Need help with fetch command

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by Rayna 3, Jan 10, 2006.

  1. Rayna 3

    Rayna 3 New Member

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    Hello all, I'll be starting my boys on the fetch command soon and wanted to know how you guys do this. When they go get the object you've tossed and they bring it back, how do you get the dog to drop it? I had one dog in the past that wouldn't drop the object and when I tried to get it he thought I was playing and it turned into a tug of war game for him. Not sure how to proceed......
     
  2. calibra

    calibra New Member

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    Hi

    I am no expert as I am only just teaching my GSP to fetch.

    So when the dog brings the toy, I say drop and she'll drop it --> To do this, I had a treat in my hand. When she see the treat, and drops the ball I say drop. In the end she learned the word drop.

    Not sure if that's the correct way.

    I have issues with the dog bringing me items which I will post later in another thread.

    James
     
  3. Fran27

    Fran27 New Member

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    Definitely teach 'drop it'. On a side note, I've never got my golden to drop the thing either, I just go the other way and usually he drops it then.
     
  4. Julie

    Julie Are You Blowing Me Off?

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    Pick a "release" command... I say "out" with my labs. When the dog returns the object to you, (My dogs sit and then release) say "the word" and don't pull on the object, instead push the object gently towards the back of the dogs mouth, the dog should try to open his mouth and then you can take the object out. Of course always praise after the release. (You might need to put one hand gently on the back of his head to keep him from backing away.)

    My dogs have learned the "out" command and are very reliable, of course they do retrieve ducks and geese, so it is a very neccesary command, although I very rarely have to even say it anymore.

    Best of luck.
     
  5. CanadianK9

    CanadianK9 Active Member

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    When the dog comes back with the toy or object just offer a treat for dropping it or giving it to you, you can attach whatever command you want to it.
     
  6. Rayna 3

    Rayna 3 New Member

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    Ok, thanks. Those were some great ideas :) I will definitely give them a try. I wanted to be prepared before I started this command. I'll be starting it soon and I'll keep y'all posted. Thanks again for the help!
     
  7. I love a play retrieve, it's a lot of fun to play with the dogs that way, but I start all over when I begin to teach a formal retreive for the ring.

    The first thing I do is teach the dog to hold the dumb bell, or sometimes I use a piece of doweling.

    I want the dog to learn to hold the object firmly, right behind the canines, without rolling or mouthing it.

    The first step is open the dog's mouth manually, insert the object where it needs to be held as I say, in a sweet praise tone of voice, TAKE IT!, and hold the dogs mouth shut gently, as I say HOLD IT in the same praise tone. Count 3, and release the dog's mouth, remove the object, as I say "GIVE", or OUT.

    I try to work this exercise 21 times per day. 7 times in the morning, 7 times mid day, and 7 times in the evening. All the time keeping it positive, brisk, up beat, with lots of praise and rewards. I want the dog to be EXCITED about the object and this training, so I work hard to keep it light and fun.

    At the end of the first week, most dogs are beginning to reach for the object as I bring it towards the mouth, and are holding without any assistance, and releasing well.

    Next I work for the dog to move TOWARDS the object to take it. All behaviors that are close to anything moving towards the object are praised and rewarded. By the end of the second week, the dog should be jumping towards the object and happily taking it to hold it.

    When the dog gets to this point, I introduce some heeling while carrying the object. The dog gets one "strike", in other words, one "free" dropping of the object. I indicate slight verbal displeasure when this happens, and replace the object. If the dog drops it again, he gets an ear pinch until the object is back in his mouth. I do not introduce this mild version of a forced hold until the dog has made it very clear to me that he understands he is to hold the object.

    MOst dogs will get one or 2 mild ear pinches, and they understand that they MUST hold the object.

    ONce the dog will JUMP towards the object, hold it happily and reliably, and heel without dropping it, we move on to picking the object up from the floor.

    This is done ON LEASH. Up until this point I have been holding the object at or above eye level for the dog to jump up to get it. Now I gradually begin lowering the object until I am holding it on the floor for the dog to pick up. This is a BIG STEP for most dogs in learning the retrieve process. You must not rush it. First move your hand slightly away from the object, and then further, all the while encouraging the dog. ONce the dog will grab from the floor, you just add distance.

    :D
     
  8. Rayna 3

    Rayna 3 New Member

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    Man, you guys are on the ball. I would never have thought of some of these things! Thanks for sharing your ideas :) With all this new information I can't wait to start the new command. Wish me luck!
     
  9. Rayna 3

    Rayna 3 New Member

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    Hey guys, I've now started my boys on the fetch/retrieve command. I've been trying Red's method by first teaching the dog to hold an item. I had a small broom handle that I cut into slightly smaller pieces so it would fit the dogs mouth a bit better -- they each way 9 1/2 lbs now :). Anyway, I've only been working on this for 1 day, but I already see that the pup doesn't want to hold it and keeps trying to chew it.

    Here's what I do:

    I get him in a sit - give treat

    I take the handle up to the dogs mouth and say 'hold' -- at this point he sniffs for a second and then turns his head away.

    I open the dogs mouth while saying hold and try to keep the handle in there for 3 seconds -- lot's of praise while saying hold repeatedly -- he keeps trying to chew on it though.

    Then I say 'drop' and let him drop it -- lot's of praise and then a treat.

    I repeat this 5-7 times and they are on leash the whole time.

    Any thoughts? Thanks in advance.
     
  10. Rayna 3

    Rayna 3 New Member

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    I meant to add that I also have to hold on to the pup on the floor as he wants to squirm and get up the whole time. It was the only way I could think of to keep him still. That may not matter, but thought I should mention it. Thanks again.
     
  11. Your puppies are still very small, but you can still teach the hold.

    1) Do not give the puppy a choice, or a chance to turn his head away. Open the mouth, put the dowel in, SMILE!!!!, rub, praise, help him hold it for a count of THREE, then remove it with a flourish, praise and treat.

    2) you probably need a MUCH smaller dowel for puppies the age of yours. Something about the size of your finger.

    3) smear the dowel with Cheez Whiz or Peanut butter, and while you are teaching ithe hold, encourage the pup to also play retrieve and chase the dowel.

    4) take one of their favorite toys, tie a string to it, and drag it along and encourage them to chase it. Praise praise praise if they pick it up.

    5) remember these are PUPPIES, so keep it fun, but firm, upbeat, keep smiling and stay happy when you are training.

    6) Train in VERY short sessions. No more than 5 minutes for the "hold it" lesson, and end with something light and fun.

    7) Encourage tugging games. If the pup will chase an object, encourage this, and encourage him to come back so you can play the tug game. This one thing has really helped me to firm up the play retrieve and helps the dog enjoy the game.

    8) NEVER EVER REACH FOR WHAT THE PUPPY HAS PICKED UP. NEVER EVER. This will teach the puppy that you are only out to spoil his game. Play trade for treats, play tug, play trade for another toy, or use upward collar pressure to help the puppy drop his prize. NO REACHING OUT for it whatsoever.

    :D
     
  12. Rayna 3

    Rayna 3 New Member

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    That was awesome advice Red!! Thanks as always. I will adjust my method and try again tonight! I guess maybe I need something smaller for them to 'hold' as well. I really liked the idea of tying a string to their toy!! Wish me luck and I'll keep everyone posted :D
     

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