Scottish deerhounds

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by AdrianneIsabel, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    Who has experience with them?

    We're looking at the breed for the future. Denis' dream dog has always been an Irish wolfhound but we're considering a Scottish deerhound as well. This wouldn't be for a long time, well after both of the pit bulls go.

    Anyone have experience with the breed? Pros, cons, where do they fit best?
     
  2. Red Chrome

    Red Chrome New Member

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    I groom one. Really neat dog. Very much a hound.
     
  3. PWCorgi

    PWCorgi Priscilla Winifred Corgi

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    Whether an IW or a deerhound, it MUST be named Gandolf.

    That is really all I have, but I'm watching this thread!
     
  4. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    Hahahahaha okay!

    I honestly know nothing about them, I have known several IW and they're awesome but the lifespan freaks me out and from what I have read the deerhounds can be a bit longer lived?

    Behavior wise I'm totally clueless. I'm pretty sure eventually I'll own a whippet but this "giant scruffy" is really a Denis pick for our "chill and cuddle" dog.
     
  5. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    They are what I'd consider a heartache breed. Usually dead by 9, usually from bone cancer or bloat. They have a long history of being REALLY inbred - not just a wee bit but WOW inbred.
     
  6. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    That's a huge bummer :-/ is the same to be said for Borzoi? I've tried to encourage them in exchange and he's slightly perked. I really don't want an IW for the heartbreak factor so replacing that with a deerhound heartbreak is pointless.
     
  7. Shai

    Shai & the Muttly Crew

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    I know a couple here that do agility and obedience, but yeah they may not be as heartbreaky as IW but they don't seem to be long-lived.
     
  8. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    Honestly, if the breed is right for you, the "heartbreak" factor is worth it. Great Danes are known for it....you just do the best you can, stack the odds in your favor, and enjoy the wonderful times you do have. Then again, many do live long lives, my mom's was over 15 when she passed.

    My next dog, before getting Quke, was supposed to be an IW.
     
  9. Freehold

    Freehold New Member

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    All giant breeds are heartbreak breeds. They just don't have the longevity, whether it is based from inbreeding, or from genetic issues that only crop up once you hit a certain mass/size, I really don't know. However, they do have unique and wonderful personalities that make their short life well worth enjoying.

    I've not had a Deerhound, but I do have the Wolfhounds. Yes, they have short lifespans. But there's just something special about them :) I dread the day when Renee passes, but I believe it just makes it more important to enjoy the good times while you have them. They are not a breed that should be taken for granted.
     
  10. Xandra

    Xandra Active Member

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    Have you thought about an American staghound? I don't really know much about them but they do the scruffy sighthound thing and I bet they're much healthier on average.
     
  11. yoko

    yoko New Member

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    Its kind of a bummer to hear all this. I've always wanted an IW but haven't been able to ok myself into getting a heartbreak breed :(
     
  12. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    This.

    I looked into deerhounds. For one, they're really hard to get unless you have an "in" with a breeder. Most of them go to other breeders/show homes/on contracts, so be prepared for that.

    They are definitely a heartbreak breed. Osteosarcoma is pretty rampant, among bloat and other things.

    I can recommend some breeders for you if you want to look into them further.

    In my experience they are mega super derps until they hit age 4 and then they magically transform into couchweights. You know, just in case the furniture starts drifting away or something. Most deerhound people get more deerhounds when that happens, because it's really easy to care for lazy blobs and they miss the derpyness. Plus at that point it's like a ticking clock down to their demise. :(

    Some staghound folks do have pretty hairy shags, or have straight up 50/50 deerhound/staghound crosses that are pretty hardy compared to purebred deerhounds. I would really really love one some day. Pops would be the person to talk to about them.

    Not all giant breeds are heartbreak breeds. Borzoi and greyhounds both have decent lifespans if you manage to avoid catastrophic stuff. I've met several 14-15 year old borzoi, and while they creaked a little they got around just as well as younger dogs did. Borzoi and greyhounds can bloat, they can both get osteo, but it's not nearly as common. I know a LOT of borzoi and have never personally met one that bloated, and only met one that got osteo. Both tend to run in lines, the breed has a much larger gene pool than the deerhounds so breeders are able to breed away from it much more easily.

