Strawberries

Discussion in 'Dog Food and Recipes' started by nedim, Jun 12, 2005.

  1. nedim

    nedim New Member

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    Are they o.k. for dogs?
     
  2. oriondw

    oriondw user not active

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    Im sure they are :))

    At least i never heard otherwise.
     
  3. Dakotah_2009

    Dakotah_2009 OOO YEA SHHHAKE IT!!

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    i might give my grandma's dog a strawberry??
     
  4. nedim

    nedim New Member

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    Ok, thanks. I had some a while back and Peanut started begging, so I put them away. Do you know if they will cause an unwanted reaction, such as diarreah(sp?)
     
  5. gaddylovesdogs

    gaddylovesdogs no touchy

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    My girls love strawberries, sit there and give me the "I'm starving look" and I can't help giving them a little.
     
  6. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Moderation is the key word. Giving a dog too much of just about anything can cause unfortunate repercussions, lol!

    My girls love it when the blackberries are ripe. They go with me and pick them - well, Shiva picks her own and Kharma watches me pick, then sits and nudges me when she figures I have a handful, lol! I'm not sure who is sharper, Shiva for picking her own (so much fun to watch her pull her lips back and delicately pluck off just the ripest berries without getting impaled on the briars), or Kharma, who gets me to take all the risks for her.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2005
  7. gaddylovesdogs

    gaddylovesdogs no touchy

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    There's nothing as good as fresh blackberries! We like going out by this path and picking some.
     
  8. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    I made my car payments a couple of summers ago picking blackberries and selling them to Chef Jock over in Pigeon Forge . . . talk about some hot, scratchy work. Oddly enough I enjoyed it though. Jock taught me a few things too - like how to freeze the blackberries properly!
     
  9. Barb04

    Barb04 Love my pets Staff Member

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    CJ loves strawberries. Max is in love with watermelon. Now Kona is another story, she'll eat anything.
     
  10. GSDFan05

    GSDFan05 New Member

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    My parents have a berry-picking dog too! :D They have thornless blackberry bushes (whoever came up with that hybrid is a saint!) in their backyard, and their retriever mix loves to graze on the lower branches. :p
     
  11. Athe

    Athe New Member

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    My dogs love berry picking with me :) Blueberries, Strawberries, Raspberries, and blackberries are wonderful for dogs. Just make sure they are organic (do not have any pesticides) or that you know they have no pesticides on them where they are growing. Strawberries are horrible for having loads of pesticides, one of the main reasons I will only pick strawberries from known sources or purchase organic (certified to be grown without pesticides) ;)
     
  12. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    None used here on the farm :D

    Also no hormones, antibiotics (unless we have a sick calf), chemical growth enhancers, etc.! And we only spot-spray weeds. :D
     
  13. Athe

    Athe New Member

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    Renee750il, you own a farm. How lucky for you to know what goes into your produce :) So, do you have a big farmstead or a nice little hobby farm. I just bought a home last year with 16 acres and I am going to have a garden next year (didn't have a chance to start one this year, and I couldn't afford a tiller this year :( ) My sister and I are also thinking of getting a few cows to go to pasture with her 2 horses and I wanted a few chicks. I think the only problem being, with all the good ideas I have....I really don't think I could kill the poor little things when it comes time, or send them out to be slaughtered...just thinking that Bessie the cow might be on my plate would probably have me in tears :eek: It's so much better when you have never been buddies with your food. So, for now I tossed out the idea of raising my own livestock and will just stick with produce.

    At least I have you to ask if I need to inquire about any thing...hoping

    I am a big supporter of small farms who believe in and can stand behind what they produce. It makes me shudder to think what the big food chains feed livestock and all the horrible substances used in growing produce. For myself I will spend the extra few dollars to purchase free range chickens & eggs, free range beef etc, organic fruits, veggies, and grains. I will not purchase farmed salmon due to all the antibiotics used and the growth feed pellets they feed them. Not only are they unhealthy for us, but, they pollute the waters and disease the wild salmon.
    People think I'm a little wingy with my organic only purchases. :D
     
  14. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Good call, especially on the salmon. Farm raised salmon also has a much higher mercury level than wild.

