question about walking...

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by toothless, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. toothless

    toothless New Member

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    my black lab is 6 mo. old today! anyway, i've been having some trouble walking him. he understands the 'heel' position while walking or standing, but when walking (both on and off leash), i've got to remind him every 5 seconds. if there is nothing happening, he walks perfectly at my side. but if he picks up a scent or there's a noise in the distance, he starts speeding up . constantly. are there any specific training methods or techniques you guys would recommend to keep him focused on me and where he is in relation to me, regardless of what else might be going on? do you suppose the regular walk/jog has gotten too boring? thanks for any input.
     
  2. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    You need to build up distraction training gradually. Each new situation is a different exercise for the dog, so in each setting the training pretty much starts over.

    After enough different situations, he'll begin to generalize and he'll be able to heel under a variety of distractions.
     
  3. toothless

    toothless New Member

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    thanks. so if i just keep this up, he'll eventually get the general point? or should i concentrate on specific types of situations?
     
  4. Boxer100

    Boxer100 New Member

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    Every time he starts pulling, stop and let him know it is not OK by you. Do this a few dozen times and he will understand that you will not walk with him if he pulls you. You can also shorten the leash so that he is always close to your side. He might be trying to see if he can take over the alpha role and start leading you. This happens with puppies before they fully mature. It can happen a few times before they reach the age of 2 years.
     
  5. corgipower

    corgipower Tweleve Enthusiest

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    Well, what is it you're doing exactly? Start with low level distractions and work up to higher level distractions. Start with just getting his attention. Then work on keeping attention while walking.

    Use treats and toys, play with him, make yourself more interesting than his environment.

    Yeah, see, dogs don't try to take over an alpha role with people.
     
  6. MafiaPrincess

    MafiaPrincess Obvious trollsare Obvious

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    WTF. :popcorn:
     
  7. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    :rofl1::rofl1::rofl1::rofl1:

    thanks for the laugh.. just got back from emerg for the third time in 3 days.. it was good to have a chuckle!
     
  8. Boxer100

    Boxer100 New Member

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    "A pup of six months will still challenge you and other members of the family for the top dog position."

    Please read this after you eat your popcorn: http://www.give-a-dog-a-name.com/puppy-developmental-stages.html
    There are many reputable articles online about this (that one was the 1st one I found) that talk about it. And please, bring more of your expert friends over. It makes it more fun since they like to gang up and attack like sharks sensing blood on anything someone says that doesn't have above 1,000 posts. Pretty pathetic.
     
  9. iwantmypup

    iwantmypup New Member

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  10. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    Yes and it has been disproven soo many times its not funny.

    There are articles out there and people who still believe the earth is flat too...

    And even if you do buy into the whole dogs are wolves and would form cohesive groups that only mate within the group etc etc... the dominant wolf does not always lead.

    Dogs walk in front and pull cause we teach them too.

    Puppy is excited to go for walks.. walks are exciting.

    Humans walk slow in comparison to canines. So pup walks fast to see new things and ends up pulling.

    Now pup is small owner barely notices pulling. But lets look at what happens...

    Pup pulles, pup gets to go where he is pulling too. The fun walk continues.

    The pup does not know that the walk would continue even if he didn't pull. Over the course of a few walks the pup has learned that pulling 'works'. He is constantly being rewarded for pulling.

    Then the pup gets bigger and the pulling becomes noticeable and eventually a pain. Then someone comes on and says that dogs pull because they are trying to dominate you :rolleyes:

    Dogs aren't out to rule the house. They do what they are trained to do. If you reward them for behaviours you don't want.. well its not the dog's fault.. and its not the dog trying to dominate you.
     
  11. AllieMackie

    AllieMackie Wookie Collie

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    Posting one link that says that a dog will challenge you for alpha doesn't make it correct. I can also post links that contradict your link. Look!

    http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/2001/dominance.htm

    Oh wait, doesn't Cesar Milan teach the "be the alpha dog" theory? I hear people aren't too fond of his methods lately. Because, y'know. They don't work except on edited television shows.