    ETA: Master Splinter would be an acceptable name as well.

    Ha Ha, I made another funny.
    [​IMG]
     
  13. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    Thanks guys, I don't know a thing about staghounds, maybe I need a thread for them? Also borzoi?

    I need to think for a while (we have a long time) if the shorter life is something we would handle well or not. Arnold turned 8 on the 29th and it feels like we've had him forever but I'm not sure that means I'm ready for a life that short, especially when I look at Shamoo at 14 and the only thing slowing her down is a bad knee.
     
  14. HayleyMarie

    HayleyMarie Like a bat outa' hell

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    Wait your little Moo is 14?? Would of never guessed. She looks great and seems as mischeviouse as ever. <3
     
  15. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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  16. Catsi

    Catsi New Member

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    I have no experience either, but I'll watch this thread with interest because I do admire the breed - the scruffy hound just appeals. I would love to know more about their personalities/temperament.

    I personally couldn't own a heartbreak breed myself. This is just me - I have thought about it, but I tend to look at health/longevity as part of the priority package.

    I do know that the puppies look like kangaroo babies crossed with praying mantis... so adorable. :lol-sign:
     
  17. yoko

    yoko New Member

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    That's the one thing that's held me back. Yoshi turned 7 this year and I was sad enough about that. But she's going good and as long as nothing bad happens *knock on wood* I see her being around quite a while more.

    I have a hard time wrapping my head around hitting 7 and knowing the end isn't too far off.
     
  18. HayleyMarie

    HayleyMarie Like a bat outa' hell

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    Honestly having a dog that might not live as long as she is suppose to because of a health issue has made me realize that it's not as long as the dog lives, but making the best out of the time you have with the dog and giving the dog the best life possible.

    I most likely will own heartbreak breeds in the future and to me it will be worth it.
     
  19. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

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    American/Australian Stags are extremely healthy working bred sighthounds. they run the range from deeply linebred to first cross deerhound X greyhound. they can be smooth, broken or full WIRE coat. they can be found in every color & pattern except the spotted dalmatian pattern. brindles, yellows, blacks & piebalds in those colors are most common. the smallest i've heard of was a 50# bitch (a lot of track grey in her background). the largest was 36" & about 120#. most will be 80-110 # at 29-33". depending on how hard you run early on (1.5-4 yrs) they can still be taking game at 10 or 12. they have extremely high prey drive & pretty near zero recall once they start a run. eyesight is phenominal even at night they'll see stuff you & other dogs won't see in broad daylight. scenting ability is hit or miss but almost never better than hot nosed. injury caused wobblers occurs a bit but usually the type of injuries that could cause it are more catastrophic & usually fatal. in their older years (starting around 6-8) they have a low BS tolerance & even a bigger dog (lab, golden etc) could find itself getting choked out for pretending to start a fight. if they do wind up in a fight they are generally intent on killing what ever they are fighting (i know 3 larger dogs that have broken necks &/or backs on bulldogs & a heeler that jumped on them). so snotty little dogs need to be avoided like the plague. contrary to popular belief they are very trainable & can even be proofed on chickens. they can be very velcro couch potatoes when not hunting. i'd guestimate more than half the really good breeders won't sell them to a non hunting home.
     
  20. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

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    there are extra large & giant breeds that are as long lived as healthy medium & large breeds. the problems arise when you start from a small gene pool & narrow it further by focusing breeding on a very specific look or trait rather than a well rounded healthy dog. not sure how it happened to the deerhound other than an excessive focus on increasing & limiting height. w/ the Irish it stems from pretty much the whole breed stemming from Major Richardson's & Captain Graham's deerhound/dane line. both breeds would be well served by carefully controlled outcrosses to staghounds.
     

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