Spay questions

Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by skittledoo, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. skittledoo

    skittledoo Crazy naked dog lady

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    I've been thinking more and more lately about when we are going to spay Cricket. It's ridiculously expensive to spay out here it seems... Way more expensive than it would be if we were still in New Mexico.

    My questions:

    1. How do you deal with the fear and anxiety of having your dog put under for the surgery? I guess I'm just worried that Cricket may not do so well or have a reaction to the anesthesia or something. I'm sure she would be fine, but I can't help but get worked up worrying about how she would do.

    2. One of our clients recommended we look into the local shelter out here that does more affordable spay/neuter. They take your dog to a vet that does the surgery and you pick up your dog the next morning. They have the vet listed that they take dogs to in case people want to contact the vet themselves, but its a program they operate to help people S/N out here and it not be $500 like my vet quoted me. With that said, what are your thoughts on a program like this. Is this something I should look into or should I be leery? My main concern is that I want an experienced vet to do the surgery and not a vet student since I would rather someone not operate on my dog that is learning.

    3. For female dogs that tend to mark.... Did your female stop/decrease marking after being spayed or did they continue to mark all the time? Cricket marks a lot outside, but has been marking in the house recently... I think she is going to go into heat again soon.

    4. Did you notice any other differences in your dog after being spayed? Temperament? Weight? Etc.

    I'm getting closer to wanting to spay Cricket, but I don't want to jump into it without first making sure it's something I want to do. We managed her last heat really well so I know we can handle her being intact, but when she is in heat we miss out on a lot and we have quite a few classes coming up that she wouldn't be able to take if she is in heat since my trainer is very adamant about no dogs in season in any classes ever. Right now I'm crossing my fingers she doesn't go into heat in the next few weeks since we are getting ready to take her CGC test, lol. I probably won't spay her until after another season at the very least and I may wait even longer, but right now I'm just trying to do my research and weigh the pros and cons.
     
  2. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

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    Well, to address one of your concerns, we had Enzo spayed at a clinic, (s/n clinic only) and she did fine. I think a lot of clinics vet donate their time to do these low cost s/n's.

    Second, I haven't noticed any difference in Enzos temperament. She never marks, so that's not something I have any experience with. Her coat did change. She never (to this day) grew her undercoat back properly. Its there, but its no longer the correct lab type double coat.

    She's still.ridiculous to try to.keep weight ON as well.
     
  3. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    The reason spays (and neuters) can be so expensive is that more and more vets are doing pre-op bloodwork, IV catheter/fluids, more extensive monitoring, more complete pain control, etc. This is the way it SHOULD be. Honestly if you're worried about how she'll do under anesthesia, I wouldn't try to get a cheap spay because that usually means no bloodwork, no IV/fluids, often no pain meds, etc - and in some appalling cases not even a sterile surgical area.

    If you want to risk it, then do the cheap spay. If you want to make sure everything is done properly, do the more expensive one BUT ask what all they include and make sure they're doing everything they need to be doing for that price.
     
  4. Southpaw

    Southpaw orange iguanas.

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    To ensure the safest surgery I would absolutely do pre-anesthetic bloodwork, and make sure they place an IV catheter and use monitoring devices.... I've spent time at a clinic that DOESN'T do any of this and that is the reason why their surgeries were so cheap. Every time I watched them do a surgery, it felt like a trainwreck waiting to happen. Having a technician just check to make sure the heart is still beating is so so so so so bad and unsafe.

    Obviously there is always a risk when you anesthetize an animal, but by taking the proper precautions you greatly minimize the risk.

    Juno was spayed at 6 months old and she marks all the time. Never in the house, but when we're at the dog park she hikes herself up on every bush or tree that she comes across. I don't care. I don't let her do it on leashed walks though. I can't say if it affected her behavior at all because she was young. She maintains a proper weight just fine. Only post-spay issue we've had is that she's incontinent.
     
