Questions! Helpful puppy raising websites/resources?

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by Fran101, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    Anyone?

    I have lots of the supplies, training and health stuff.. but I am just freaking out about general like..raising!

    I've never had a puppy before! So I know to take them out a lot (socialization) but how much is too much? What ages is it ok to expose them to a lot? When are the fear periods and what should I do/watch out for? how much exercise is ok?

    lol any websites you found helpful?

    I am starting to kind of freak out haha
     
  2. stardogs

    stardogs Behavior Nerd

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  3. Toller_08

    Toller_08 Active Member

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    I can't think of any online resources off the top of my head right now (used to have a few bookmarked until my computer crashed), but my biggest advice to any prospective puppy owner is to enjoy them. I know I freaked out a little (ok, maybe a lot) wanting to do everything exactly right that I nearly forgot to just enjoy puppyhood (especially with Dance, but I almost did it again with Ripley) while it lasts. You're going to make mistakes, but puppies are very resilient, so don't be constantly afraid of ruining him/her because chances are you won't. I think my hugest resource that I learned far more from than a lot of books or websites can tell me was my breeder and other fellow dog people.

    I don't think there is such a thing as too much socialization. Kind of like with training, if the puppy looks mentally exhausted, I'd say it's time for a break. But overall I think it's pretty difficult to over socialize a puppy. I can't remember when the fear periods are, but I think one happens between 8-12 weeks and the other somewhere between 6 and 12 months. Some dogs seem to have another fear period after a year old, too. Things to watch out for include the puppy being more cautious than usual. To be honest, my dogs never went through a major fear period, but I noticed a little less confidence around certain things. And Ripley went through a period between 5 and 10 months where he'd scream if another dog he didn't know wanted to play with him. Just try to make sure all social interactions and experiences are positive and you should be fine. I started exposing my puppies to anything and everything possible as early as I could. Thankfully the Dobermans' breeder has a super busy household and so even before they came home they experienced a ton, but after I got them around 9 weeks or so, I exposed them to as much as possible pretty much right away I thinl (except for strange dogs until they were closer to about 12 weeks I think). Dance I didn't get at quite as young an age and her breeder didn't have a chance to get her used to a lot of things either, so socializing her was a much bigger challenge. But I took her as many places as possible pretty much as soon as I got her also.

    As far as exercise, no hard core fetch or running on pavement or anything for a little while, but I found my guys were fine with off leash exercise or playing with other dogs and would stop on their own or slow down when they had enough. Short (15min) leash walks were good too until they got older and could handle more.

    It's been a few years since I've had a puppy, and it's amazing all of the things already that I seem to have forgotten! It comes back quickly once I actually have a puppy, but to sit here and think about how I actually raised them is harder than I would have thought. They're so easy now compared to then, haha.
     
  4. CaliTerp07

    CaliTerp07 New Member

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  5. Greenmagick

    Greenmagick New Member

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    Definitely the before and after you get your puppy books linked above. Also Dr Sophia yin's Perfet Puppy is great (albeit an annoying title). I also really like puppy start right guide. It's a bit more technical and dry but awesome. I have not read it yet but would also add control unleashed for puppies.
     
  6. Dizzy

    Dizzy Sit! Good dog.

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    Never seen these books before. Fab :)
     
  7. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    There's this awesome forum called Chazhound... ;)
     
  8. MericoX

    MericoX Roos, Poos, & a Wog!

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    Have you asked your SD trainer?
     
  9. PWCorgi

    PWCorgi Priscilla Winifred Corgi

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    This is the trainer I've been telling you about:

    http://raisingk9.blogspot.com/

    I suggest reading through the tabs she has (Puppy Rules, Experiences, Socialization Ideas, etc.), there's some great stuff in there. Not all of it is original to her, but I like that it's all in one place!
     
  10. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    Wow this thread is back! lol thanks guys. And yes, he gave me materials to read that have since answered these questions but supplementing the classes/trainer advice with books and websites helped me a lot (and gave me something to do lol)

    So for anyone else looking for some help, KikoPups Website (Dogmantics) has proven to have lots of handy videos and also some other articles I thought were useful/interesting

    http://www.canismajor.com/dog/tpuppy.html

    http://www.dogmantics.com/Dogmantics/Free_Video_List.html

    and Sue A. 's training levels http://www.sue-eh.ca/page24/page26/page10/

    It is starting to feel a lot less nerve wrecking lol but still, I'm sure I'll freak out the closer I get haha
     
  11. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    Thanks! That site is awesome!!
     
  12. Linds

    Linds Twin 2

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    Ok, not a resource but I just wanted to say Fran, enjoy the puppyness.

