Proofing the Recall (re: Culture Clash)

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by cJw314, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. cJw314

    cJw314 Vicarious Owner

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    Greets!

    So I've finished Culture Clash, and was curious about the application of the "college level recall" section in the book, which basically talks about proofing recall by interrupting a retrieve with the "Come!" cue.

    This felt rather... counterproductive to me, although I couldn't quite place why. So, I'm turning to the "pros" (flattery will get me... anywhere?) to see if it's something you've tried yourselves.

    If not, do you think it's a good practice? Obviously, what works for you, the animal, and your end goal is what you'll theoretically use, but...
     
  2. adojrts

    adojrts New Member

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    Think of it this way, you throw ball and you throw farther than you intended.........it bounces and goes across the road. At that point you need to be able to redirect the dog to come back to you, regardless of whether you had sent them to go get that ball in the first place.

    Although not as serious as the above example, in agility handlers often make the mistake of sending their dog towards the wrong obstacle and we have to call them again (before they do it) and redirect them.
     
  3. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    It also sets your dog to come back under distraction. Ie your dog gets out and sees a squirrel and takes off after it, you want your dog to come back even though he is 'busy' doing a 'job'.
     
  4. cJw314

    cJw314 Vicarious Owner

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    Point taken... and I don't doubt the requirement of a rock solid recall - certainly more important than "fetch", but I thought Donaldson presented more-so as a way to proof recall, not so much as to practice breaking a retrieve for an emergency recall.

    Hrm.
     
  5. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    Basically proofing your recall is a way to proof your recall. And you aren't really 'breaking' fetch. Just changing your mind :)
     
  6. Maura

    Maura New Member

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    My dog works sheep- talk about distraction! He has to come back to me or be redirected at any point of his stalking/herding behavior. And, yes, his training has saved his life.
     
  7. Criosphynx

    Criosphynx New Member

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    I agree with the others, its simply proofing....the dog is obeying the most recent cue you gave....which is what you want. I use it to call them off balls, other dogs, and critters. :) very useful (and impressive depending on who is watching ;) )



    btw you ask really good questions...keep them coming :)
     
  8. cJw314

    cJw314 Vicarious Owner

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    Thanks for the assurance, all - I understand how it's simply training and not necessarily going to hurt the retrieve cue/behavior.

    @Criosphynx: Be careful what you wish for - lol! : )
     
  9. lizzybeth727

    lizzybeth727 New Member

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    Right. Now, if you've been working a lot trying to get your dog to retrieve, and he's just figured out the cue, practicing interrupting that behavior - which he's not very sure of - with the recall could hurt your retrieve. But if you're just "playing fetch," and your dog is very good at fetching the ball or whatever, that's a great time to work the recall.
     

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