On- vs off-lead

Discussion in 'Dog Training Forum' started by Rubylove, Nov 13, 2005.

  1. rocco&quiras mama

    rocco&quiras mama New Member

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    i´m not bashing any1..
    I just think there are kinder ways of doing it..
    making the dog listen cuz it´s having fun, not cuz it´s scared.

    I´m not saying it´s always easy.. my dog Rocco is almost two and still has a long way to go . Quira is almost 1 and has been trained with the same methods and is very well behaved.
     
  2. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    I think it's important to get a very good recall first by keeping the dog on a long line and training it using motivation/reward methods. If you give a command to come and can't do anything about it and the dog doesn't come, you're in trouble right there. Never give a command you can't enforce. Make it extremely worth it to the dog to come every time. All dogs need to eat. Food is a good motivator, especially when it's something very extra yummy on an empty tummy. LOL.

    When your dog has a very solid recall, first in low distraction areas, then gradually increasing the distraction level until he's coming in the midst of a lot of different distractions (safe)....then let him off leash in a safe place....never where he can get hit by a car or where other dogs are. Dogs can run a long distance in a heartbeat. No dog is 100% reliable, even the very best trained ones. They have drives, instincts and some situation that could come up, that sometimes override their training. Good recall training doesn't happen over night. It takes lots and lots and lots (did I say lots?) of practice along with the dog's maturity.

    Don't forget to praise your pup everytime he comes around you, even if you didn't call him. Make games and fun when teaching him to come....run the other way, entice him, play hide and seek and give him a treat when he finds you. Never punish him for something else when he comes and don't stop all the fun right after he comes. If you're outside and need to go in, if he comes, go inside and continue with another game for a little while. That way he doesn't learn to avoid coming to you because the fun is over. If you call him to come to put the leash on him, walk around for a few steps and release him again. Make sure to end training sessions on a good note and show him that coming to you is the best thing in the whole universe and that it doesn't mean it's the end of a fun time.

    If I ONLY walked my Doberman on a leash, in order for him to get enough exercise, I'd have to walk from north Idaho clear to Miami. Thankfully, I live in a wilderness area where there are loads of safe places for us to hike and for him to run, including my own property. But if you don't have this and a park works for you, that's an idea, although I'm not a big fan of dog parks.

    Hope these tips help.
     
  3. rocco&quiras mama

    rocco&quiras mama New Member

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    ´
    great tips !!:)
     
  4. CanadianK9

    CanadianK9 Active Member

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    Wanna know the reality of the situation, train and proof on leash, train and proof off leash in controlled situations, and then you can choose to your preference.
     
  5. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    If a dog is proofed on a leash, that does not say that he will be proofed off leash. A dog is quite aware of when they're not on a leash and so off leash needs to be "proofed" in it's own right. Of course, "proofed" in this case is hard to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt. LOL.

    My Dobe has a terrific recall when off leash. He's come when chasing deer. When chasing a dog who came in our pasture, he halted and dropped when I hollered out to him from about 200 feet away. He comes when called always when we're out on a hike. If he goes off the trail very far, I say, "trail" and he zooms right back on it. I've taught all three dogs what trail means. I never have a problem calling him to come...........all except for a few weeks ago. He was chasing a bear off the property. He ignored me. My Chihuahua did the same thing last summer and ignored me. A dog can be soooooo good and then one time, one thing causes them to focus sooooo hard, that they simply don't hear you. Prey drive in all wheel drive.
     
  6. bubbatd

    bubbatd Moderator

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    Most of these comments were about dogs and I agree.... but this is still a pup ! A pup should always be on a leash unless in a confined area at least until they have been well schooled and come with obedient calls when you ask.
     
  7. AndrewF

    AndrewF MIiA

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    I'm a firm believer in having your dog trained off leash....at least to a point where they 'come' reliably. The reason I believe so strongly in this is if your leash becomes unclipped from the collar or if you accidentally drop the leash. Both of these have happened to me and it's because I worked with Jake off-leash in a suitable area before-hand which allowed for him to come when I called him to me. And to stress this point, the time his leash came unclipped, we were crossing a road (that leash has since been chucked). If memory servers me correctly, he was only 4 or 5 months old at the time.

