Rate of tartar buildup after a dental?

Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by Saeleofu, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    Has anyone else noticed their dog getting MORE tartar buildup faster after a dental? Logan did not have much accumulation when he had his dental, he jsut needed a broken tooth pulled. We went ahead and did a scale and polish anyway, since he was out. But it seems ever since then, tartar just accumulates SO much faster.

    I used to scale Logan's teeth on occasion, maybe every 4-6 months. Now it seems I have to do it every couple weeks, and when I don't his breath REEKS.

    I've had this inkling before on other dogs, but since they weren't mine I didn't pay that much attention (I also noticed how bad the teeth look in general after many dentals). But now... :confused:
     
  2. sassafras

    sassafras mushinois

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    It depends on the dog. Some dogs need dental cleanings 1-2x in their whole lives, others could have 3 cleanings a year and be gross. I'm convinced there's a huge genetic component to it, and I think it also changes with age. All anecdotal experience, of course, but with pretty large numbers of dogs. I've never noticed a "breaking of the seal" effect so to speak.

    I don't know why, but pointy-nosed dogs - sighthounds, dachshunds, collies, shelties, and similar - seem to build up tartar like nobody's business. I don't know if it's something truly about the shape of the muzzle or if there's something about the saliva that's linked to having a pointy nose, but dang. I had a greyhound back in the day and no matter what I did or how diligent I was her mouth was a sewer. And of course toy breeds are notorious as well for dental problems.
     
  3. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

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    I wanted to say that after Rasza (my cat) had his first dental but the more I looked at it, it just built up to the same level and maintained (or so it looked like when I really, really looked). I am also a believe that dental health has a huge genetic component! Buzz has never had a dental... because he's honestly never had more than a tiny bit of accumulation on his canine teeth. Absolutely nothing. He lost an incisor a couple years ago and I just opted for the removal of that root because while his teeth weren't sparkly-just-cleaned-looking... they weren't in need of a cleaning!

    I'm interested to see how Rascal does after his dental. The clinic we went to has started "prescribing" a gel that you massage into the gums called EFAC (http://hopesciencevet.com/cat-perio-home/) that they've seen wonderful results with (a bonus is that it's also a joint health supplement because of the EFA oils). We were instructed to wait until after his recheck to start applying because he had so many sutures in his mouth.
     
  4. JacksonsMom

    JacksonsMom Active Member

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    I didn't really notice any faster.... but it's hard for me to tell. The first 3 years of Jackson's life, his teeth were barely brushed at ALL, so by that time, the dental was definitely needed. I mean, his teeth weren't HORRIBLE, but enough to suffice a dental. I've gotten much better about brushing so the tarter has not built up as fast, IMO, but I still think he may need a dental again this year. But I'm anal about his teeth, and while it's mainly only the front that has a bit of plaque, it's not the kind that's going to come off by just brushing, so I want them sparkling white again. Yorkies are prone to bad teeth anyway.

    Have you ever heard of OraVet? Next time, I'm doing it. I opted out last time because I did not know what it was. But I researched after and found out it's pretty amazing. There's a yorkie who had severe periodental disease and hasn't needed a dental in 4yrs. They apply it while their under, to get the teeth totally dry, and then you apply it once a week after that! I hear it's great.
     
  5. Dizzy

    Dizzy Sit! Good dog.

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    Not sure how it works... I don't brush bodhis teeth, she's 7 and has no build up. Nice pearly whites. She gets chews regularly?
     
  6. ~WelshStump~

    ~WelshStump~ New Member

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    Jinjo NEVER had build up on his teeth! Till...I took away his chews :(. Two folds, #1 that Enda was going to be coming into the picture so the year before (didn't exactly know how long it would take to get my puppy) I gave him his last, and #2 I started to really become concerned about the quality of products I was giving my dogs, well before that actually, I use to just buy whatever Raw hides and give them to Jinjo as long as it was a "name brand" company (gee, look where that got us what the chicken jerky ordeal?), needless to say I've learned better since his puppy hood and thus I cut out nearly all chews from the menu. Because of his food aggression issues I just didn't want to keep treats laying around knowing what he's capable of, but did plan to eventually put them back into his diet once I had everyone settle back in (which I have), but it was too late. Just one year without his chews, and it was over for his teeth, tartar build up covering most of his upper teeth behind the canines, and then it happened, he abscessed a tooth! He had a cleaning and polish, it was less than a year later I noticed he was building the tartar back up and it's now even with maintenance back to where it was before the tooth removal. His breath also stink horrid too, like rotten fish, but at this point I don't believe he can handle another round of dental work. Rock, and hard place.
     
