Non-shedding or longhaired breeds

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by noludoru, May 16, 2013.

  1. chaospony

    chaospony New Member

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    Sending you a PM Noludoru. There is a wonderful rescue in your area.
     
  2. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    Bouv, or mayyyyybe a Black Russian Terrier, but those are getting into pretty guardy breeds.

    A briard?

    Rescue doodle?!?

    Although, I agree with Dizzy. If they're health tested and proven dogs from a responsible breeder, I don't think it's awful to buy a 'doodle" mix...especially a labradoodle. They were bred to fill a niche. If you didn't want to go through a breed, you could always look into getting a washout guide dog - I'm not sure if the guide dog associations ever place pups in pet homes without giving them a shot at training (or if you're looking for a puppy).

    The aussies I've known have shed pretty heavily (and not all of them were 50 lbs +). The dobes I've known have not been heavy/bothersome shedders at all, if they're fed a decent diet and bathed 3 times a year.

    Also: the doodles that shed badly are the ones with the fluffiest coats. The wirey or curlier coated ones don't typically shed much, but the ones with the soft, wavy coats usually do.
     
  3. Mina

    Mina BRT - "the black watch"

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    Both gr8 breeds, milos, but,
    general appearances aside,
    there's a world of difference in
    personality, temperament and drives
    between them ... very, very different!

    Oh, and as far as being "guardy" is concerned,
    unless you're looking into solely working lines,
    they're worlds apart.
     
  4. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    I've met many many many goldendoodles through work and right now my suggestions would be one of them but from the RIGHT breeder. (one that can provide a wealth of owners of their pups who are happy with their dogs)

    I have seen doodles go very very right and on the other hand... ughhh
     
  5. Aleron

    Aleron New Member

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    If Doodles appeal to you the most, get a Doodle.

    PWDs really do sound like a potential match but they can definitely be loud. A large male can be right about at your minimum. The biggest male I know weighs I think 75lbs.
     
  6. CaliTerp07

    CaliTerp07 New Member

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    I am following this thread with interest. Your wish list is my wish list (except I want a dog a fraction of the size: 20-30 pounds is perfect to me.) I really lucked out with Lucy, she has the absolute perfect coat. Long, soft, fluffy, and while she sheds it's always in "clumps". I find dust bunnies of hair in the corners, behind the sofa, or after she rolls around on the carpet, but she can lay in my lap and I can pet her for hours and not have a single hair in my hand.
     
  7. Xandra

    Xandra Active Member

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    Nice goldendoodles are super adorable
    (e.g. [​IMG]), and like mentioned you can find respectable breeds nowadays. I bet they're pretty pricey though, and the few I've met aren't what I'd call sharp at all. A young adult breeder rehome might be good, so you know the temp and coat beforehand.
     
  8. ruffiangirl

    ruffiangirl New Member

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    Oh thanks for your post, Bouvs and Standard Poodles are the two breeds I am highly considering for NextDog, when we loose Gage. I am leaning more towards Bouvs because its way easier to find breeders that work their lines.
     
  9. noludoru

    noludoru Bored Now.

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    In CO now. :(

    An Affie is an awesome idea, and I haven't ruled out them or Zois. It's just a lot of money to pay for a dog that I'm not 100% sold on. I'm fine with the grooming requirements - every two weeks is already what I prefer. I realize that baths and grooming will take more time with an Affie than they do with Middie, but I have all the tools.

    I think the Afghans have the temperament I truly love.. the cat-titude. . . the "**** you, the world revolves around me" kind of attitude. I love that. It's why I love Rumor so much. :rofl1:

    Maybe. I don't want a puppy, though - puppies are a PITA and I don't know how big they are, what coat type they'll have, or how they will mature. I can deal with a young adult if I have to, but an adult from rescue is ideal. I'd take a puppy if it were the right situation and the right breeder, but it is NOT what I am looking for.

    That's part of my hesitation about a rarer breed. . . very hard to find that way. And hard to find an adult breeder rehome.

    Aussies definitely shed, but I can deal with the shedding. Long hair is easy for me to manage and clean up. Barking I can't deal with. Middie has almost completely stopped barking now that we're not living with Marley, and if I have to go back to barkbarkbark at any point in the future I will kill the dog or myself.

    All the ones I met were 45lbs. Middie-sized. I didn't know they came that big. LOVED them but they seemed kind of doofy and sweet.

    When I find one I will shrink it and send you the clone. :rofl1:

    Lucy's coat is amazing, though. I completely agree. I would take a Lucy coat.

    True. I have seen HORRIFYING doodle coats. Yet another reason I lean towards an adult.

    THANK YOU. I am so glad I'm not the only one who feels that way! The texture freaks me out.

    And as to the doodles, well, if I could find a good breeder I'd consider it, but I want an adult.

    I don't need a dog who will bite, though. Alert barking is fine. I just want a dog with a sharper temperament in general - something that matches mine. Not Belgian or Fila sharp..
     
  10. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    If you're going for an adult rescue, I'd look into a goldendoodle or labradoodle in rescue. They're incredibly plentiful, and compared to most "designer dogs" have few health issues.

