Mixed Breeds?

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by CrystalGSD, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. CrystalGSD

    CrystalGSD Member

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    Okay, I know you guys are probably getting annoyed by all the breed suggestions posts I'm making. I'm not being annoying on purpose, I'm just unnaturally curious. I promise you all that I will stop with the posts soon enough. :p

    So, I narrowed down my breed to the German Shepherd. Which was pretty obvious, honestly, but then I saw people getting dogs from the shelter. And getting mixed breeds. And getting dogs that were saved from terrible conditions that made me feel pity for the poor puppies.

    What do you guys think of getting a mix breed? It would be a puppy, definitely, but I am now having trouble choosing between getting a purebred or a mutt. Especially considering the fact I may do flyball (or agility, really can't choose...). By mix breed, I mean the generic pick up from the pound dog, or the typical craigslist dog. A dog which has unknown lineage and you have no idea who the parents are. All of my previous dogs have been mixes, and I loved them all, dearly. But, I also want a purebred dog. I wish this choice was 10x easier...

    Help. I'm indecisive. Purebred GSD or mix breed? :confused:
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  2. CaliTerp07

    CaliTerp07 New Member

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    I do agility with my mystery mutt. We will not be trying out for the national team (not that I would have the skills with a purebred either though!), but we are having a blast and I wouldn't change it for the world. It makes it all the more rewarding to me that she wasn't bred specifically to do this--she just loves it, so we continue.
     
  3. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    One day I would like to get a mutt to sport with. I have my mind set on a certain type of mix. If I were doing that, personally I'd go with an adult. That way you can see the drives/structure you are dealing with.
     
  4. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    ^ this.
    Purebred or mutt is a personal choice. One doesn't do better at sports over another just based on purity of breed.

    It's about structure, temperament, drive and health of the INDIVIDUAL.

    I would suggest getting an adult so you know all these above things personally..then go from there :) Maybe contact a rescue about a sports prospect.
     
  5. Laurelin

    Laurelin I'm All Ears

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    I should add that tons of the dogs at our agility club are mutts. All different shapes and sizes and breed types.
     
  6. SevenSins

    SevenSins APBTs & One Crazy Banana

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    Why does it have to be either purebred from a breeder OR mutt from rescue/shelter? What about a purebred (or as close as anyone can guess to being purebred) dog from a shelter or rescue? I think that the decision depends entirely on what you want to do with your dog, how much you care about being able to research your dog's lineage (and the health, structure and temperaments in it), or how important it is to have a breeder-mentor and the additional support system that comes from getting a dog from a good breeder.
     
  7. CrystalGSD

    CrystalGSD Member

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    I'd like to mention that the sport would be purely for fun. We most likely would not be going into any national competitions or anything, it would probably be more of a past time. Or maybe just some extra mental and physical stimulation for the dog, but it wouldn't be mandatory for the dog. If the dog turned out not to like flyball/agility, then I would be pretty ok with it.

    That does sound rewarding and fun :) Especially knowing that the dog wasn't meant to do it, and that the dog just likes it do it herself.

    The problem with getting an adult is that my current dog is fearful/fear aggressive towards many other adult dogs. She is extremely selective towards which adult dogs she shows her fear aggression towards, so that could be an issue... is there a possibility of evaluating drive etc in a puppy (although I do realize that some puppies change..)

    That does make sense. I've seen multiple purebred dog rescues as well as mixed rescues near Houston, so getting a purebred rescue is a good possibility (that I honestly did not think of.)
     
  8. *blackrose

    *blackrose "I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"

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    I also think there is a difference between a mutt of unknown parentage and a first (or second) generation cross with known parents.

    For example, Chloe is a farm Collie/Aussie cross. I knew when I adopted her that she was going to be around 40-50lbs, long haired, athletic, barky, and intelligent, due to her breed heritage.

    Now, my sisters Lab/Pit/Rott/Boxer/God knows what else puppy...we have no idea. He's going to be short haired. And big. Lol We don't know what traits he's going to inherit, or even really how big he's going to be. He has a good temperament and that's all my sister wanted.

    So, I think if you wanted to adopt a puppy and was really wanting a specific "type", adopting a pup that has a known heritage, not just a breed name a shelter slapped on as a guess, would be the better way to go.

    Also wanted to clarify that knowing the parentage is more important than the breed cross. Cynder was supposed to be a GSD/Lab mix. She's full grown at just under 30lbs and has a ton of Spaniel characteristics. Had Mike adopted her as a puppy with the intent of her being a big ol' dog that had GSD traits...he'd have been very disappointed.

