Not vomiting with peroxide?

Discussion in 'Dog Health Care' started by skKi, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. skKi

    skKi woop

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    Pit got into something he shouldn't have this morning and so I gave him a dose hydrogen peroxide when I got to work to make him vomit it up. 20 minutes later, nadam so I gave him more. Nothing, so I gave him more. NOTHING. Over an hour later and what I'm assuming is bordering on a dangerous amount of peroxide, he is happy as a clam and not vomiting at all.

    What to do? Vet?
     
  2. elegy

    elegy overdogged

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    if it's something that he really needs to vomit, then yes, vet. although at an hour out, i'm not sure how much good it will do. your vet should be able to tell you.

    some dogs just don't puke with peroxide.
     
  3. Corky/Max

    Corky/Max New Member

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    This is off the net: Frequently, dogs ingest items, chemicals or foods that have the potential to be dangerous or even toxic. If you see this ingestion, you may be able to avoid the potential danger by making your dog vomit.

    Inducing vomiting should be done only if instructed by your veterinarian. The procedure can be hazardous. We strongly encourage you to contact your family veterinarian or local veterinary emergency center for advice regarding the appropriateness of inducing vomiting for each specific incident. The item or substance ingested, the time and amount of ingestion, as well as the overall health of your dog should be considered prior to recommending the induction of vomiting.

    Methods to Induce Vomiting



    Hydrogen Peroxide

    Three percent hydrogen peroxide is quite effective in making dogs and cats vomit. You must be sure to use three percent peroxide and not hair coloring strength peroxide.Despite the label indicating that hydrogen peroxide is toxic, it is safe to give to dogs for this purpose. It is considered toxic since it induces vomiting and therefore does not stay in the body.Yikes--But your baby did not vomit!!??

    The appropriate dose of hydrogen peroxide is one teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight. If you have an oral syringe, one teaspoon equals 5 cc or 5 ml. Once given, walk your dog around or gently shake the stomach area to mix the peroxide with the stomach contents. Vomiting should occur within 15 to 20 minutes. If no vomiting occurs, you can safely repeat the three percent hydrogen peroxide once. If it is still not effective, your dog may need to be seen by a veterinarian for stronger vomiting medication.

    Once the hydrogen peroxide is given, it is important to watch your pet so that he does not re-ingest the substance. If there is concern about toxicity, collect and take a sample of the vomitus to your veterinarian.


    There are many more sites to click on ---I put: dogs/giving proxide in my browser.
     
  4. skKi

    skKi woop

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    I ended up calling my vet since she's notoriously good about giving advice over the phone. Considering the size of plastic he ate and his size, she says it will likely pass on its own and to just monitor for any problems very closely.

    She said the same thing as you, Elegy. Some dogs just don't puke with peroxide, and I guess Pit is one of them!
     
  5. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    What did he get into? What did he act like right afterwards?
     
  6. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Oh, I was typing my post while you must have been posting your last one. LOL.

    Oh yeah....plastic. Well, it is probably safer to see if it will pass out the other end than risking having him vomit and re-ingest, aspirate it or choke on it. Good luck. I bet he'll be fine. Rotten dogs! My dogs have gotten into their fair share of things they shouldn't eat. I think most dogs have. It can be dangerous but I think considering how much this happens where everything comes out okay, (pun intended) they are probably pretty well built to handle some bad stuff.
     
  7. skKi

    skKi woop

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    He ate one of those blood absorbing packets you find at the bottom of ground beef packages. Immediately after doing it, he scurried away from me because I was shrieking at him then proceeded to happily lie down and lick his chops as though he just ate a fine breakfast. He's been acting completely normal since, even after all the peroxide.

    EDIT: Apparently I did the same thing as you. :rofl1:

    It's been forever since Pit has done anything like this! Last time I remember being worried about him eating something was rubber bands when he was a wee puppy. He would eat rubber bands like spaghetti.
     
  8. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Oh yeah, those delicious, bloody meat packet liners. Yum.

    Here's a really good informational article about what to do with suspected or known ingestion of various things by dogs:

    http://www.chazhound.com/forums/t90517/
     
  9. Corky/Max

    Corky/Max New Member

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    You just brought back memories (Lol, not saying they are the best, but--) from when I was a child living on a dairy farm and this was before they quit using strainer pads to strain the milk going into milk cans. I was only about 6-7 yrs old and I can remember my dad (Now why would he do that--darn!) even throwing the soaked with milk used pads to the collie and the dog gulping them down. They must of all come out the other end but I do remember, ugh, some of them 'hanging' half way out the other end and being a little harder to get rid of. I don't think it was a very smart thing for my dad to let the dog have but just saying it is somewhat like these meat pads--prob meat pads a little worse though because of the 'plastic' in it.
     
