Rhodesian Ridgeback?

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by Lyzelle, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. Barbara!

    Barbara! New Member

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    As far as I know, they are not ideal American hunting dogs. They aren't soft mouthed enough for bird, and they are often lost when hunting game in the woods due to the fact that they are silent and only bay when they see their prey... Which means if they don't see their prey, you may lose your dog.
     
  2. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

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    nonsense.
    1. a great MANY pointers & setters and even retreivers are hardmouth until you correct it, RRs are no different & just as easily corrected
    2. LONG before the advent of tracking collars blackmouths & catahoulas & birddogs (ALL silent trackers) were running & catching fur. losing a dog usually involves the dog running game that beelines out of the country. dogs that don't have a track to run usually head back to the truck or stay under foot. also as the RR is not cold nosed like a hound but warm to hot nosed any track they will take is gonna put them on a critter close to you not over in the next county. running silent also means whatever they are tracking doesn't know it's being hunted until the RRs are biting them in the buttm which goes a LONG way toward making the race short. now if they are running coyotes or bobcat that beelines AND knows they are coming, yes they can wind up in the next county. or if for some reason they are soft & won't stop a hog in TX they can wind up in the next county. but most of what they'll get to run will stay within earshot most of the time.
    in fact as rural land gets more & more developed hot nosed, silent running dogs are gaining larger & larger followings and open mouth hounds are losing ground ESPECIALLY east of the mississippi river. BMCs, houlas, lacys, lurchers, airedales, JRTs, pats, feists and even RRs (and a variety of crosses like farm collieXbulldog & birddogXbulldog) are all growing in popularity as fur dogs because they run silent & don't take a cold, 3 day old track.
     
  3. Lyzelle

    Lyzelle New Member

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    You guys are killing me. And there's no breeders in Italy.

    I always thought they were harder dogs than what they seem to be. More aggressive, more temperamental. No idea why, but it's nice to know they are lovebugs and seem to get along very well.

    But seriously...killing me. In a cloudy, found new shortest list breed sort of way.
     
  4. Barbara!

    Barbara! New Member

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    I'm speaking for the breed as a whole and to their standard...what I said is certainly not nonsense.

    http://www.rrcus.org/club/breedinfo/RRFAQ.htm



    Someone asked if they were good for hunting. In general breed speaking, in America, no, they are not.
     
  5. Barbara!

    Barbara! New Member

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    They certainly can be. My RR for instance is VERY aggressive when someone is threatening me. He saved me from presumably getting mugged and he was not happy. Teeth, snarling, hair up...the whole nine yards. He also doesn't like other male dogs around his size. He is pretty DA with them.

    But they are big cuddle bugs as well. Depends on the breeder and the dog. I hope you can get one, one day. They're great!
     
  6. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    I have known a few, seemingly nice enough dogs but not my style.

    I have known a few people who hunt with them and crosses of them, they hunted coyotes and other small game.
     
  7. houlahoops

    houlahoops New Member

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    Just as an aside, we hunt closed dogs (like most 'Houlas) with radio collars or by keeping them in close (leashed or verbally under control) and they do just fine.
     
  8. Danefied

    Danefied New Member

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    I grew up with one in the early 80’s when we were living in Spain. I want to say he was bred in South Africa, but don’t remember for sure. We actually knew several ridgies in Spain, all great dogs.

    In any case, in a lifetime of dogs, he stands out as one of my all time favorites.
    This dog was SMART. Not biddable smart, but problem solver smart. This dog opened doors, undid latches, used his paws, his mouth, whatever. And he had a sense of humor. Seriously! He would ring the doorbell just to get us to go look.
    Gentle with us kids. Ferocious protective instinct, not dangerous at all though. He was great hanging out at the house, going to the barn, very steady dog. Wonderful temperament with other dogs, never started a thing, but could put an end to all the crap the terrier started with one or two moves. Amazing hunter - sight, scent, stalking, flushing... Very, very versatile.
    Health-wise, he did develop epilepsy around 6 or 7 maybe? We did get that under control with dietary changes, no meds. But then we lost him to bone cancer at 10.

    I’ve spent most of my adult life looking at ridgies here in America, and have yet to meet one that matches up to what I knew back then. The ones I see here are just not the same kind of dog. A lot of them are kind of shy more than aloof, kind of a “weedy†temperament. Less bone than I would like to see in a dog bred to hold lions at bay. Lots of bitchy looking males...

