Rottie breeder selling adults. HUH?

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by Squishy22, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. vanillasugar

    vanillasugar just call me Nilly

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    A lot of breeds are late to mature, so the breeder won't know if the dog meets their expectations until it's almost two (or more in some breeds!)

    When Matt and I get our Newfie, I'm pretty sure it's going to be an adult that the breeder is re-homing, versus a puppy.

    I don't have a problem with it when a breeder is responsible about it! But there are people who do everything for the wrong reasons.
     
  2. blackmaskrott

    blackmaskrott New Member

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    One thing that needs to be understood here is the difference between the way we, here in the USA/Canada, view our animals and the way that most of the rest of the world views their animals. Breeding and showing quality dogs in other countries is a business and the dogs, themselves, are a commodity to be bought and sold to profit that business. There is no emotional ties involved, it is just 'business'. These dogs are kennel dogs only. They do not live in the owners home. It is my understanding that when pups are born they are left to the dam to raise until weaning, receiving very little human contact. As I understand it, when purchasing abroad, you have to specify that you want your puppy handled and "properly" socialized. They simply don't view dogs in the same way that we do. The only value the dogs have is how well they can benefit the kennel/business. I'm not saying that I agree, but it is the way it is.

    As far as the sale and shipping of pregnant bitches. The reason for this is that we are unable to ship semen OUT of Germany, at least that is my understanding of it, and this is a great opportunity to bring some of those desired German lines to the US.

    And yes, selling adults and shipping pregnant bitches abroad, is common. At least in rottweilers it is.
     
  3. pitbullpony

    pitbullpony BSL Can Be Beaten

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    Common in Rotties; and other SchH breeds as well

    for the same reasons that blackmask wrote; bringing a bloodline in from another country; if you visit the performance dog boards/forums; many, many people are importing adult, trained, half-trained, titled, pregnant, ready to stand stud dogs. GSD, Rottie and some Mals.

    I think the whole topic of foreign breeders and adult rehomes is interesting; I was recently talking to a South African Boerboel breeder who is thinking about letting me have one of her adolescent pups to raise and train. She imports from South Africa; and for the expense of importing a full-grown dog vs. a pup; she often has looked at mature females/stud dogs that are proven producers. From her perspective, importing a mature dog is very much about the socialization the dog has received before hand; and is said dog going to fit into her home; or is she getting a bundle of untrained aggression that is not going to be able to be handled when it arrives on N.A. soil.

    I couldn't do it; I couldn't bring an adult dog into my house that didn't have the same background as my house has; and I don't trust anyone that much.

    After my dog bite on Tuesday from a dog I was attempting to rehome; I'm going to be exercising GREAT care w/regards to any animal above the age of 6 mos. coming in; I've got 2 kids, a husband and a large hairy good dog that may not be able to handle the stress of an additional animal.

    I'm looking very closely at this potential new dog; but her breeder is a woman who does things the same way I do; and her household is very similar.

    I wouldn't take an adult Rottie; especially if it is a kennel dog as blackmask says. Too much liability as a family dog.
     
  4. blackmaskrott

    blackmaskrott New Member

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    This is exactly the point i was trying to make. Here in the US/Canada our dogs are part of our 'family', extensions of ourselves, pseudo-children, if you will.

    We don't have to like it, but I think we do need to except the fact that in most other parts of the world, dogs are no different than livestock. Well bred, well cared for, trained and bred to do the job that particular breed was intended for, but these are NOT pets. Not dissimilar to race horses. I own an ex-track horse and I guarantee you, even after being in my care since 1993, he is no pet. He is dead broke, but still not a pet.

    I'm not saying that I would raise an animal this way, but I'm not going to condemn someone who does, without knowing the whole story. Perspective and cultural differences exist and we need to except that.
     
  5. release the hounds

    release the hounds Active Member

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    I got my "real" start in dogs with an adult re-home. She was to be for a breeding program, but for medical reasons had to be spayed right at age 2. They kept her for 2 more years looking for the right home, I was originally looking for a puppy, but didn't have the time to dedicate to all the puppy stuff. They set me up with the older girl, already crate trained, housebroken, good with cats etc. I learned a lot from her and even got a couple titles. She had no trouble in the transition. I think a good environment is a good environment.

    Dogs adapt relatively easily, assuming the conditions are good.
     
  6. Rough_Collies2008

    Rough_Collies2008 Life's Rough

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    That is something I did not know, and now that I do...I completely agree with you.
     
  7. noludoru

    noludoru Bored Now.

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    Don't you all worry about miscarriages? From the stress of shipping... I could be WAY off base here, though, so if that's a stupid question feel free to tell me.
     
  8. HoundedByHounds

    HoundedByHounds Oh, it's *you*

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    That's a worry anytime you do a breeding...bitches fly to and from studs here in the states you know ;)

    The mere stress of being in the stud's yard could potentially take a girl out of season...but if my girls cannot carry puppies thru a nominal stress...or easily abort or resorb, I want to know that too. Repro vigor is an important thing that is easily lost now that we have so many "ways" to get girls pregnant.
     
  9. noludoru

    noludoru Bored Now.

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    That makes sense. And I did know about bitches being flown around to be bred before, and had wondered the same thing, actually, lol.

    Your answer made sense, though.. thanks Gina. :)
     
  10. Lizmo

    Lizmo Water Junkie

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    Erm, thats VERY normal in most breeds. Especially in Border Collies. Not everyone wants a pup or some want an already trained dog.

    But, most of the time if the dog is very close to his/her owner, they aren't going to sell. I know of a few breeders who have a dog or two that they are very close to and won't sell.

    The selling while pregnant thing is something I've never seen an ethical breeder do. So obviously I don't agree with that.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2008
  11. noludoru

    noludoru Bored Now.

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    Liz.. did you read the whole thread?
     

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