don't know that I will want an adult or a pure bred Sibe.

    It's several years off, and who knows if I'll even be skijoring by then. But I'll cross the bridge when I get there and I'll be way too old to feel guilty over something like this.
     
  17. ruffiangirl

    ruffiangirl New Member

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    Sassafras when it's time look at shelters/SPCA/rescues in Northern Alberta/BC because that is pretty much all we have are mushers dogs. While most still kill their cast offs a few have allowed rescues to take them. If you do want to look into adopting that is.
     
  18. Picklepaige

    Picklepaige Active Member

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    What about places like my shelter (primarily rural southern shelters in general) that have mostly young (6 weeks mostly) litters of puppies come in. My shelter literally has 20 + litters right now, and get in new ones every single day. Thanks to low cost spay/neuter, adoption promotion, and sending to shelters in the north where there aren't really puppies, we don't generally kill for space anymore, but would you not say that is regional overpopulation?

    Note that I plan on getting my next dog from a breeder (I do however plan on fostering at the same time) I just like giving a different perspective, as most people on these forums live in the north, where there really is no overpopulation.
     
  19. Julee

    Julee UNSTOPPABLE

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    Eh, I would not say that. There is an overabundance of pit bulls that get euth'd very frequently, because everyone who wants a pittie, has a pittie already. So, we bring up dogs from the south.
     
  20. DJEtzel

    DJEtzel New Member

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    I don't think it matters where you live, really. There is ALWAYS overpopulation and dogs that need to be saved.
     

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