    Sometimes it's so easy to get caught up in soicializing for this, exposing to this, training for this, "ohmygod the puppy is 4 months old and doesn't know how to stand!" that actually flat out bonding and just enjoying the dog can get pushed to the side. I'm not saying you will, I just pretty much wanted to put it out there. Everyone makes all these plans for what they are going to do with the puppy and this and that and to be honest, no puppy or person is going to live up to that.

    So I guess what I'm saying is to have fun, not stress over everything, take walks, try to expose the puppy to things through just being rather than structured socialization. I really think with dogs, especially quirky herding breeds you can get yourself in trouble by being too structured, too anal about things because they pick up on emotions or oddness so easily that it can backfire.

    For the first two years of Traveler's life we played. Yes, we trained and I did stuff but overall we just played, had fun and learned about each other and I think we're both better for it.

    Ok, lecture mode over and sorry for it!

    I haven't read it yet but Controlled Unleashed for Puppies is supposed to be awesome, don't know if it was suggested yet
     
  13. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

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    THIS. You've gotten great advice, so I just want to emphasize this. If the pup gets spooked, gets weird, decides someone/something is scary - DO NOT MAKE IT A "THING". Do not begin elaborate desensitization protocols. Just keep getting them out and about, make interactions casual and fun.

    Keeva went through a really noticeable fear period that she has just now come out of (so I'd say 7-10 mo) that was all about the environment. Big pet stores were scaaaaary, big, weird objects were scaaaaaary. I was all freaked out, and convinced she could never do agility because she would be afraid of the equipment. I went to some trusted people for advice, and Aleron told me, "Just don't be weird about it, she'll be fine."

    Well, last week we went a massive training club with 8 rings running at once inside a big, echoey fair grounds - a seriously intense environment. Keeva acted like she'd been there 1000 times. :rolleyes:

    But if you push them, if you make it a ritual that they have reason to be anxious about... You only solidify the scary. ;) Remember that herding breeds know what you're up to before you do, so you can't trick them into liking something - you only let them come to their own conclusions.

    Like Lindsey said, socialization is just about letting them figure it out. Set them up to have positive experiences and don't freak out if something goes a little haywire. And ENJOY YOUR PUPPY.
     
  14. Panzerotti

    Panzerotti New Member

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    Super duper advice!

    I made the too serious mistake with Panzer when she was young. We went training all over the place for FR, and I tried way too hard to work with her people issues. The FR people weren't used to pups like her, and while I give them credit for trying to help us, it was too much too fast and it made her worse.

    When I finally gave it all up I did no training for a few weeks and just let her be a pup with no expectations. When we went back to training with a "just for fun" attitude it was way better and more fun for both of us!
     
  15. FG167

    FG167 New Member

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    This is what I did with Kastle (Eden I got as a young adult). Well, actually, we trained every day almost, sometimes twice a day - but it was all play to him. Lots of food (his breakfast and dinner) and treats and toys. He chased me and jumped up and spun around and barked - that's how I taught him a recall, his release word and how to get into basic position - he has no idea that was "training". I do the same thing with my young adult Corgi, all fun and games and she learns faster and faster each time. With my GSD, I am starting his SchH training so I did add some pressure as he got older and I knew he could handle it, but when he was young it was alllll fun. He's going through a brain-idiot stage right now so I'm back to fun-fun stuff to keep him animated and *with* me instead of fighting for his focus. I also did a lot of body awareness stuff which I find puppies are usually really stimulated by and gives them confidence - teaches them to be powerful and agile. If you click Kastle's name (or Eden's for adult stuff), you can go back to when I first got him in his blog and see the sorts of things we did. All fun :)

    I've heard WONDERFUL things about that book too. I have the original and just got the puppy version - dying to read it before my new pup comes home...

    Another excellent post and I whole-heartedly agree! :D
     
  16. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    Mia was a pretty rough pup. She chewed a lot, was really really loud and had some interesting quirks come up. I am just now starting to realize that Mia's all grown up and is a pretty easy dog these days.

    Mia had a couple fear periods and one period where she decided that she should obsessively chase her tail that I stressed a little about. She grew out of them and is a very well rounded dog now. My basic puppy raising method is just to have fun and let the dog be a dog all the while teaching the dog what you want from them in a fun way. Less about strict regimens and more about letting the dog have plenty of guidance and direction and experience.

    I definitely agree about keeping things casual and fun. I have never read a puppy book or done anything super serious with a pup before and so far so good.

    I still am a little scared thinking of the next pup, but in the end, I love raising puppies. It's so much fun.
     

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