Temperament testing

Discussion in 'Dogs - General Dog Chat' started by Adrienne, Mar 2, 2010.

  1. Adrienne

    Adrienne New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,645
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Soon to be six
    Location:
    Minnesota
    So the shelter manager asked me if I would be interested in learning how to temperament test our shelter dogs~basically she will train me and then I will assist her two nights a week testing our dogs. We would get caught up on testing the dogs we already have and then do two nights a week on new dogs. I am so super psyched about this! It's one step closer to a job working with dogs!
     
  2. xpaeanx

    xpaeanx Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    Messages:
    8,387
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Congrats! :)
     
  3. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2007
    Messages:
    6,403
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Two dogs, three cats
    Location:
    Central Texas
    Awesome!

    I highly suggest watching the DVD "Am I Safe," Sarah Kalnajs is really good at describing what you're looking at and her video clips are really great too.
     
  4. Lolas Dad

    Lolas Dad New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Messages:
    1,017
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What happens to the dogs that do not pass the temperament test?
     
  5. PoodleMommy

    PoodleMommy Yorkie Love

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2006
    Messages:
    6,443
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Congrats!
     
  6. AGonzalez

    AGonzalez Not a lurker

    Joined:
    May 30, 2008
    Messages:
    3,702
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    They've obviously contracted Suckvitis and we know the only cure to that....

    Most of the time animals that do not pass are PTS because they become a liability to the shelter and a potential new owner.
     
  7. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2007
    Messages:
    6,403
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Two dogs, three cats
    Location:
    Central Texas
    The main purpose of a temperment test at a shelter is to determine what kind of home would be best for the dog. If the dog does not get adopted into the correct home, he WILL be back at the shelter (or worse), so it is in their best interest to get the right home the first time. Most testers don't categorize the dog as "pass" or "fail," but rather use the test as information about what kind of qualities the dog has and a heads-up about any behaviorial problems the adopter may need to be aware of.

    Unless it's a no-kill shelter, of course shelters do euthanize dogs. Shelters around here euthanize 50-95% of dogs that come in (yes, I know of a specific shelter that euthes 95%). Kill shelters use temperment tests to determine which dogs are most adoptable; more adoptable dogs mean that they get adopted faster and the shelter will be able to adopt a higher percentage of dogs in the long run.
     
  8. Amstaffer

    Amstaffer New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2
    Location:
    Milwaukee WI
    Congrats...very cool!

    .... . .
    >envious<
     
  9. Adrienne

    Adrienne New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,645
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Soon to be six
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Thanks for the congrats guys, I am super stoked. Also, thanks Lizzy for the rec. I will definitely check it out.

    Again, Lizzy has the right answer, the testing is to determine which type of home the dog will do best in, what it's personality is, how high energy, what type of motivation helps the dog learn best, etc.

    We do euth some animals but we have a really high adoption rate. I think last month we pts four dogs, one of old age (had every pain problem in the book) and three for behavioral issues (this could be bites or returned multiple times by adopters). It sucks but it's a fact of life, we need the kennel space to help the dogs we can rehome. We have a pretty low euth rate, last year (09) we pts 20 dogs which is a remarkably low number.
     
  10. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    94,266
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    3, Bimmer, GSDX (m); Kharma, Fila Brasileiro (f);
    Location:
    Where the selas blooms
    Home Page:
    Good to know there will be one more person out there doing TTs who has good sense and won't be penalizing dogs who have just been dumped and are scared and confused.
     
  11. PoodleMommy

    PoodleMommy Yorkie Love

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2006
    Messages:
    6,443
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Seriously?!

    I didnt see this until early this morning, when of course I have COFFEE in my mouth meaning COFFEE is now on my KEYBOARD!!!!

    :p
     
  12. AGonzalez

    AGonzalez Not a lurker

    Joined:
    May 30, 2008
    Messages:
    3,702
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    HAHA, Sorry PM, I couldn't help myself. I was trying not to be too tasteless because of course there's nothing amusing about the potential for dogs to be PTS...but, I think in this case it wasn't too horrible of me to say. :)
     

Share This Page