    Pops, Matt’s description sounds MUCH more like the dogs I remembered. Can you pm me his website or info?
     
  9. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    How much experience hunting them did the person writing the blurb have? America is pretty frickin huge with an enormous variety of game and terrain.

    A hunting style that works well on hogs in a Louisiana swamp is miles away from Colorado plains, coastal temperate rainforest, or Arizona low desert. For someone to definitively say that any breed isn't suited to hunting in America makes them sound inexperienced/ignorant (to clarify, I'm talking about the website statement, not you).
     
  10. Barbara!

    Barbara! New Member

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    It from the Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of the United States. I gave the link I quoted the text from.

    You can certainly say what a breed excels at and what a breed doesn't excel at, as a whole. Do you have those dogs that are different? Of course! Dogs are individuals. But you can also very much so speak in general terms for an entire breed as far as behavior. Not every dog will fit the description, but most should/will. For example, you can say that an American Pit Bull Terrier will have high prey drive, but no guarding instinct. Will that be true for every dog? No. But you can say that for the entire breed.

    Hope that makes sense.
     
  11. Danefied

    Danefied New Member

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    The breed was developed as a hunting and protection dog.

    Straight from the RR club of the US:
     
  12. Barbara!

    Barbara! New Member

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    Which is exactly where I got the quote I posted from.
     
  13. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    :rofl1:
     
  14. JessLough

    JessLough Love My Mutt

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    I'm not sure you're reading that quote correctly. Let me highlight the important part about hunting for you.

     
  15. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    And how many club officers are involved in hunting? People can write all they want about their breed, but if they don't have first hand experience or references from people who do, that doesn't make it accurate. And to say that a hunting dog, bred for hunting, isn't suitable for hunting on this continent despite all the different types of game and terrain is kind of weird. I could understand if it was about water retrieves or something contrary to their heritage, but it's not.
     
  16. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    I know a bounty hunter here (coyote and hog) and, while he doesn't run Ridgies (or any dogs), some of the hunters he knows and has worked with do. In his opinion they're very effective.
     
  17. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

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    I've met quite a few, but only one or two that I liked. Both females, incidentally, which is weird, because I normally prefer boy dogs.

    They were/are awesome dogs. Not clingy, but they carried themselves with, pride? dignity? I guess. One of them successfully defended her home from burglars, even after they threw a chiminea on her and crushed her hip. She's pretty old and stiff now. The other is around six or seven and she's a very cool dog. Bit nuts, but I'm pretty sure her owners don't do a lot of training with her or her brother, who is also a ridgie.

    I don't know any that are used on game though.
     
  18. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    I read that as "threw a chimera on her" :eek:
     
  19. CharlieDog

    CharlieDog Rude and Not Ginger

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    I have no idea how to spell that word. One of those little freestanding chimney things that were so popular a couple years ago lol
     
  20. Barbara!

    Barbara! New Member

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    No, I understood it perfectly and I reiterated what was said by the club that sets the standard for the breed. The very first line of that whole paragraph says... Yanno what, let me just get it again:

    Perhaps it is not you reading what I said and what it said correctly. I never once said that they can not hunt the game I stated. I said that per the breed standard and a Rhodesian Ridgeback true to that standard would not be suitable for that sort of hunting. That is exactly what this paragraph is stating as well. It is stating the RR (true to standard) is not SUITABLE for that type of hunting. Not that it can't. And I never said that it can't, either. Of course you have dogs that are the exception...another thing I tried to explain, but things must have gotten lost in translation. You can make general comments about a breed and a breed standard...but never once did I say that ALL RR's will be that way. The same way you can say that an American Pit Bull Terrier will not herd. This is true for the breed, but not necessarily for all individual dogs.

    That is the club that founded the breed in the United States after they came from overseas. I would definitely say that when it comes to the breed standard that they set, they know what they are talking about.

    Also, these dogs were bred for hunting, but not just general hunting. They were bred for tracking down and holding lion (big game), in a semi-open terrain, in packs, stalking silently and baying when the prey is found. They would often lose dogs. As said in the paragraph, most states do not allow this type of hunting with the type of game found in the US. The breed standard says these dogs are not suitable for this type of hunting, not that they can't...but that they are not suitable.

    I hope I cleared this up. Don't want to be misunderstood again.
     

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