Neutering a stud dog

Discussion in 'The Breeding Ground' started by Gallien Jacks, Mar 6, 2006.

  1. Gallien Jacks

    Gallien Jacks New Member

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    what are your thoughts on neutering a dog you used as a stud, once you have decided that he has sired his last litter and you just want to keep him now as a healthy pet? Do you neuter because its will take away the risk of testicular cancer, of keep him intact?
     
  2. Gempress

    Gempress Walks into Mordor

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    I would neuter to keep him healthy. I know many breeders spay/neuter their retired dogs.
     
  3. Gallien Jacks

    Gallien Jacks New Member

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    Yep thats what i did with Barney, i wanted him to live a long and healthy life, and saw no need to keep him intact, but I was talking to a guy the other day and he said that it shouldnt be done a male dog is never the same, I am having probs with barney he is changing, he is less cuddly than he was, and i was told of a dog that went nasty after neutering at a old age
     
  4. I don't leave any dogs intact that I do not plan to use for breeding.
     
  5. Gallien Jacks

    Gallien Jacks New Member

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    Thanks so I did the wright thing then?
     
  6. IliamnasQuest

    IliamnasQuest Loves off-leash training!

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    Neutering is not the wrong thing. The advantage to neutering (regardless of age) is that it not only removes the possibility of testicular cancer but it greatly lessens any problems with the prostate.

    Intact males often get enlarged prostates - sometimes just from smelling a bitch in heat somewhere down the road. When I worked as a vet tech, it wasn't unusual to have a dog brought in for urinating blood and it was often due to an enlarged prostate. It doesn't seem quite fair to me to leave these dogs in a state of arousal when neutering is relatively safe and simple.

    I saw hundreds of adult dogs neutered and I don't remember many complaints about them changing. Taking away the hormones may take away the urge to roam and may make them more likely to lay around the house (and therefore put on weight) but an owner can regulate that by making sure they get their dog out and exercised daily.

    I neutered my male shepherd between the ages of 3 and 4 and it didn't change him. He went on to earn a Utility Dog title and was a very active dog.

    Melanie and the gang in Alaska
     
  7. FoxyWench

    FoxyWench Salty Sea Dog

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    ive never heard of any responsible breeder leaving a retired dog intact...
    in my opinion once the stud (or bitch) is retired, then he/she shoudl also be "fixed" ive never met a male that whent nasty just because he was neutered late...
    i have met a male who was nasty before neutering, the owner assumed it was just because he was intact, then he was neutered at 7 years old and got nastier, and he assumed it was because of the neuter...what he didnt see was it was because the dog was nasty in the first place and didnt recive any disaplin or training...
     
  8. Gallien Jacks

    Gallien Jacks New Member

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    thanks, I think Barney is just mad st me for having another boy in the house so he is upset with me so i dotn get many cuddles, hubby gets them instead
     
  9. Amstaffer

    Amstaffer New Member

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    My vet said there are Pros and cons to neutering a male. She said that you avoid some problems but run into other problems in your dogs health. I was thinking about neutering Sal but she said there is no health benefits. Does anyone know of a study that shows that neutered males live longer? If it will add a couple of years to Sals life....I'll have him neutered. I had one of my male Rotts neutered when he was about 7 years old on the advise of another vet and he (Bear) had a tough time with it. It seemed to affect his health for a long time.
     
  10. shepluvr

    shepluvr New Member

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    I personally have never seen a dog adversly affected by neutering, and I have been in the animal buisness for a while. No matter what age. I do not profess to know what happens to every dog in the world who is neutered, but I have seen quite a few....with only positive results. Now, ask me how many problems I have seen with un neutered males. different story.
     
  11. joce

    joce Active Member

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    The latest study actually shows unaltered dogs live longer. But I think it has to do with when the dog is altered. If its done young I jsut don;t think they grow 100% correctly and bone cancer is like thirty times mroe common in altered dogs. But once a dog is so old I don;t think it affects it as much.
     
  12. My bitch died of bone cancer and she was spayed at 3+ years old.

    Bone and other cancers are all too common in older dogs whether they were altered early or not.

    For me, the benefits of altering pet dogs outweigh the risks.
     
  13. Gallien Jacks

    Gallien Jacks New Member

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    Well a neutered dog cant get testicular cancer I would say thats a health benefit
     
  14. wildwings811

    wildwings811 a.k.a: agilitydobemom

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    We always neuter/ spay any dogs that we do not intend to breed or that we are done breeding I think it was a wise decision :)
     
  15. Gallien Jacks

    Gallien Jacks New Member

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  16. rottnpagan

    rottnpagan Rottweiler Queen

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    Sorry to pop into this late in the game... but I've this article linked that may be interesting to some. :)

    Neutering and bone cancers.
     
  17. Amstaffer

    Amstaffer New Member

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    Very interesting! And scary....My Athena was spayed at 5 1/2 months.

    Thanks for the info
     
  18. Gallien Jacks

    Gallien Jacks New Member

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    Thanks ye4p I remember reading something like that before, but there will always be a for and againat side to spaying? neutering, bone cancer or uterine cancer what a choice huh
     

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