The world's only military dogsled team

Discussion in 'Dog News and Articles' started by Sweet72947, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. Sweet72947

    Sweet72947 Squishy face

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    It is called Sirius, and it patrols in Greenland. I know that some of you have beef with National Geographic because of CM, but I love reading their magazine online, and I really love their pictures. This article is a good read, but it doesn't sit right with me though. They have pictures of the sled dogs, showing each one's beautiful face and their name, and then you read the article and find out that each one will be shot in the head when they retire. The team says its hard for them to do, and I understand that such working dogs may not be suitable for pet placement, but it still doesn't sit right. Thoughts?

    http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/01/sled-dogs/finkel-text
     
  2. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    The dogs are beautiful and they do look loved and cared for (and from the pics, it sure does look like they love their jobs)

    as for the euthanasia method.. perhaps its something about how the euthanasia process/injection would fair in those kinds of temps?..or something.. it does kind of rub me the wrong way (but that's how I feel with most working animals who are put down after they are too old to work, but that's life and it's understandable..) but then again, I don't know the specifics when it comes to pain and how different a pistol shot to the head is in comparison to the injection method.. perhaps done the right way it really is painless and faster?

    I understand them not being able to adopt these animals out.. where would they go? who could fund to get them there? are their temperaments/drives suitable for life as a pet or even just regular sled dog?

    *shrug* It's an interesting article (with lovely pictures!) those dogs sure are athletes!!
     
  3. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    oh and for anyone who had trouble finding the "meet the pups" section, here it is
    http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/01/sled-dogs/dog-mugshots

    If you click the picture they have little descriptions about them :) I love how personal he is about them (they live with him at his farm), and knows each of their personalities and their likes and dislikes
     
  4. Sweet72947

    Sweet72947 Squishy face

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    I don't have a problem with the method of putting the dogs down, when done right a gunshot to the head is quick and painless. I just hate how they work for us, and they don't even get to retire decently, they just get killed. I'm not saying dogs and other animals shouldn't work, you can look at those pictures and see that they obviously enjoy what they do very much.
     
  5. ravennr

    ravennr ಥ⌣ಥ

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    The dogs are drop-dead gorgeous.

    I also just assumed the method for putting them down had to be that it was cost-effective and suitable for that climate, but I can only be sure on the first part (not sure how the drug reacts to temperatures or if it would only result in a terribly ill dog that didn't actually die). I can't believe they actually have enough people to volunteer to do this, though. That shocked me more than any other part of the story at all; I assumed due to all the factors, right down to age requirement, they'd have very few people to take the job.


    It said part of the reason the dogs are put down is because they, understandably, aren't suitable for adoption (if they even make it to retirement age; I wonder how many dogs die of natural causes rather than actually retiring and being put down with a gun) because they are more wolf than dog. Is that just a figure of speech on their part in trying to describe the dogs and their personalities, or do they actually carry some wolf content in them? I'd think, with how much rescues are importing dogs from other countries, someone would be willing to foot the bill to take in what they could and even let them live a sort of sanctuary life, if they were suited for it and comfortable in that sort of place. I can't imagine that no one anywhere would be willing to do that, anyway.
    I can't imagine having to shoot them either, knowing they are risking their lives to get me across that land and are so helpful with everything.


    Very good read! Thanks for posting! :)
     

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