Please Neuter

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by Richie12345, Aug 25, 2005.

  1. ruffiangirl

    ruffiangirl New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,681
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    5
    Location:
    Fort McMurray, AB, CA
    I would need know what that clinic charges for a neuter as well. A spay here starts at $650, neuter starts at $500, but everything here is crazy.
     
  2. crazedACD

    crazedACD Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Too Many
    Location:
    West Missouri
    :eek:

    I had Romeo neutered by my vet (a regular veterinary office, not 'lost-cost' or a clinic), I still have the bill somewhere, I think it was $170 including a microchip. So, $140 or so for a 50# neuter.

    Things are a little more expensive up here but I know for a 90lb Collie spay the pricey vet quoted around $350-400.
     
  3. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

    Joined:
    May 31, 2012
    Messages:
    4,168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    2
    Location:
    Gillett/Flower Mound TX
    Yeah I about floored when someone said $400 for a spay/neuter. There are some vets who are that pricy but around here the country vet will do a neuter for about $150 & a spay for about $250. There are also many low cost clinics that charge based on income & will even do it for free in some cases
     
  4. Ziva

    Ziva New Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've been doing some research in preparation for the dog I'm hoping to get within the next year or two, and after all the weighing of pros and cons, I've decided that if I can just find a vet that does the procedure, I would get a tubal ligation done on my dog.

    The idea that one should remove organs that provide numerous benefits to the body aside from size, just because one could maybe get cancer there one day has never sat well with me. With humans, women don't usually get hysterectomies in fear of cancer. In fact, I've read some studies that link cancer and disrupted hormone production as a result of such procedures.

    From all the studies and articles I've been reading, it seems that while a traditional spay/neuter eliminates the possibility of certain diseases such as testicular and ovarian cancer, it actually increases the risk of other cancers such as bone cancer, and other ailments which have a far higher incidence rate.


    Anyone know of any vets that preform the procedure? The internet has failed me in this search- has only brought up a handful of dog/cat related articles and then the rest were all pertaining to humans. In "Pukka's Promise" by Ted Kerasote, the author reported that most vets don't learn the procedure because they aren't usually taught it in school.
     
  5. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    2,115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    1 dog, 1 guinea pig, 1 hamster, 1 American toad, 1
    Location:
    Illinois
    You may want to consider an OSS instead of a tubal, though of course it's up to you. The ovary-sparing spay preserves hormone function and heat cycles, but the dog is sterile and also can't get pyometra. I ultimately decided against the tubal because of the risk of pyometra.
     
  6. Ziva

    Ziva New Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I considered it, and maybe I have to do some more reading on the matter, but on my part I didn't find much information on how prevalent pyometra really is in un-neutered dogs. I found a lot of anecdotal stuff, but other than that.... I'm also still trying to figure out if there is any documentation on whether or not the removal of just the uterus could have an adverse effect on a dog's health.

    It's so great that you had a vet who was willing to discuss the procedure with you! None of the vets in my area would even hold the conversation with me about it.
     
  7. ruffiangirl

    ruffiangirl New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,681
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    5
    Location:
    Fort McMurray, AB, CA
    Oh that's the price at the cheaper clinics, the one clinic quoted me $650 to neuter Gage...4 years ago!
    But where I live a single family dwelling (average house) is about $750,000 http://www.woodbuffalo.net/linksFACTSHome.html
    That tells a bit about where I live, except the massive half ton dully part, cause you don't buy those off the lot, lol, you have to build them.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/03/05/income-gap-oilsands-fort-mcmurray_n_1321666.html
     
  8. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Messages:
    9,036
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Some vets here will do neuters for under $200, but there's no blood work, no monitoring, injectable anesthetics instead of gas (so no intubation), no IV fluids, and often no pre-operative, intra-operative, or post-operative pain meds.
     
  9. sillysally

    sillysally Obey the Toad.

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2008
    Messages:
    5,074
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 dogs, 2 cats, 2 birds, and 1 horse
    Location:
    A hole in the bottom of the sea.
    I honestly don't remember what Jacks neuter cost, but then that was 5 years ago.

    What are thoughts on the age to spay females? Should you wait for at least one heat?
     
  10. stardogs

    stardogs Behavior Nerd

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    4,925
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    2 dogs, 1 cat
    Location:
    NC
    Home Page:
    I'm using a repro vet for my girl's OSS. The studies I've read indicate that 25% of females will end up with pyo by 10yo and because closed pyo can be so subtle until it's almost too late, that's not something I'd want to risk. In some breeds the study I read indicated up to 40% of females would have pyo by 10yo.

    On the topic of price, the repro vet I'm using charges $350 for a traditional spay with human grade anesthesia, full monitoring, etc. and $400 for an OSS with the same anesthesia, monitoring, etc. My regular vet would charge about $200 for the traditional spay, typical gas anesthesia, limited monitoring, etc. Low cost clinics here charge $75 iirc.
     