  5. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    1. I just remember that this is a surgery done 1000000 times a day. at shelters. to puppies. to kittens. to sick animals. to unhealthy animals. and they do just fine. I also like to wait in the clinic while they have their surgery, my vet was fine with it. I brought my computer and did work, it was nice being there. Maybe just find somewhere close by to wait..

    2.I volunteered at a shelter and we did loads of s/n clinics. These are the kind of surgeries that vets can practically do blindfolded... A lot of times, vets from local clincs donate their time or offer to help out. and even the vets on staff are very good..it's practically ALL they do so chance are.. they are good at the surgery ITSELF

    BUT vets don't charge that much for fun. There do a better job.. fact. They have better equipment, more space, are focused on YOUR DOG alone and There aren't 20-30 other dogs waiting to get surgeries/recovering. The vet is focused on YOUR DOG. and so are the vet-techs. They are focused on her recovery, know her chart, know her name etc.. You get pain killers, blood work, IV etc.. your dog is on like 10 monitors the whole time. They are checking every little thing. They are with her while she recovers, and watching her closely during the entire recovery/surgery.

    I'm not saying shelters don't do a good job, clinics are GREAT.. but lets face it. 60 dogs a day (and thats way less than average). 35 in recovery lets say. 2 vets. handful of vet techs maybe.. limited space. lots of people. line outside. charts kind of everywhere.. things slip through the cracks.

    Don't get me wrong, shelters do spays all the time. they do em fast. they do em often and dogs come out just fine.. but there is a price to pay for cheap and quick. It's an assembly line of sorts..

    One thing that would bother me is the staying over night thing.. shelters are stressful. the noise. the smells. the whole thing.. don't know why they would want her to stay overnight

    3. I would guess it's the same for females as it is for males. Some say that s/n early stops them from ever marking/mounting.. but once they start, it's about training. not hormones.

    I would go back to potty training/being leashed to you til you get the marking under control. Chances are, spayed or not.. she's gonna do it.

    4. Never noticed any changes. Weight or otherwise. spaying/neutering really young (before puberty) you see lots of changes but after the fact..never noticed it.

    Some people say with the hormones under control some females are less..erm..bitchy and males are less OMGOMGFEMALE.
    but I don't think it's a s/n thing.. I think it's a training thing personally. Plenty of intact dogs are perfectly behaved.
    Romeo isn't neutered. He neither mounts nor marks. never has.

    It sucks keeping them still (females have to wait FOREVER while the stitches heal..crate time ain't fun, neither is the cone lol ) but other than that, the surgery has always seemed pretty easy with every dog I've seen go through it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  6. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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  7. elegy

    elegy overdogged

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    Spay/neuter clinics are fine as long as everything goes well. And most of the time everything does go well. Most of the time all of the monitoring (EKC, pulse ox, respirations, C02, blood pressure, and temperature) and pre-emptive stuff we do at the clinic where I work is probably "overkill". BUT if something *does* happen, we're going to catch it faster and be able to deal with it.

    Like Fran said, the doctors at spay/neuter clinics are excellent at the surgery itself, but every anesthetic case is different. And that's my hangup with clinics. The sheer volume doesn't lend itself to close monitoring.
     
  8. skittledoo

    skittledoo Crazy naked dog lady

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    Thank you guys so much. I'm going to call around to some of the other vets in the area to get price quotes and ask them what all they do when they spay. I'd rather be safe than sorry and do prefer the idea of them focusing more on my dog to make sure she is safe. I still haven't decided if I want to do this soon or wait a while longer, but luckily I don't absolutely have to make the decision right this very minute.
     
  9. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    My friend just moved here from VA, and she was telling me about this very program just yesterday. :D She had considered doing it with her dog, but in the end got him neutered at her vet instead.

    The problem was, first of all he'd be transported in a truck with a ton of other dogs... shelter dogs. Shelter dogs with any number of other communicable diseases. Not to mention how stressful it would be to be in such close quarters with so many other dogs he didn't know. For my friend, this was pretty much the deciding factor; for me it would be as well, but I do believe a lot of dogs would handle it fine.