  10. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Eeewwwwww! LOL.
     
  11. Saeleofu

    Saeleofu Active Member

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    My vet gives Apomorphine in the conjunctival sac to induce vomiting. I've never seen it fail. It is, however, a controlled substance.
     
  12. skKi

    skKi woop

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    Which begs the question, what DO I give him if I need to induce vomiting on my own?
     
  13. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    Did you read that link I posted?
     
  14. skKi

    skKi woop

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    I did read it, but I didn't catch the answer to my question. I may have overlooked it...
     
  15. Doberluv

    Doberluv Active Member

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    It says to keep the animal poison control phone number handy and to contact a professional before giving anything to your pet. It describes what kinds of things are poison and when to call poison control and what kinds of things (examples) are beyond poison control's expertise and when to call a vet. Some animals have had seizures and died from certain home remedies. They would tell you what amounts to give and whether it is safe to induce vomitting at all....depending on what the animal ingested. Some things are caustic and can cause damage if they come back up when vomiting. They like to know if you know how much of something the animal probably got into. Lots of variables and so it's prudent to consult with a professional before giving anything to a pet. I think the whole article is very informative and wise.
     
  16. JennSLK

    JennSLK F150 and a .30-06

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    Salt. Give him about a table spoon, or 2 and it may work. I used 1 table spoon with the doberman and up came the entire box of chocolate turtles she ate. :rolleyes:
     
  17. Zoom

    Zoom Twin 2.0

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    It really does depend! Sawyer does well vomiting with HP, so did Virgo. I tried the salt thing with her when she ate all those coffee grounds, but it didnt' do anything.

    And APC charges you for calling them. :mad:
     
  18. Corky/Max

    Corky/Max New Member

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    Too Much Salt Is Also Poison--What if Dog Doesn't Throw it UP!!!!

    This is a copy of something I had put in a thread in another forum. Mainly bringing it because of what is stated about salt being poison but it is all good info.
    If your pet is showing signs of ingesting a poison, it is important that your vet examines her and treats appropriately. Some toxins can progress and lead to severe seizures. If you suspect ANTIFREEZE POISONING,it must be treated within 4-6 hrs., before irreversible kidney damage occurs.
    PURGE THE POISON. In most cases of poisoning, getting your pet to vomit is the most important thing that you can do . DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING if something caustic has been consumed (such as drain cleaner or bleach). To induce vomiting, give hydrogen peroxide at 1 teaspoon per 10# of body weight. If your pet doesn't vomit in 10 mins., repeat again. NEVER do more than 2 treatments of peroxide. This following part is about the salt: You can also try salt: dilute 1 teaspoon of salt in a tablespoon of water per every 10# of body weight. (Now cautious me thinks this is a lot of salt AND TOO MUCH SALT IS POISON TO YOUR DOG TOO!!---that would be 2 tablespoons of salt for a 60# dog--Don't remember how much salt CAN EVEN BE FATAL but don't think it is a whole lot---I WOULD DEFINITELY FIND OUT BEFORE I WOULD GIVE THAT MUCH SALT--maybe because it is expected to be thrown-up that it wouldn't hurt but I for one would have to find out 1st about it!!!--SOUNDS PRETTY IFFY FOR ME!!And that is what worries me the worst---IF THE DOG DOESN"T THROW IT UP!!!!!
    NEUTRALIZE THE TOXIN.If a caustic substance has been ingested, DO NOT INDUCE VOMITTING, rather give something to neutralize it. An alkaline toxin such as drain cleaner is neutralized by something acidic such as vinegar-give 1 teaspoon per 10# of body weight. An acidic toxin, such as battery acid, is best neutralized with something alkaline such as Milk of Magnesia-give 1 teaspoon per 10# of body weight.
    DELAY ABSORPTION.Activated charcoal is readily available at most pharmacies. It delays absorption of any toxin by binding to the toxic compound in the stomach. The easiest way is to give the capsule form. For those garbage-eating dogs it is a good idea to have hydrogen peroxide and activated charcoal always on hand!
    TOPICAL TOXINS.If your pet is having a reaction to something on the skin, such as FLEA MEDICATIONS. or oil on the skin, then you want to remove it as soon as possible. DISH SOAP works well-lather it up, then rinse your pet thoroughly. Thick tarry substances that you can't wash off can be first covered in flour, as the flour absorbs some of the oil, then washed off with the dish soap.
     
  19. JennSLK

    JennSLK F150 and a .30-06

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    I doupt a tablespoon of salt would hurt. But I guess my vet doesnt know anything. :rolleyes:
     

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