    ETA: I think the most important thing is, what do you really want the dog for? If you adopt a puppy from unknown lineage, will you be dissapointed that it doesn't fit your agility aspirations, or will you be happy with a pet dog? Even a purebred rescue pup may have structure/drive/health issues that prevent it from competing. If you are dead set on obtaining a sport dog and would be extremely disappointed/let down if the new pup wouldn't work...then go with a breeder pup. If you'd be happy either way, or just dabbling in a sport you can both enjoy, go for a shelter pup. :)
     
  9. milos_mommy

    milos_mommy Active Member

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    I don't think mixed breed is going to be a big deciding factor or not. Purebreds are great, but so are most mixed breed dogs and especially if you're not looking for a VERY specific dog to a VERY specific job, and have time to search around a bit, a mixed breed is going to fill any need a purebred can.

    The issue here could be getting a puppy. Whether it's a purebred or a mixed breed, getting a puppy from an unknown lineage, or at least parentage, is quite risky.

    You say you want a puppy because your adult dog might have an issue with welcoming another adult into the house. Well, what if you rescue a puppy and find out at 8 months old or 18 months old that she's developing severe DA? There are certainly ways to stack the odds in your favor on that...but if you don't know the parents, you don't know what the genetic predisposition to DA is going to be. Generally, I'd say it's not a huge concern with a mixed breed of type that's less prone to DA (say, a sporting breed or companion breed VS a terrier or some working breeds), but especially if your current dog is less tolerant of other adult dogs, it's something to watch for.

    Has Crystal ever grown up with another puppy? How does she react if those puppies, upon reaching maturity, become pushy? Like if they try to hump her, take her food, or growl at her if she approaches when they have a toy or something?

    ETA: you can certainly evaluate a puppy for tendencies towards DA or other behaviors....but it's not always easy, especially if you only get a bit of time to evaluate the puppy at a rescue or shelter - the shelter might "evaluate" them, but that's done usually by completely untrained, unprofessional people who do little more than observe how energetic or engaged a puppy is. You could call some local behaviorists and see if any who are experienced would be able to evaluate a puppy for you.
     
  10. BostonBanker

    BostonBanker Active Member

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    Well shoot, I did everything people here always say is the wrong thing (got a very young puppy from unknown lineage for a sport dog, because my adult dog would easily accept a puppy into the house but not an adult), and nearly two years later, everything's coming up roses over here ;)

    The real answer is - neither is the wrong answer. If you really want this to be your purebred puppy from a breeder, go for it. Don't let the natural empathy you have towards rescues mean that you don't get what you want. If you truly think a rescue might suit your needs just as well or better, look around. Great sport prospects are certainly out there, especially if you focus on dogs who appear to be from particular breeds.
     
  11. CrystalGSD

    CrystalGSD Member

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    This absolutely make sense. In fact, we got Crystal thinking she was going to be a 70 pound German Shepherd, nope she turned out as a 40 pound Shepherd mix. The thing is, I'm not entirely picky. If I got a young pup, and it turned out it was not structurally sound or did not have the drive to do a sport, I would be entirely okay with having the dog purely as a companion.

    I totally understand what your saying, but I feel that is a risk with any dog. You could get a purebred Golden Retriever pup from a breeder, and that dog might still develop DA tendencies, even if raised with another dog. Not knowing the lineage (or only knowing part of the lineage, for example, knowing it is a Shepherd mix but not knowing what) is not something that makes me turn away from owning a mix breed.

    Crystal has been with a growing puppy, from about the age of 2 months to 11 months I believe, and he was a pretty pushy puppy. :rolleyes: She was fine with the puppy, and even upon the puppy getting bigger than her (she is 40 pounds, the pup got to about 80 pounds) she tolerated the puppy fine.

    It is all chances. It especially sucks when people jump through all the hoops of finding the perfect breeder and the perfect parents to end up with a pup that doesn't fit their needs.

    The thing is I really don't have a certain preference. Both have pros and cons that I've been trying to figure out, and one doesn't really out-do the other in any strong way. The only big put off from any of them is the cost of purebreds, but otherwise I'm pretty much on the fence. I've owned rescues, and loved them, and have never owned a purebred, but I love them, too.
     
  12. Torch

    Torch New Member

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    I love my mutt to death. I'm getting a purebred puppy this year because I am highly interested in a specific breed. However, if the stars aligned, I would love to have several different working crossbreds in my life.

    Some day.
     
  13. SaraB

    SaraB New Member

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    I adopted Zuma at 10 months and it was the perfect age. I knew what her structure would be, I knew her personality and yet I still had plenty of time to build drives and start training the way I wanted to. Adolescents are always popping up in shelters because they can be a handful and they are no longer considered puppies to most people so they are expected to behave a certain way.
     

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