    Then once the dogs get to the clinic, you have all the concerns that have already been mentioned - no pre-op bloodwork, less than ideal monitoring during surgery, etc.

    And then after surgery, the dog has to spend the night in a stressful place and go on another stressful car ride.

    If you're looking for another low-cost S/N place in VA, according to my friend, there is none. Personally, I'd just get it done at my vet.
     
  10. Shai

    Shai & the Muttly Crew

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    (1) Calmly take dog to vet
    (2) Go on a long walk, eat ice cream, etc. for a few hours while obsessively checking your phone
    (3) Calmly pick up dog and laugh at yourself for getting so worked up

    At least, that's how it went for me ;)

    Your call. I know vets who volunteer their time for that sort of thing and they are some of the same vets I would take my dogs to for general surgery. I elected to have bloodwork done first, etc. and around here they only offer the low cost s/n for cats and pit bulls so wasn't an option anyway. You could always try asking who they are having do the surgeries and look them up first.

    N/A

    Kim was spayed before her first heat, if that makes a difference. No change in temperament, and she can still eat whatever the heck she wants and not put on weight. 'Course her ridiculous coat always make her look like a sausage on toothpicks but she's a wirey thing and always has been.
     
  11. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

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    I don't always elect EKG/BP monitoring for my pets under surgery but I always do bloodwork and IV cath/fluids. I want that vein access ready if needed, and the fluids always make me feel better about using the anesthetic drugs in the first place.

    Don't price shop. Find someone you trust and use them.

    The clinic I worked at had spays as "cheap" as $130. That was without anything at all. We literally saw people only able to afford a spay and a rabies vaccine. No pain management or anything. (Yes, we saw an equal amount of people who *could* afford it but chose to spend their money on purses and clothes and makeup.) Thankfully, it was not the norm and most people chose pain management and minimal pre-op bloodwork at least.
     
  12. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    Oh and if you do choose your regular vet.. many will work with you when it comes with payment plans and such.

    They know the shelter/drives are price competitive.. tell them your situation and they will probably help you out.
     
  13. stardogs

    stardogs Behavior Nerd

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    When we spay Snipe and Aeri they'll be going to the vet at the shelter I used to work at in SC - and yes, I'll be driving the 3 hours one way to have them done there. Why? Because I've seen the way the clinic is run and the results of the vet's skill and I *know* what to expect from them, *plus* it's $55 instead of $250. It's a win-win. ;)

    All that is to say, do your research and consider driving if you need to to find the right match for you and your girl - talk to people in classes and at the dog park, at trials, etc. about who did their dog's surgery and how they felt it turned out. Price shop, but also ask what it includes and if you can remove some things to bring the price down (i.e. do bloodwork at one vet that has it cheaper, but the surgery at a clinic you trust, etc.). Take advantage of the time you have now to cover alllll your bases!

    I figure that the 6 hours on the road is worth it because I know the skill of the doctor, the way the clinic runs things, the price includes pain meds and monitoring during surgery, I can have my vet do bloodwork ahead of time if desired, and I'll get the girls back the same day. Heck I might even be allowed to pick them up as soon as they are out of recovery because the staff knows me! LOL
     
  14. Grab

    Grab Active Member

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    I'm usually present (at least in the building) when my pets are under, simply because I work at the clinic. But, even if I didn't, I keep in mind that the vets and technicians don't want anything to happen to their patients..any more than I want something to happen to my pet.

    As others have said, vets can have expensive prices for a reason...the materials used in surgical procedures are pretty costly. And the prices are constantly rising. Add on the bloodwork and monitoring, and the costs aren't that high.

    We do have a low cost clinic in town. I've not had to use them, but I'm sure they're a fine clinic. They do have a few vets who rotate turns on the surgeries, I believe. While I think one vet who takes his turn is perhaps a little questionable (we had to "re-spay" a cat because they left an ovary and piece of uterus in and she kept having heat cycles) I don't think it reflects on the entire clinic.