    We've got 60 acres and raise beef Angus. It was kind of hard for me to get used to hauling off the calves when they reached the right weight, but it's just part of it that you have to reconcile yourself to. As Charley says, we treat them well and let them have good lives for as long as they are with us . . . now, there have been a few I haven't been all that sorry to see leave! Bull calves can get mean and quarrelsome for no reason other than they are bulls. Our big bulls, especially OJ, are pets. Lucky is one we raised ourselves. The coyotes got at him when he was being born - we could see the tooth marks on his little hooves! We carried him down over the hill near the house and had to bottle feed him for several weeks as it affected his mother too and she didn't have enough milk.

    We haven't had time to put in a garden - something I've been after Charley about. I really hate paying over $2.00 a pound for tomatoes and $0.75 apiece for bell peppers! :rolleyes: Especially when we could raise better ones ourselves with very little trouble or work after the initial preparation of the soil and planting. I'd like to grow several different types of garlic, potatoes, some gourmet melons, Chinese green beans, some of those little European strawberries, etc. and maybe sell some to one of the restaurants in Sevier County or Knoxville.

    You'll need to put some sort of grazing livestock on your property to keep the property up. A Jersey cow will give you good milk and butter, and you can get the little wild burros that are being relocated, but you will need a good electric fence. The burros are also good to keep the coyotes at bay.

    I can't remember what kind of dog(s) you have. You'll want one that can handle groundhogs . . .
     
  15. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    By the way, you might be better off just renting a big tiller for a couple of years until you get things sorted out, then you might be better off buying a good used tractor.

    Oh, and you might want to look into prawn farming . . .
     
  16. Athe

    Athe New Member

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    I hate to take over this post like this. ;)
    Renee750il, you are a wealth of information. We just bought the property last fall and we haven't moved the horses out yet. We are in the process of building a barn and pasture. We have 3 Newfoundland dogs, Doberman and a Rottweiler (she concerns me with her high prey drive and one of the horses is a kicker :eek: ), I have confidence she could take care of the ground hogs. I havent seen any groundhogs yet...are they attracted to the cows and horse manure?
    I was thinking of a goat, but a burro sounds better, thanks. A Jersey cow sounds great as well. My Mother grew up on a farm and remembers (vaguely) how to churn butter etc. That is a great idea. I also read in my book Healing pets with natures miracle cures by Henry Pasternak DVM, CVA that raw milk is really good for dogs and cats. It contains the essential fatty acids and many vitamins etc. He said its when it's pasteurized that it becomes unhealthy for them...?? I have no idea how true this is since I don't have any experience with raw milk. We are not going over board with animals as it is just she and I (we were never able to catch us a husband :D ). So, we are just going to get a few animals thats all we can handle.
    Is prawn farming profitable? or do you have other uses for them? We don't have a brook on our property, just a tiny little stream that semms to be dried up.

    That is quite some thing with little OJ, something like that would make you very close to a certain animal. We are fortunate that we have no wolves around here, but we do have plenty of Coyotes like yourself. One farmer told me to take nylons filled with dog fur and put around the perimeter of the property to keep coyotes away. I think myself that this is a myth as my dogs travel a trail in the woods with me all the time and the Coyote feces are abundant, my dogs pee on it and they seem to have a communication going with the Coyotes...the coyotes are still travelling that same trail...so, I don't think my dogs have them the least bit scared and my Newf's leave a trail of undercoat blowing in the wind this time of year so the fur is not chasing away the coyotes
     
  17. gaddylovesdogs

    gaddylovesdogs no touchy

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    [​IMG]
     
  18. Barb04

    Barb04 Love my pets Staff Member

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    I'll stear this back the right way. I just got my fresh strawberries from the local farm yesterday, but no one was eager to eat them so I treated myself. Looks like the dogs will have to wait for the next batch.
     
  19. GSDFan05

    GSDFan05 New Member

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    I agree about natural grown produce on small farms...even the biggest reddest strawberries from a store don't even begin to compete with a nice sun-ripened, "home made" berry! We're moving this summer and I'm really sad about leaving our berry bushes and fruit trees behind...our baby peach trees are getting their first edible fruit this summer! I'd love to live on another place with acreage again someday, it's really wonderful to be able to plant all your favorites and watch them grow.
     
  20. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Transplant some of your strawberries to strawberry pots - along with the dirt they're growing in now! You can set some new plants from the runners :)
     

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