Spays and heart murmurs

Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by SarahHound, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. SarahHound

    SarahHound New Member

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    Are there any risks in spaying a bitch with a heart murmur? When we adopted Katy, her foster parents said the vet had found a mild murmur when she had her last mange treatment. They said puppies often grow out of them, so I didn't think much about it. I don't even really know a great deal about them.

    I had planned to let her have one season, then spayed 3 months afterwards. However I just read something about a cat not able to be spayed because of a heart murmur. Little bit worried now.

    It's not been checked since, as we're no where near the vet and I don't really like going unless we really have to, so I thought I'd have it checked before her spay.
     
  2. elegy

    elegy overdogged

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    Depends on the heart murmur, I would imagine.
     
  3. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    Agreed. The vet should be able to tell you about if they think it's worth the risk.
     
  4. JessLough

    JessLough Love My Mutt

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    The severity of a heart murmur is really what matters. If its major enough, it is risky to anesthetize.
     
  5. ~WelshStump~

    ~WelshStump~ New Member

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    Talk to your own vet.
    Jinjo with a pretty sizable murmur as a puppy, was neutered easily before 6 months (I'll never forgive myself for doing it now though, at least as young as he was).
    Middle age, he popped a toe and they put him out to reset it, they did have problems though and had to wake him and re put him out after he started getting nasty with them not being out enough, but they even sent him home half loopy and he's still with us.
    Last year, at 10, he abscessed a tooth, his heart had worsened a bit, but he did just fine, threw up a bit because I did give him a tiny bit for breakfast, we didn't expect them to be able to do everything right that day, but two x-rays, full dental, tooth removal, all after a long consult, and he got to go home than afternoon.

    We go back this Monday for a good look at his heart with another vet, because it has worsened, just listening to it they've always called it a "3 out of 6", but over the last year it's now gone to a "4 out of 6", so they want it looked at. I really don't know why though, I still swear up and down that in the end his legs probably wont be able to keep up with him anymore anyways. "Heart murmur", is not in itself as much of a threat as many owners believe.
     
  6. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    I personally would wait and see if she grows out of it. I could be nothing, or it could be a risk under anesthesia. I don't know how vets are over there, but here most of them would probably recommend spaying anyway even with the risk because they're so crazy about needing to SPAY ALL THE THINGS as soon as possible, even if there are risks. Of course I'm sure there are vets that aren't like that, but here it seems they're all too common.

    If she outgrows it, no worries. If she doesn't, it doesn't mean she's doomed. Some dogs develop problems later in life that are related to the murmur, others don't.
     
  7. Linds

    Linds Twin 2

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    Also, on top of that aren't Sighthounds typically not the best under anesthesia? I would think that paired with a heart murmur isn't the best combo.
     
  8. SarahHound

    SarahHound New Member

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    Yeah, that worries me. Saying that, I think the anaesthetic risks are quite low. I think its something to speak with a vet about, I just hate my vet, which sucks a bit!

    I really don't want to leave her entire as I have Freuchie around a lot who still has his balls and I just don't feel able to safely keep them apart.
     
  9. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

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    Does your vet have an EKG? If so, I'd make sure she's hooked up to one if the vet still hears a heart murmur after an exam, before anesthesia.
     
  10. SarahHound

    SarahHound New Member

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    I'm somewhat embarrassed to say I don't know what that is. :p Can you enlighten me a bit?
     
  11. SarahHound

    SarahHound New Member

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  12. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

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  13. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    We use an ECG for all our surgery patients. We used to do them pre-op but stopped for whatever reason.

    I would make sure if you spay her she has good monitoring. We do ECG, heart rate, respiration rate, temperature, CO2, O2, reflexes, BP...maybe some more stuff but I don't do surgeries much so I don't remember if there's more. We also have most animals have an IV catheter and fluids, and of course pre-op bloodwork. It makes for a pricey spay, but to me it's worth the safety of the animal especially if they're high-risk (I think our spay is around $400, maybe more :p)
     

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