    My females aren't markers, so can't answer that one. Newt's behavior and personality are exactly the same as before her spay.

    None of my pets have fluctuated on weight after their spays and neuters
     
  15. skittledoo

    skittledoo Crazy naked dog lady

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    Thanks so much guys. I totally don't mind having to drive further to a vet... In fact, I didn't even think about that option. I live right near Washington DC so a lot of prices on anything is higher. Heck I pay 1300 a month for a super tiny one bedroom apartment. Vet prices out here are more expensive than other places as well. I should definitely look in some of the more country areas surrounding the DC area since they are bound to be a bit cheaper, but still do all the bloodwork etc. My mission this upcoming week is to call around and get price quotes as well as what is included in the price quote. I definitely would want her to have some sort of pain management as well since I couldn't imagine her having the surgery and not having pain management. I'm especially going to check out vets in some of the areas we've been considering moving to when our lease is up here.
     
  16. momto8

    momto8 New Member

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    At the clinic I work for all our spays/neuters are low cost, normally around 60.00 for a dog. We've done dozens in the last week and one thing I've learned is that I stressed way too much over having all my dogs done, spays/neuters are pretty simple!
     
  17. monkeys23

    monkeys23 New Member

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    1. How do you deal with the fear and anxiety of having your dog put under for the surgery? I guess I'm just worried that Cricket may not do so well or have a reaction to the anesthesia or something. I'm sure she would be fine, but I can't help but get worked up worrying about how she would do.
    - To be honest it does not worry me. If you did pre-op bloodwork and have a good vet, you should have absolutely nothing to worry about. Seriously, its not that big of a deal.

    2. One of our clients recommended we look into the local shelter out here that does more affordable spay/neuter. They take your dog to a vet that does the surgery and you pick up your dog the next morning. They have the vet listed that they take dogs to in case people want to contact the vet themselves, but its a program they operate to help people S/N out here and it not be $500 like my vet quoted me. With that said, what are your thoughts on a program like this. Is this something I should look into or should I be leery? My main concern is that I want an experienced vet to do the surgery and not a vet student since I would rather someone not operate on my dog that is learning.
    -Lily was spayed through something like that. When I adopted her they dropped her off and I picked her up to take her home for the first time. They were fine. The same place (they are open 24/7) took great care of her when she was attacked in 2010 on a Sunday, though my vet did the follow up care. The attending surgeon during that horrible incident was actually a northern breed person and went out of her way to allay my concerns.

    3. For female dogs that tend to mark.... Did your female stop/decrease marking after being spayed or did they continue to mark all the time? Cricket marks a lot outside, but has been marking in the house recently... I think she is going to go into heat again soon.
    - My spayed bitches both mark.

    4. Did you notice any other differences in your dog after being spayed? Temperament? Weight? Etc.
    - NADA!!!! Still the same great girls! Just spay Cricket already!!!! IMO with the risk of pyo alone, I'd have done it a LONG time ago if I were you... I mean she's a mutt anyway, so why not!
     
  18. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    Why not? Increased risk of hypothyroidism, some cancers, orthopedic problems, cruciate tears, incontinence...the list goes on and on. She's still a very young dog - just over a year if I remember right. Personally I would still wait at least another year. Pyo is pretty much a non-issue in a dog that young, and if she DID somehow get it, she could be spayed at that point to treat it.


    If I had the choice, I would NOT have neutered Gavroche, knowing what I know now. I'm 99% sure he wouldn't have hypothyroidism or urinary incontinence/UTI if he was still intact.
     
  19. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

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    word :hail:
     
  20. MicksMom

    MicksMom Active Member

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    Have you looked into Friends of Animals? The only hitch is you have to use one of their vets. Low cost Spay/Neiter info is on the right side of the page http://www.friendsofanimals.org/index.html


    I've known 2 spayed females who still marked- my sister's Dal mix and my grandmother's Toy Poodle. My sister's dog even lifted her leg like a male.
     

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