  11. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Messages:
    7,061
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    2 dogs (and 3 half dogs and a half cat)
    Location:
    Mississippi
    That's how we do cat neuters (only we do a PCV/TP and do give a pain injection upon recovery). I think that totals out to being between $100-200.
    We typically don't give our dog neuters fluids, but they do get bloodwork, intubated, monitored, pain meds, etc. I think a cost for a dog neuter is around $200, depending on the size of the dog.

    Spays here are upper $200-300, depending on the size. They get everything a neuter gets, plus fluids.

    The "low cost" places around here do cat neuters/spays for $20/$40, and dog neuters/spays for $90/$120.
     
  12. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Messages:
    30,965
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    a lot
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Home Page:
    To me this whole idea is kind of strange... people say that spaying/neutering CAUSES bad behavior changes but then doesn't cause good ones?

    We've had a lot of intact dogs over the years. All but one has been fine when it comes to marking and humping. Beau on the other hand... was not fine. He humped and marked EVERYTHING no matter what we did and finally neutering him at 6 did decrease his desire to hump and mark everything. Not entirely but significantly decreased it to a rate that was livable and workable. So I definitely think that if you have a dog that has some severe issues with humping and marking then neutering might be a good option. I've talked to other people that have had similar experiences. I do think there are some (not all) male dogs that have a much much higher propensity to inappropriately mark and hump. Nard is still intact and he's fine.
     
  13. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Messages:
    7,061
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    2 dogs (and 3 half dogs and a half cat)
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Yup. Cooper was intact when we got him (at two years), and he had a marking problem. Neutered him = no more marking problem.

    My sister's dog, Wayne, obsessively humps every dog he meets. He starts off social, then I see a switch flip in his brain, and it is just like he is acting purely on instinct. I'm hoping neutering him will stop this problem as well.

    I've also fostered three adult intact male dogs, and none of them had marking/humping issue.

    Future-Puppy will be left intact unless he develops a behavior problem due to it. Then he'll be neutered.
     
  14. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    2,115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    1 dog, 1 guinea pig, 1 hamster, 1 American toad, 1
    Location:
    Illinois
    I have seen neutering improve persistent marking and humping problems in adult dogs.

    However, I cringe when I hear the "I won't do it unless he blah blah blah" about puppies because so, so, SO many boys go through phases during adolescent when they experiment with marking the house, act like douchebags with other males, and mount compulsively, but like human teenagers they grow out of it. Neutering can reduce those behaviors but so often, so does time and consistent training.
     
  15. Southpaw

    Southpaw orange iguanas.

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2005
    Messages:
    7,788
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    7
    Location:
    Minnesota
    We had someone come in last week with some sort of yorkie mix puppy. 10 weeks old. The owner wants to neuter him NOW. Because the "breeder" said she should do it before he's 16 weeks old. :rolleyes: And the owner wants to do it early so that the dog NEVER lifts his leg. NEVER.

    Thankfully the vet was like, uh no, I am not neutering your 10 week old, 2 pound puppy.


    I don't really care when/if/how people spay/neuter their dogs, I just wish people were more informed about their decisions. This goes for BOTH people who choose to have it done on 6 month old puppies, and people who choose to wait. More often than not they're only coming to these decisions simply because someone else told them to do it that way.
     
  16. SpringerLover

    SpringerLover Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    3,415
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    fiver
    Location:
    B-ville
    Home Page:
    We worked with a yorkie breeder who neutered ALL of her boy puppies before they went home (so right around 12 weeks if I remember correctly). She said it drastically reduce the amount of returns she got. I don't really have an opinion on it I guess.
     
  17. Emily

    Emily Rollin' with my bitches

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    2,115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    1 dog, 1 guinea pig, 1 hamster, 1 American toad, 1
    Location:
    Illinois
    Yeah I've heard of that before in small dogs specifically. I guess because they tend to be pretty persistent markers?

    I don't know nothin' about it except that personally I'd do belly bands for like 3 years before neutering at 16 weeks, LOL, but honestly, I could see doing it for pet owners. No point in waiting to neuter for health reasons if no one wants to keep the dog, lol.
     
  18. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Messages:
    9,036
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36

    :hail: :hail: :hail:
     
  19. crazedACD

    crazedACD Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Too Many
    Location:
    West Missouri
    Soldier isn't neutered and he is the only male in the house that will very occasionally mark, and usually only when the little dog goes into heat. I have a belly band for him now, it works fine.


    (And the little dog is in a split heat right now... :doh:)
     
  20. Dogdragoness

    Dogdragoness Happy Spring!!!!

    Joined:
    May 31, 2012
    Messages:
    4,168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    2
    Location:
    Gillett/Flower Mound TX
    Bear never humped or marked anything (in the house, anything outside was fair game lol) & he wasn't neutered til about 6 years of age, he need roamed or tried to escape, even when we lived in the city. Buddy I believe was neutered late when he came to rescue & he does hump other dogs during play & also scratches/marks (outside only but will mark inside if I don't watch him)
     

Share This Page