    I'll also go a step farther and say teach them as soon as you can. I started Jake when he was about 3 months old in a tennis court on a retractable leash, then off leash with the gates closed, then in a leash-free park. In the end, it's all about his safety for me.
     
  8. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Abslutely. It takes lots of time and maturing before you get to that time when it is appropriate to work off leash. If you start too soon and the dog is not ready, has not been proofed for quite some time on a long line, you'll not get the reliability. Same with anything. A pup has to get really, really good at a skill in an area free of distractions before trying in highter distractions. A stay has to get good for a very short time before you work up to a longer stay. It's all about baby steps and not rushing ahead before the dog has mastered a previous stage.
     
  9. Dizzy

    Dizzy Sit! Good dog.

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    Depends on the dog...

    We used to go hill walking with our dog (years ago now). She was fine, no problems. I would never walk along a street with her off the lead.

    I see dogs ALL the time walking off the lead in town. Some are expert at it, ignore all passers by, sit at the kerbside etc. Some are no good at it at all!!

    I really believe you can not decide on other people opinions. It depends on your dogs. I fully intend to let Bodhi off lead in the park/countryside/beach. Of course, we need some training first - she hasn't been out yet!
     
  10. Brattina88

    Brattina88 Active Member

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    Even though I have spent countless hours (in small increments) training Maddie it never ceases to amaze me when she actually listens. Its incredible to watch a dog, 110% focused on chasing a squirrel, turkey, whatever, turn completely around with the sound of one or two words!
    In My Opinion (!) Regardless of whether or not anyone intends to walk/let their dog off leash** I think it needs to be taught, just in case... Just in case one day something happens... Because you never know

    **And if you do, owners eyes must be diligent watching for possible distracters. Its easier to call out a "Leave it" before the dog is focused than to get the dogs attention back on you for a recall in a dire situation :)
     
  11. Sirius

    Sirius Imagination ROCKS.

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    I have seen people training their puppies in a dog park offleash and then when they don't listen punish them. HELLO?!?! This is a dog[i/] park. Key word there being dog. Too many distractions. Harley is still a little boy, and I train him in the backyard using Sam as an example. Whenever we are walking, Sam's attention is on me. Then when I say, "Okay!" she can go do her dog thing. If I say, "Sam, Come!" WHAM! Back to me. Harley is a different story. But anyways, I am getting off topic. Training off leash is fine... In a contained area !! Like, in your fenced backyard. Not in the middle of the road. Like I have seen some people... Jeez.
     
  12. Dixie

    Dixie The ***** idiot

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    My lab is 9 mos old and we have succesfully completed OB. Again on the e-collar in the wrong hands it is a torture device, in the right hands it is a excellent training tool. When I nic him it is for less than a second, just enough to get his attention. Now that he has been collar conditioned, he will only need one quick nic as reminder of what I expect. Again this is usually just enough to get his attention not to cause major pain.

    He gets fun and games as well, I play with him, rub his belly, and throw him plenty of fun bumpers because its his favorite game. He also has a basketball to play with in his pen when Im not around.

    I love my dog, but I expect compliance from him 110% of the time, just as you would with your children.

    -Dix
     
  13. rocco&quiras mama

    rocco&quiras mama New Member

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    dixie..

    I don´t doubt that you love your dog.
    Just expressing my view on the matter.

    And if you play with him all the time anyways why not inc that with the training.
     
  14. Dixie

    Dixie The ***** idiot

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    He's able to differentiate between playtime and worktime and I like to keep it that way for when we do these tests.

    Also I might add that everytime he learns a new concept I praise him like he's won the grand. So its not like everytime we are out training he only gets corrections, he gets lots of praise as well so he knows when hes done something right.

    Im glad you expressed your views, that is what the discussion board is for, I like hearing everyones personal views on training, its what makes this world go round and round.

    -Dix
     

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