    Also, IME labradoodles can be quite sharp. Not like a dobe, but way more so than most labs. the goldendoodles...not so much.
     
  11. LostAndConfused

    LostAndConfused Active Member

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    English Shepherd?
    Similar coat to an aussie, but I think the ES has 'less'. Their coats just tend to be less poofy. You can also find larger males. The breeder I got Hudson from prefers her males to be 65+. Hudson isn't super barky either, like when he gets excited playing fetch, or tug, or whatever, his default response is not to bark. He was just barking at a runner going by the house, but he stopped as soon as she was out of sight.
     
  12. Mina

    Mina BRT - "the black watch"

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    Wow ...
    it's rare to find someone for whom
    both the S.Poodle and Bouvier are appealing!?! :)

    I've also, always liked the S.Poodles "on paper,"
    and really thought we'd eventually get one.

    I took a long, long, hard look at the breed,
    researched them quite extensively,
    and even managed to find a good breeder
    (not easy to do, especially with Poodles!).

    But, once I got past that impressively long list of health issues:

    1) I realized that, in all these years,
    I've never come across even one, single individual
    whose temperament and personality I actually liked,

    2) Although aesthetics are far down on our list of priorities,
    both of us still have a real problem with the appearance ...
    and this, regardless of the hair style.

    3) And finally, after taking care of a friend's Standard for a week who,
    she had proclaimed, was "almost human" in its intelligence :rofl1:
    ("intelligence" is, indeed, relative :D) ) ...

    I finally came to realize that, "three strikes and yer out" ...
    For us, a Poodle will never happen.
    Occasionally, I've recommended the breed to others,
    and it might be a good choice for the OP, but not for us.

     
  13. YodelDogs

    YodelDogs New Member

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    Have you considered a Basenji? There is almost no grooming involved, they have no odor, and shedding is barely noticable.

    You will never be able to go to the bathroom alone again.

    Basenjis are energizer bunnies.

    Well socialized Basenjis are very friendly to people but many grow up to be less demonstrative to strangers.

    No barking but not neccesarily quiet all the time either.

    Basenjis can be complicated dogs to live with at times but I can't imagine my life without hem.
     
  14. ruffiangirl

    ruffiangirl New Member

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    I love the softness of the poodle, and the sharpness of the Bouvs! I would even consider owning one of each at the same time, I think they could compliment each other, at least for my family.

    And now back to your regularly scheduled thread...sorry for the hijack!
     
  15. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    Just wondering what your "Velcro dog" experience with basenjis is? I've definitely never heard them described like that. I've always known them to be a fairly independent breed, on the primitive side of the more popular pet breeds. The ones I've worked with haven't seen very Velcro at all, but I didn't spend much time with them at home. They were never overly affectionate with me or their owners, at least not while I was around.

    They also don't reach 65 lbs.
     
  16. AdrianneIsabel

    AdrianneIsabel Glutton for Crazy

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    I believe she breeds and shows them?
     
  17. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    I know she's had a lot of experience with the breed in general, I'm just wondering what she means by describing them as a "Velcro dogs" and exactly how affectionate or attached her dogs are.
     
  18. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    You need a zoi. :p

    Velcroness is an individual dog thing. Strider isn't velcro. Kaia. Oh my gosh. I can't even go into the showgrounds when she's going to be shown or she can smell me and it totally messes her up in the ring because she's just standing their air scenting and looking around frantically. Her dad is the same way with his people.

    The only other drawback is the shedding. If you have a spayed female or an intact or neutered male it shouldn't be a big issue. They have no undercoat and long silky hair. Yeah there's some shedding, but it behaves like human hair and vacuums up easily.

    Mine almost never get brushed except as a bonding activity. :eek: They don't really need it. Once every few weeks. They don't have a doggy odor. Strider only smells if he has an allergic reaction. I can actually smell when he has fleas because of it. Usually if they get wet they'll just smell like whatever shampoo you used on them last.
     
  19. YodelDogs

    YodelDogs New Member

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    I'm sorry for the delayed response. I don't visit here as often as I used to. In the past, it was common for Basenjis to be aloof, independent, and sharp tempered but breeders have done an excellent job in turning this around. A well-bred, well-socialized Basenji is eager to meet everyone. Many adults will retain this attitude at maturity but others will choose to be affectionate with their owners but selective towards strangers.

    There is a wide range of personalities within the Basenji breed. As far as Velcro, it is not unusual for rescues to have separation anxiety. They want to be with their owners constantly and won't let you out of their sight, indoors or out. ("They stick to you like Velcro.") A well-socialized, properly exercised adult will want to lay on or next to you on the couch and sleep in bed with you. They follow you around the house because they are curious about what you are doing. Not really "Velcro" but very companionable. Outdoors is a different story. Use a leash, period.



    I did not see that in the first post and missed it later in the thread. Sorry about that. Basenjis are only about 20-25 pounds so that boots them out. ;)
     
  20. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    Thanks for the response! That's good to know. The basenjis I've known (only a handful) have all been very aloof with strangers, and not particularly affectionate towards their owners, but I don't know how they acted typically in the home.

    They're definitely becoming quite popular city dogs, and I think were much more rare 10+ years ago, so it does make sense they're being bred to be more pet-like.
     

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