Sunflower Cluster pictures - dobes, collies, GSDs, and more

Discussion in 'Dog Pictures and Pet Photos' started by Saeleofu, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    I'm not saying they don't move funny ;) I think people see them and assume they have something wrong with them like HD or something and that isn't the case.

    If I were to get another GSD, it would be from German working lines. My German showline girl was nearly perfect though. And there were things I liked about my Amlines, although they weren't really what I'd call ideal for what I want in the breed and both were loved pets. Actually, if I could have combined the best of the two Amline dogs that I had into one healthy dog, that would have been a pretty nice GSD. I think that I'd be most likely to find what I want in German working lines though, both in structure and temperament. I also know someone who breeds really outstanding ones :)
     
  2. Upendi&Mina

    Upendi&Mina Mainstreme Elitist

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    The bolded part SO MUCH, I spent almost a week traveling with my friend and helping her with her *gasp* Amline GSDs at a show and frankly they got around completely fine. They were in no way crippled or in pain as people seem to think, and played as long and hard as any 8 month old puppies I know. It's also important to remember that when not stacked their backs do not have such an extreme slope, the way they are stacked drops their rears quite a bit.

    I also find it interesting that everyone rags on GSDs and their slopes when I saw some Irish Setters this weekend who had a pretty extreme slope when stacked (I would argue that some of these dogs might rival GSDs in how far their rears dropped if stacked in the same manner), yet I don't really hear people calling them crippled. Are some GSDs very extreme? Yes, but their are breeders taking things to extremes in EVERY BREED, so this is not solely a German Shepherd problem and frankly there are some breeds who I am much more concerned about healthwise.

    Just my two cents of course.
     
  3. Whisper

    Whisper Kaleidoscopic Eye

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    I'm glad you have had good experiences with American show line GSDs. I have not. I've only known a handful, but every single one of them looked like they moved with difficulty, and some outright limped. I've also known several dogs from various working lines and show/working crosses, and of course while being from a certain country or group doesn't guarantee quality, they were all fit dogs with no limitations in moving swiftly and efficiently.
    I don't expect anyone to agree with me, but I do reserve the right to "cringe" at any dog I do not think is a good examples of what the breed should be (a versatile, physically capable working dog).
    "The breeding of Shepherd dogs must be the breeding of working dogs. This must always be the aim, or we shall cease to produce working dogs." I see that happening in the AKC ring. Many breed for conformation only, not any kind of working ability. Fortunately not all.

    Upendi&Mina, I do agree with you about setters. I've seen some horrid toplines in different breeds. With GSDs I think it's exaggerated because of their stack.
     

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