    You can search this very forum for all sorts of info on that, so I won't bother with links. Links are silly. Anyone can post a link that proves anything. That's the magic of the internet! "THIS IS TRUE LOOK A WEBSITE THAT PROVES IT" etc.
     
  12. MafiaPrincess

    MafiaPrincess Obvious trollsare Obvious

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    Has nothing to do with post count, and everything to do with typing absolutely moronic things and being rude.

    Dogs do what works. If you let a dog pull they start to think that pulling is what gets them from point A to B. It's taught, it's not a matter of being an alpha anything.

    So yes, I sure will go back to my popcorn and watch you continue to be rude to other member and write assine things like cropping causes dogs to be anxious and vicious. You continue to write bad advice, you probably will feel ganged up on. Use google for good.. not for evil.
     
  13. iwantmypup

    iwantmypup New Member

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    I've been attacked and I am over 1,000..

    Rofl rofl rofl :p
     
  14. MericoX

    MericoX Roos, Poos, & a Wog!

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    <watches as sharks start to circle>

    And if you shove a dog's head underwater... it'll no longer dig in your yard.
     
  15. Boxer100

    Boxer100 New Member

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    You must have done something really bad, like killed someone. :rofl1:
     
  16. AllieMackie

    AllieMackie Wookie Collie

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    This is fantastic. Because, uh... as of this post, you have more posts than me. But I am a respected and valued member of this community. And I sure don't kiss ass, I voice my opinion when I feel it's merited.

    At what point will you finally realize that you are causing your own problem?
     
  17. iwantmypup

    iwantmypup New Member

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    Geesh! Who do you think I am?? :p
     
  18. eddieq

    eddieq Silence! I ban you! Staff Member

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    Xena pulls. She can pull a tank out of the mud, I think. It's not because she's trying to be dominant with me. If she was trying that, there would be other behaviors akin to that. She simply likes to pull on the leash because it gets her what she wants. I'm working on it with her. Yanking her leash or punishing the pulling in some way does not work. What does work is rewarding the good behavior. I've seen it with her. She doesn't pull nearly as much when I walk her now even when I'm not carrying treats. Eventually it will sink in, I'm sure of it.
     
  19. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    I agree with the others - start with fewer distractions and build the distraction level gradually.... And increase your rate of reinforcement when the dog is in a very distracting environment (he does not have to walk as nicely or walk nicely for as long to earn a reward). If he does get out of position, I find inside turns effective - make a 180 or 360 degree turn around with your dog on the inside of the circle. This way while you're both turning, his vision is blocked by you.... Usually this gets their attention back to you.
     
  20. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    It is easy to see when people teach pups or dogs to pull, just watch anyone that doesn't have much understanding or knowledge and they often have a strangle hold on their pup. Absolutely it is a learned behaviour.
    What is interesting is how people with knowledge and ultra aware hands can take any puppy and that pup will never pull on leash.
    Also take that person with the knowledge and skill and watch them take a pulling dog and within minutes WITHOUT corrections, have that dog in a loose leash heel with distractions and WITHOUT holding a treat on the end of the dog's nose..........interesting.

    To the OP, since this has gotten off topic a little bit, one thing that is important is to not let the pup forge forward, stop them before they get that far out. Bring them back, nicely and then when they are walking on a loose leash (that doesn't mean you hold the leash at the end, loose but able to take up the slack when needed) reward. I don't reward after I have to bring them back to me, but when they are walking nicely.
    You have to train yourself to be ultra aware of your leash, one fun and good method is to have a friend or family member hold the other end of the leash. Each play the part of a pulling dog/pup, learn to become aware when the slack of the leash is STARTING to be tightened, not when it is tight. This includes, forward, bearing out and lagging behind.

    Good luck and I hope that helps.
     

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