Livestock Guardian Dogs?

Discussion in 'The Dog Breeds' started by sillysally, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

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    no
    check out a forum called Homesteading Today
    they have a whole subforum on livestock guards (not just dogs) the lady from Nevada is on it & has lots of good info. it's not the BS that the dogs can defeat anything, she is very realistic about what the dogs can & can't do. in fact she says she won't sell to a person that plans on putting just one dog out on open range w/ a 1000 sheep & expects zero losses. she is a serious educator about the use of LGDs.
     
  2. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    Depends. You really don't want a LSG that would rather be with people than be with stock. For me socializing a LSG that I expected to work yet not be human aggressive would be to socialize them by teaching them to flat out ignore other humans.

    The maremmas I was around weren't shy in the slightest. They also were not dogs that sought out people for comfort beyond the food dish. They did come when called but it was more of a benign "well ok." They were really happy just doing their own thing and I didn't find them particularly destructive or dogs that really suffered from separation anxiety or anxious except when they were denied their freedom to wander.
     
  3. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    The land and number of livestock is important. Most farmers around here have 3-5 of them if they expect the dogs to look after 100 acres or more. My friends had a small flock so one dog was enough.

    Our neighbours had 4 or more maremmas (they let them breed) as well as 5 donkeys and some alpacas. They still lost lambs to coyotes. (and they had the maremmas that wanted nothing to do with people)
     
  4. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Some of the farms around here have brought in the wild burros rescued from out west where they were going to be slaughtered and they've been very effective at discouraging -- and even killing marauding coyotes. Llamas have been effective too, as well as emus.

    The problem, though, with the burros, llamas and emus is that they don't discriminate between coyotes and the farm dogs, or cats.
     
  5. Xandra

    Xandra Active Member

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    lol I've never heard of emus being used... llamas yes. Mine will try to stop canines but not cats or chickens or anything else.
     
  6. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    I hadn't either, but several farmers around here swear by them . . . and at them sometimes, lol.
     
  7. Pops2

    Pops2 New Member

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    we still have open range out west, hundreds of thousands of acres that one flock can scatter across. that is as important as the numbers in the flock.
    put one dog on 5 acres w/ 5ft field fencing & a barn & you don't even need a dedicated LGD (filas have performed extremely well in situations like this). there are so many variables to achieve success. but after you've done everything else, numbers of dogs that really want to do the job seem to be the final factor.
     
  8. Kat09Tails

    Kat09Tails *Now with Snark*

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    I have heard of people using ostriches in Arizona. I have also heard that within a generation coyotes learn to adapt and have no problem attacking Llamas, donkeys, and two legged big birds.

    The main thing is a dose of reality. LSG dogs are not a magic wand anymore than a PP dog will knock down doors, off the badguy, smoke a cigarette, and then call 911 for you.
     
  9. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    My aunt raised an emu chick as a novelty. Maya the emu lived in the chicken yard with a pair of geese and about thirty chickens, and was extremely gentle and tame. They even trained her to pull a cart for my little cousins to ride in. One morning she went out to feed the birds, and there was Maya pecking at a dead coyote. My aunt was very pleased, though she said she had no idea an emu would do that.
     
  10. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    Around here there are far far more LGD breeds than Filas. I had never even met a fila till I met Kharma.

    Our land is very hilly and such. Even with all those animals I posted on a 300 acre farm (the sheep roamed about 200 of it) our neighbours lost over 100 lambs one season to coyotes. You need lots of protectors as you can't see very far, and our coyotes are plentiful

    Our friends with the one LGB also had a llama and a BC. They still lost the odd sheep but nothing like before. And that was with about 30 adult sheep roaming about 30 of their 100 acres.

    So land and predation rates are going to has a great an effect as the number of LGB dogs. Esp if you have herds that like to split. Sheep are also dumb, they are for ever wandering away from the group. Easy noms for some stealthy coyote.
     
  11. sillysally

    sillysally Obey the Toad.

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    I do like donkeys and would consider a large one, but I know they generally are just canine aggressive in general. Also, I have heard that they prefer the company of other equines, and if there are horses and such they will hang out with them more than the animals they are trying to protect.

    Llamas I don't care for much--lol. My grandpa used to run a herd of them and they were foul tempered things--although none of them got attacked by anything...

    Emus are awesome and I would LOVE an emu. When I went to the exotic animal auction this past fall they had young emus and I had to practically sit on my hands to keep from bidding on one--lol. I don't think the dogs would have appreciated being harassed by an emu every time they went out to pee though. On the chicken board I go on occasionally several members swear by game cocks to protect their floacks from smaller predators.

    All this would not be for a few years but I am a compulsive researcher and like to be prepared (and often over prepared-lol). I honestly had not considered need a LGD before until we saw the size of that coyote this past weekend on our hike. Add to that the fact that dogs have been reported going after livestock in this region--one woman I know had a llama attacked and severely injured by dogs and a couple of years ago a pair of dogs killed a horse not far from here.
     
  12. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    Llamas and alpacas that are raised with people are quite nice. I have yet to meet a nice emu. They might exist, but they were quite the thing here for a while so I got to meet quite a few.
     
  13. Xandra

    Xandra Active Member

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    I've met nice emus (at the fair), it is awesome that they are good for something (maybe). I'd love to see one in action. I haven't found llamas mean or uncooperative and certainly not aggressive, just really bitchy. It's funny though.
     
  14. sillysally

    sillysally Obey the Toad.

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    I do like alpacas. My grandpas were raised with people and could be handled, they were just unpleasant. I have heard that about emus too--I'm weird though, snotty birds don't bother me....
     
  15. Dekka

    Dekka Just try me..

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    Emus are good for something, they are freakin tasty!!!!!
     
  16. sillysally

    sillysally Obey the Toad.

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    I have always wanted to try their eggs. At the same auction I saw the emus at someone was selling a box full of ostrich eggs. They went for like $75.
     
  17. Renee750il

    Renee750il Felurian

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    Sally, a lot of the more knowledgeable chicken farmers here keep game hens to raise eggs because they are better mothers and way more protective.
     
  18. Romy

    Romy Taxiderpy

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    Maya may have been the exception, temperament-wise. She got along fine with their GSD. When they got out of poultry after a few years of having her, she was sold to a petting zoo in Idaho. The owner of the zoo was ecstatic to find an emu that was so gentle and trustworthy with the kids, in addition to cart trained.

    Edit: I only kept gamefowl because they made such awesome range birds. Our gamecocks were the best, they'd drive everyone under cover if they spotted a hawk and come fetch us at the door if a raccoon came around.
     
  19. SpicyBulldog

    SpicyBulldog New Member

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    Imo socializing won't hinder their ability. Some don't social but it sure doesn't hurt. They are there to protect against predators. Sometimes man too (where I lived before it wasn't an everyday thing but some will steal a goat for meat), and they will still protect their charges and property from people even with socialization.

    I like a dog who can guard animal, family, home or property. Whatever is needed of the dog. I also want that dog to be manageable in public. I don't care if they don't accept non family members on the property. Absolute must they be good with the children.
     
  20. Fran101

    Fran101 Resident fainting goat

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    GET A LLAMA!! LOOK AT THE CUTE
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