  7. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    Yes, we recommend it for all our dental at work. I had the first "dose" applied, but didn't get any to pput on because he never had issues before. I'm considering starting, though.

    Well, duh! I think you two just figured it out! Since he broke his premolar on an antler - the reason for the dental - he hasn't had any chews to speak of. He used to chew on antlers all day long. Now - none. So, I think THAT is where the change is coming from. I haven't even given him his nylabone back yet. So, I think I need to get him more chews. Something not hard, but that his stomach can handle. Tracheas seemed to be okay for him, so there's a start, just don't know how much good a trachea does for teeth.

    THANK YOU for inadvertently pointing out the obvious!



    Logan ALWAYS had the most buildup on those big upper premolars. Now one of them's gone, but the tooth on the bottom that is now exposed is now getting some of the buildup where it never did before (and the same tooth on the other side doesn't have any). I think it's mouth shape. Food seems to get caught in that area - and Logan's breeder even warned me that food tends to get caught in that area. I've notice it in the other collies I've been around, too.
     
  8. Bigpoodleperson

    Bigpoodleperson Megan and Draco

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    If you are hand scaling the teeth alot then you are creating tiny grooves in the enamel that arnt being polished away. Tarter sticks to these easier and faster.
     
  9. monkeys23

    monkeys23 New Member

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    Oravet is awesome. I got it after my cat's dental and also used it on the dogs... make a difference without even giving them a cleaning. I have to admit... I no longer use it since going raw as eating real food does the job just fine.
     
  10. Barb04

    Barb04 Love my pets Staff Member

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    I'm using a cleaning gel. A friend who runs a rescue uses TropiClean Fresh Breath Clean Teeth Gel that you can get at Petco. She says it works the best. I just bought some to try after I use up the gel I have.

    Only the rescue lab we have needed her teeth cleaned since they were so bad, but we do notice they get dirtier faster. My other dogs don't have the same problem.
     
  11. JustaLilBitaLuck

    JustaLilBitaLuck New Member

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    We sell raw tracheas at my work - I'm sure they do much more for dental health than the dried ones! Plus, they're the same price and a lot bigger. I give them to Missy mostly frozen, and it takes her forever.
     
  12. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    This and it may just be more noticeable after a dental, clean slates look dirty faster than dusty ones.
     
  13. Grab

    Grab Active Member

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    I think it depends on the dog. Julian went almost a decade (pretty good for a Yorkie!) with sparkling teeth (he chews raw bones, etc) He accumulated tartar pretty quickly when we did do a dental and it was discovered the tiny llittle molar in the back was bad, so it was pulled. He's put on tartar quickly now. That could be due to age or something though

    However, I've hand scaled Aesop's teeth (canines) and his are still fine, although I did polish it afterwards. And Ginger's were fine after a dental. (her teeth are odd, though, as I have no idea what went on with her first owner, but all of her teeth are completely stained brown. It makes it look like she needs dental, when she in fact had a few dentals she probably didn't need.All staining.)

    Newt has genetically crappy teeth that accumulate tartar within months of a dental. We have just accepted that she is a once or twice a year dental dog.
     
  14. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    I wish I could find raw ones here!
     
  15. JustaLilBitaLuck

    JustaLilBitaLuck New Member

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    If you have any local pet food stores that carry raw products, I would give them a call and see if they can order some for you. We get ours from Green Tripe, but I'm sure there are other companies out there.
     
  16. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    Awesome, thanks! I'll have to see if I can get someone to order them in.
     
  17. Maliraptor

    Maliraptor Bite me.

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    Even if they're not hand scaled, you are depending on the skill of the technician polishing the teeth. A good polish job, and the dental appears to last longer. A crappy polishing job, and you'll see tartar build up much quicker.
     
  18. monkeys23

    monkeys23 New Member

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    I think the whole genetic predisposition thing is true... Lily's always had awesome teeth. Scout on the other hand, her teeth were nasty brown at 2yrs old on kibble... and they stayed that nasty on 50/50 pmr/kibble. But when I went full prey model raw with her? Bam, it looks like she had a dental. Crazy what a huge difference it made. I wish I'd taken before & after pics!
     
  19. BigDogBuford

    BigDogBuford New Member

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    This. And I've noticed dogs that have the 'anesthetic free' dentals get tarter build up waaaay faster than those that have a more thorough cleaning and polishing under anesthesia.

    Small dogs are more prone to dental disease than larger and some breeds are just more prone. Yorkies have terrible teeth for the most part.
     
  20. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    Logan was anesthetized - we had to remove a tooth was the only reason he had the dental at all. Can't really do that without anesthesia.

    He's also not a small dog - he's a collie.
     

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